Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Internet Connection Problem


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Kaityf

Kaityf

  • Members
  • 138 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:33 PM

Posted 17 September 2013 - 02:59 PM

My computer is about 5 years old and is beginning to show signs of wear.  The other day it started to have problems connecting to the Internet.  It is connected directly to the router via a cable, although it is not the main connection. (Hope that made sense.)

 

I would get a message that an a network cable was disconnected, although it was connected.  I disconnected and then connected it again and it would work.  But it was doing this more and more. I wasn't sure it this was my computer or the cable, so I attached the cable to my laptop, after disconnecting the wireless connection, and it worked fine.  That led me to think that the problem was my computer.

 

But then the wireless connection stopped working as well. I couldn't connect to my network on my cell phone, my tablet, or my laptop. I called my service provider, who told me to unplug both the router and the modem and then plug them back in.  That took care of it.  I was able to connect again.

 

However, this continues to happen. My computer keeps periodically alerting me that a local network cable is disconneted, when it's not. At times when I check the network connection on my phone, it will say that my home network is not in range, when of course it is.

 

There is clearly a problem, but I don't know where it is.  I can't afford to buy a whole new system (thanks to ACA, my work hours were just cut in half), so I'd like to pinpoint the problem.  I'm thinking it's a router problem, rather than a modem problem.  But then it could be the modem.  I don't know if my computer could be affecting the router and modem. That would seem odd, but I don't know.

 

When I see this problem, I check the router and modem.  The router will not show that the connections are working -- that is, the lights are not lit up.  That's what makes me think it's the router.  But then if the modem isn't working, wouldn't that affect the router?  The modem lights will be on even when the router lights aren't.

I hope I have provided enough information and that someone can help me figure this out.



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,753 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:06:33 PM

Posted 17 September 2013 - 03:41 PM

Generally...the "network cable is unplugged" message happens because of:

 

a.  The cable IS unplugged or loosened at either end.

 

b.  The signal from the router to the cable connection via the modem...has a problem at some junction.

 

c.  The ISP has a problem that interrupts service to customers.

 

For me...it's generally A that produces this message :).  But I've also had a router flameout on me and same message resulted.

 

You have to check both the router...and the modem...since modems die...to determine which is the problem.  You do this by eliminating the router from the equation and attaching directly from modem to a given system.  That's how I knew that my router needed replacement.

 

I just went to Amazon, ordered a $20-25 broadband router, which came a few days later...my problem was resolved.  You don't jhave to spend more money on a router, although some seem to think it makes a difference (I do not).

 

On a 4-port router...all ports are equal...there is no primary :).

 

Louis



#3 Kaityf

Kaityf
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 138 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:33 PM

Posted 17 September 2013 - 05:55 PM

The cable is not unplugged.  Perhaps I didn't make that clear enough. It's not loose either.  Even if it were, that wouldn't explain why the wireless network would show up as "out of range" on my other devices when it's in the next room.

 

I understand what you mean about the primary connection, but again, perhaps I didn't explain this well. One computer is plugged into the modem. Then there is a connection to the router.  There are connections from the router to other computers.  Am I right?  I might not have that correct. But there is a modem and there is a router. Isn't the modem attached to just one computer? That's what I was referring to as the primary connection. 

I don't think there is a problem with the ISP service. I already called them and worked on it from that angle.

 

So it could be your B).  That takes me back to my original question.  I'm not sure if the problem is the router or the modem.  I'm glad it's not likely my computer, but even so, with my salary cut in half, I really don't want to buy a new modem AND a new router.  I'd like to get this problem pinpointed, if possible.



#4 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,753 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:06:33 PM

Posted 17 September 2013 - 06:38 PM

The cable from the wall...should run to the modem...which should run to the router...all systems should be attached to the router.  This arrangement gives all computers maximum protection, as well as connectivity.

 

I cannot be any clearer on this.  Any other setup introduces unnecessary variables into your network setup.

 

Louis



#5 jhayz

jhayz

  • BC Advisor
  • 6,922 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:33 AM

Posted 17 September 2013 - 08:07 PM

One computer is plugged into the modem. Then there is a connection to the routerThere are connections from the router to other computers.

 A modem has only one LAN/WAN port and can only physically connect one device, either a router or a computer. If the modem is already occupied by the one computer, then the additional router access point would not be able to extend wired/wireless function. An ADSL router is usually a modem/router in one which has a WAN or phone socket with 4 LAN port with wireless capabilit


Tekken
 


#6 Queen-Evie

Queen-Evie

    Official Bleepin' G.R.I.T.S. (and proud of it)


  • Staff Emeritus
  • 16,485 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:My own little corner of the universe (somewhere in Alabama). It's OK, they know me here
  • Local time:06:33 PM

Posted 17 September 2013 - 09:57 PM

Have you plugged the computer directly to the modem?

 

Take the router out of the equation for a while and see what happens. If you can connect and the connection holds the problem is probably your router.  The only drawback is that you will have to unplug the router from the modem, which will cause you NOT to have a wireless network.

 

Routers have a wide price range. You don't have to buy an expensive if the router needs to be replaced. If it does, look at the sale ads for stores in your area that sell computers for a router on sale. Even if it is expensive to you go to the store and look. I got my last 2 routers at Office Depot, one was $39.99 and the other was the same model on sale for $10 less.



#7 Kaityf

Kaityf
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 138 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:05:33 PM

Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:18 PM

A modem has only one LAN/WAN port and can only physically connect one device, either a router or a computer. If the modem is already occupied by the one computer, then the additional router access point would not be able to extend wired/wireless function.

 

Derp. Of course.  There is some long-ago reason I refer to that computer as the main connection.  I don't remember what it was.  In any case, yes, the cable runs to the modem, which is physically connected to the router, which has three direct connections running to three different computers. I did try switching the cables around, but that doesn't make any difference.

 

Take the router out of the equation for a while and see what happens. If you can connect and the connection holds the problem is probably your router.

I can try that.   I don't need wireless all day and at least I can find out if the problem is the router.

Thanks everyone.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users