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Is TrueCrypt/aes broken?


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#1 newjersian1

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 01:02 AM

I have had this question rolling around in my head for several months now. I attended a presentation by a police officer who specialized in computer security. One of his main jobs is to scan computers for child pornography. He said he did this by inserting a flash drive given to the police department by a federal agency (I believe it was the NSA) and looking at what the flash drive came up with. I raised my hand and asked him what he did if the computer's owner had encrypted files and he said that it didn't matter. He specifically referenced TrueCrypt when he said, " Some people use encryption programs such as TrueCrypt to try to hide their files, but all it does is make the flash drive run a little longer."

 

So how can this work? I am not looking to start an argument about the overreaching powers of the federal government. I am just curious as to how this little flash drive can detect hidden TrueCrypt volumes and then see if there is illegal pornography on them. 



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#2 Bezukhov

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 01:58 AM

I wonder if they were talking about this. It would still be something of a roll of the dice, IMHO.

 

And for some happy news here is a thread from Wilders Security Forums explaining what it would take to break  a 256 bit key.

 

 

 

 

 


To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#3 newjersian1

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 02:21 AM

That's an interesting article and that software may very well be the way that they could break into TrueCrypt. As you said however, it would take some pretty good luck to gain possession when the container is mounted. The officer stated that they used the flash drive on thousands of computers per year and it dosn't seem like the police would be satisfied with such a chancy method. 



#4 quietman7

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Posted 23 September 2013 - 07:54 AM

Investigators use a variety of techniques and proprietary software forensic applications to examine the copy, searching hidden folders and unallocated disk space for copies of deleted, encrypted, or damaged files. Any evidence found on the digital copy is carefully documented in a "finding report" and verified with the original in preparation for legal proceedings that involve discovery, depositions, or actual litigation.

What is computer forensics (cyber forensics)?
Computer Forensics

Law enforcement is not going to reveal all specifics to the general public on how some of their tools work in order to ensure the bad guys do not have that information and use to impede investigations.
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