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Intel i7 2600k CPU overheating when idle. Failed CPU Temp Sensor?


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#1 Grinler

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 07:51 AM

I came home last night and found that I was getting alerts that my CPU was overheating at 97 celcius. So I opened the computer, cleaned out all the dust, took a look at the CPU (which was not scorching hot), and put it back together. The computer was off for a good 30 minutes and when it came back on it showed the same alert. So I kept the computer off for an hour and when I started it up again, immediately it said that the CPU was overheating. Finally, I turned it off overnight and when I turned it on 7 hours later, it immediately said it was overheating when it got to the BIOS. Once it booted into Windows, I took a screenshot using core temp.

coretemp.jpg

Is it possible for CPU heat sensors to fail? Are the sensors actually found in the CPU or in the motherboard? From what I reading I think its the CPU itself, but want to confirm before I replace the CPU.

If anyone can help or confirm my suspicions I would appreciate it.

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#2 Juisterr

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:03 AM

You can re-check it with speedfan ?

http://www.almico.com/sfdownload.php


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#3 Maxstar

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:07 AM

Hi,

Have you also checked the temperatures in the bios?

If you use the stock cooler from Intel check the four clips of the cooler on the motherboard.

 

Cooler%20Socket%201155%20Intel%20E97378-

 


Edited by Maxstar, 14 September 2013 - 08:11 AM.

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#4 Grinler

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:44 AM

Yes, the minute you turn the computer on, the BIOS gives the temperature overheating. It shows it as 97 Celsius. For example, I just left the house for 45 minutes. Before I left, I shutdown and unplugged my computer. 45 minutes should be more than adequate time for the cpu to cool off. The second I turn it on, the bios reports it as overheating. This is why I feel its a sensor failure rather than the CPU actually overheating.

#5 Grinler

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:45 AM

You can re-check it with speedfan ?
http://www.almico.com/sfdownload.php


Every utility is reporting it as high.

#6 Allen

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:49 AM

Found something

 

 

If the fan is very cool and the processor is reporting very hot, I would first suspect the connection between the fan/heatsink and the processor package. Make sure the heatsink is properly seated with thermal paste.

Let's get some terminology straight from Lavalys' KB:

  • CPU Diode or Core temperature is the temperature measured across a temperature sensitive diode on the processor die. The most common implementation uses a temperature sensor part external to the processor with the CPU Thermal Diode Anode (+) and Cathode (-) connections to it.
  • CPU Temperature is the temperature measured by a remote temperature sensors part on the motherboard near the CPU.

It is possible for these temperature sensors to fail although I haven't seen it personally.

Try installing a different processor and see if the readings are still incorrect. This can help point to where the problem lies. If the readings are OK, I would suspect your processor, if they are off as well, then suspect the parts on the board.

Unfortunately, if it isn't the heatsink, there is no easy user fix other than replacing the offending part.

 

 

-borrowed from http://superuser.com/questions/55632/cpu-temperature-sensor-wrong -

 


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#7 Grinler

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:53 AM

Unfortunately, I do not have another CPU handy. I suspect its a false reading simply because its being detected at such a high temperature immediately when I turn the computer on. I can't see how a CPU would jump from a unpowered temp to 97 in 2 seconds.

#8 tagy

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 08:57 AM

Change fan first, if that doesn't fix it then yes the sensor could be bad on the board. You can also check the bios heat temp settings if your board has that feature. Try upping the temp and see what happens. 



#9 Grinler

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 09:02 AM

Will get a new fan today. I still find it strange that the bios would report it overheating on post right after a cold start. If it was a real reading, what could cause a CPU to jump that high that fast in just 2-3 seconds.

#10 hamluis

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 09:05 AM

Well...if it;s a sensor problem...I would expect that not to necessarily affect how the system runs.  The warining would be improeperly triggered...but the effects warranting the warning would be missing.

 

But...if the system actually is overheating, then that should be reflected in how Windows runs/performs.  Does Event Viewer reflect any anomalous entries that seem unusual for your system?

 

Me...I'd run the system based on the premise that...if the warning is valid, I wind up replacing the CPU and/or heatsink, after checking, etc.  If the warning is valid, the system will shut down/turn off (IME) before any real damage can be done to motherboard/CPU.

