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Genuine Windows XP


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#1 BillyBobberson

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Posted 28 September 2013 - 12:47 PM

Hello, everyone.

 

I bought a second-hand Compaq notebook recently and was waiting to be able to come online with it. Now I am online I'd like to know how to find out if XP installed on it is genuine and updatable with Windows Update. I don't know whether or not I should use Microsoft's own programme to see if it is genuine or not in case it disables the OS if it's not. What should I do?

 

Thanks.



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#2 dc3

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 10:36 AM

If this computer hasn't been activated you should be receiving a prompt to activate this copy of XP when you boot into the operating system.  If you aren't being prompted to do this I would have to believe that this is the original copy of Windows XP.  If the previous owner recently reinstalled the operating system you have 30 days to activate this copy.  After that your computer will only allow you to activate this copy when you boot into the operating system, you will not be able to do anything else.

 

On the bottom of the notebook there is a tag which contains the 25 alphanumerical product key, this is the key which is used to activate this computer.  


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#3 Wolverine 7

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 03:13 PM

Also you can validate your windows install online at http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windows/help/genuine/what-is-validation



#4 dc3

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 03:38 PM

Also you can validate your windows install online at http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windows/help/genuine/what-is-validation

 

They are trying to avoid that.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 myopinion

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 04:03 PM

Is there a COA sticker on the laptop? IMHO, you already have an outdated OS that is no longer going to be supported soon. Moreover, to run without all necessary updates would be a risky proposition (for me) as they are still exploiting XP vulnerabilities to this very day. Now, I'm not going to try and tell you what you should personally do here because you have already been given a few suggestions; however, I can tell you the world would not end if your XP was found to be not genuine. There are other free operating systems that might work quite well on your rig. Zorin, Linux Mint, and Ubuntu are a few that come to mind. Good luck.



#6 BillyBobberson

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 06:49 AM

Thanks for the replies. I don't know what COA stands for, but I found a 25-digit key separated by dashes every 5 characters, and it says it is the product key.

I realise XP is out-of-date and will soon stop being supported, but it ws the cheapest in the shop when I bought it.

I have tried Ubuntu before and found it complicated; I don't particularly enjoy MS for its programmes, but it has a GUI that I can use; Ubuntu, I found, is more CLI which is rather confusing for me - and having to learn all the commands, etc. I was given a Mint live CD years ago by a tutor in college but for some reason it asked for a username and password. I tried different things, including "admin" not using a password, etc., but none of them worked. Would you say Mint is the easiest to use for someone so used to GUIs?

In the meantime I will try and update Windows here and see what happens.

Thanks.



#7 dc3

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 09:24 AM

COA is Certificate of Authenticity, also known as the Microsoft product key.  This is the 25 character alphanumerical code you found.  It should also show the operating system, in this case Windows XP.

 

If you are not being prompted to activate this copy I would be willing to bet that it is a genuine copy of Windows.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#8 petewills

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 09:54 AM

Microsoft FAQs
 
"Regardless of genuine status, you'll still be able to get critical security updates. However, if your copy of Windows isn't genuine, you won't be able to install many updates that are exclusively for genuine Windows customers, including Microsoft Security Essentials. Microsoft strongly recommends that you get genuine Microsoft software immediately to help ensure a safer computing experience."
 
Seems odd that Microsoft allows any updating, for non-genuine status.
 
On the Linux matter, I only have a bootable DVD for Linux Mint, works very well, nice interface, easy to use.
I have no reason to believe it would be any different if I installed it to my hard drive.
I've never been asked for a password with Mint Live CD/DVDs, just boots to the Mint desktop automatically,
albeit slowly obviously - about 3 mins on my old desktop computer, Win XP Home.


#9 BillyBobberson

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 06:53 AM

COA is Certificate of Authenticity, also known as the Microsoft product key.  This is the 25 character alphanumerical code you found.  It should also show the operating system, in this case Windows XP.

 

If you are not being prompted to activate this copy I would be willing to bet that it is a genuine copy of Windows.

 

I'm not being prompted, so it must be genuine, then. I haven't started to do any updates because I've been doing other things, but if anything goes wrong you know I'll be coming back!



#10 BillyBobberson

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 06:54 AM

 

Microsoft FAQs
 
"Regardless of genuine status, you'll still be able to get critical security updates. However, if your copy of Windows isn't genuine, you won't be able to install many updates that are exclusively for genuine Windows customers, including Microsoft Security Essentials. Microsoft strongly recommends that you get genuine Microsoft software immediately to help ensure a safer computing experience."
 
Seems odd that Microsoft allows any updating, for non-genuine status.
 
On the Linux matter, I only have a bootable DVD for Linux Mint, works very well, nice interface, easy to use.
I have no reason to believe it would be any different if I installed it to my hard drive.
I've never been asked for a password with Mint Live CD/DVDs, just boots to the Mint desktop automatically,
albeit slowly obviously - about 3 mins on my old desktop computer, Win XP Home.

 

 

I think I'll have a look at seeing about downloading Linux, then. I think I'll have a look at Mint first, since it was both mentioned here and given to me before.



#11 petewills

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 06:58 AM

Sometimes, if asked for a password, it is only necessary to type the word Mint, or mint and press enter.

The latest Mint 15 DVD download is just under 1 GB, apparently.

 

Linux Mint 15, 32 bit, 'Olivia', Cinnamon Desktop - 928MB

 

http://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=131


Edited by petewills , 06 October 2013 - 10:29 AM.


#12 TsVk!

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 07:28 PM

I prefer Debian to other Linux distros... But you will find others have similar/same GUI interfaces. I use KDE (gui interface) but previously used GNOME which was much easier when I first started and was beginning to understand the OS.

 

So, in short... there's lots of options. Research both the distro and gui packs and choose what's right for you.






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