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Which adhesive for plastic sheet on Motherboard?


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#1 Chadwick217

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 09:24 PM

Hi all,

 

    I recently took my computer apart to clean after a spill I had. On my motherboard there are two black plastic films/sheets/covers (not sure what they do) stuck to the underside: one covering components on one corner (about a 1" x 3.5" piece) and one covering the underside of the processor (about 0.5" x 0.5"). 

 

The problem I have is that I accidentally set both sticky-side down on a towel and now there's lint all over them. I figured I can remove the stickiness with nail polish remover, but I don't know what this adhesive stuff is. They don't seem like important pieces, but I don't want to use the wrong adhesive and damage the mobo.

 

I've looked all over google and most people talk about appropriate glue or tape for heat sinks or holding important parts together. All I really need is a glue or tape that is motherboard safe just to hold these things to the board that doesn't chemically break down, leave goo on the components, stays sticky (like scotch tape), and doesn't make super strong bonds (just enough to stick it). And cheap would be awesome.

 

I've looked into normal scotch tape, but others say it could melt with high heat and leave a residue. 

thermal tape too, but I got the vibe that it makes a pretty strong bond

rubber cement, but I read that over time it releases sulfuric acid. yikes!!

 

Hope I didn't write too much, just want to be thorough. Any advice would be awesome.

 

computer:

 

hp envy 15t-j000 quad laptop

windows 8 (forum said I had to list it)

intel core i7

 



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 06:32 PM

These pieces of plastic are normally there to prevent accidental short circuits by, typically, bits of conducting debris getting to the components they protect. I'm thinking here of stuff like metal dust / scarff if the laptop were to be used in an engineering background.

 

Even though you put these pieces sticky side down on a towel, they might still be sticky enough to stay in place, it's not as though they are under much stress. Failing that, sticky tape like Scotch tape would work for the piece in the corner, the piece under the processor is likely to get a bit hotter - typically 50 - 60 C or thereabouts. If it is short of 'stick', a small dab of a common household glue like 'Evostik' in each corner should do the job.

 

Since I don't know where you live, I can't talk about brands of glue available to you !  But Evostik is widely available in the UK and comes in tubes and cans depending on how much you want, so there will be probably something similar where you live. If all else fails, have a word with somebody in your local hardware store.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 Chadwick217

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Posted 12 September 2013 - 12:28 AM

Thank you for the response Chris; very detailed answer. So you know, I live in the US.

wow, nice to know that extra level of protection is there. I actually got this computer for my engineering classes at my university.

 

Sadly though, since I'm in the US Evostick isn't really available here. I could order it online perhaps; or if you know other glues similar to evostick. 3M and Scotch brand are pretty huge adhesive companies here. 

 

Today though I discovered a computer repair shop and the guy said that a good quality electrical tape would be fine; just putting a couple pieces around the corners. Found this and it seems pretty safe for the motherboard:

 

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Scotch-3-4-in-x-66-ft-Super-33-Electrical-Tape-6132-BA-10/100073402#.UjFPhtJzGuJ

 

it stays good up to 105 C and by the high 90s the computer should be turned off anyways to avoid heat damage. Any thoughts?



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 06:22 PM

If that tape is good for 100C, then go with it - your processor should never get that hot. And if it ever does, you will have bigger problems than worrying about a couple of square inches of plastic film falliing out of position !

 

You almost certainly can buy Evostik in your local hardware store - it's just not called Evostik in the USA. This is a permanent problem with dealing across international borders. As a trivial example, a brand of cake / biscuit my sister-in-law is fond of is called 'Lulu' in France, and the identical delicacy is called 'Barny' in the UK.

 

Being a tight fisted Scot, I might be inclined to try sweet-talking the guy in the repair shop for a few inches of the tape - cheaper than buying 66ft of the stuff !

 

Chris Cosgrove



#5 Chadwick217

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 12:40 AM

Okay, I put everything back together and the computer works thankfully. Now to avoid setting anything liquid near my computer from now on.

 

yeah, I know what you mean about the name differences; really makes it difficult sometimes when I'm in a different country. I ended up using the electrical tape and found out I actually had some in the garage already, haha. Thanks again for the help Chris. You were genuinely helpful.

 

 Chad



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 14 September 2013 - 04:45 PM

Now to avoid setting anything liquid near my computer from now on

 

Good in theory, hard in practice ( ie = real life ) !  Glad you have it back together and working again,

 

Chris Cosgrove






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