 

You have overheat alarm enabled in your BIOS?  Some disable such, which is why I ask.

 

Louis

 

I've seen the system reflect overheating immediately after boot...I had failed to connect the CPU fan. 


Edited by hamluis, 14 September 2013 - 09:11 AM.


#11 bfarmer

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 09:06 AM

Hi,

Have you also checked the temperatures in the bios?

If you use the stock cooler from Intel check the four clips of the cooler on the motherboard.

 

Cooler%20Socket%201155%20Intel%20E97378-

 

I agree, check that a clip hasn't popped loose. If it hasn't, it might be a good time to remove the cooler, clean off the old paste and apply new.

I don't think it is really overheating immediately, unless it is shorted out. I suspect a bad sensor, but you need to be sure the fan and heat sink are properly mounted to prevent a melt down.



#12 bfarmer

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 09:08 AM

Will get a new fan today. I still find it strange that the bios would report it overheating on post right after a cold start. If it was a real reading, what could cause a CPU to jump that high that fast in just 2-3 seconds.

 

 

If the fan is working, no need to replace it. Just get some thermal paste and reattach it with new paste. If one or two mounting clips popped loose, it will leave enough of a gap to let it overheat.



#13 Grinler

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 09:18 AM

Well...if it;s a sensor problem...I would expect that not to necessarily affect how the system runs. The warining would be improeperly triggered...but the effects warranting the warning would be missing.

But...if the system actually is overheating, then that should be reflected in how Windows runs/performs. Does Event Viewer reflect any anomalous entries that seem unusual for your system?


That was my thought. I first noticed this last night when the computer suddenly crashed. Then on reboot it was giving the error about high temps. So far, though, there has not been any system instability as far as I can see. Will know more later when I fire up some more CPU intensive tasks.

You have overheat alarm enabled in your BIOS? Some disable such, which is why I ask.


Yes, I disabled that. Otherwise my computer wasn't letting me into Windows as it was automatically pushing me to the BIOS due to the overheating CPU.


I agree, check that a clip hasn't popped loose. If it hasn't, it might be a good time to remove the cooler, clean off the old paste and apply new.

I don't think it is really overheating immediately, unless it is shorted out. I suspect a bad sensor, but you need to be sure the fan and heat sink are properly mounted to prevent a melt down.


I cleaned out the cooler and cpu last night. Definitely lots of dust. I reseated the cpu cooler last night. Admittedly one pin doesn't click all the way in as much as I would like, but if I remember correctly its always been like that since I purchased the cpu in 2011. I tried last night to get it to click in fully and it just wont go. Even still, for the past 2 years, never had an issue till last night.

The thermal paste did look old and thin. Will get some artic silver from newegg and reapply. What is the best method to clean off the old paste?

#14 rotor123

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 09:35 AM

Hi, I use Isopropyl Alcohol for cleaning.

 

I would be suspicious that the the heat sink is not attached properly if One of the four pins does not go in as far as the others. In my Experience they always sit at the same point. Since You are going the Newegg route for the Arctic Silver, Why not order a new heatsink as well.

 

Notice that part of the heatsink at the bottom of the image with the arrow pointing to it. If one of those did not go through the hole in the motherboard the heatsink will not be seated properly. I have seen cases where one of the two halves went through the hole and the other one got bent over on top of the motherboard.

 

cooler-socket-1155-intel-e97378-001-2.jp

 

There is a possibilty that the CPU is running hot and has throttled back the speed to protect itself. I have seen Older Dells where the heatsink came loose, Dimension 2400 for example, and the computer would not even stay on long enough to finish the P.O.S.T. process.

The heat sink will not feel hot if it isn't attached properly.

 

Good Luck

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#15 Grinler

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 09:44 AM

Im not discarding the fact that it may not be seated properly, but the reality is heat sink or no, I cant see why the CPU would shoot up to 97 degrees the minute its turned on. This is right at the BIOS post stage. That's what leads me to believe its a sensor as I can see no reason for it to skyrocket that fast when just posting bios.




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