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Ip address


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13 replies to this topic

#1 ragethjj23

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 01:41 PM

My appartment building has a deal with charter for internet.  So I pay for internet through a "bulk account" with my rent.  Does each apartment have its own individual Ip address, or is it the same for everyone in the building?  Thanks



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#2 Animal

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 02:40 PM

Not knowing the network configuration thats impossible to answer with any certainty. I suggest you ask the person you pay for your service.

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#3 ragethjj23

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 02:43 PM

Ok, all i know is that they control whom gets it.  Basically, they connected something so that our apartment received it, charter had nothing to do with it.



#4 Animal

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 03:00 PM

Without knowing the topology of the network I'm completely guessing.

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


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#5 yabbadoo

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 04:54 PM

My understanding is that an Internet Provider is assigned a single unique "group" IP. The Provider then connects any number of users within their area to the Internet. Each individual connection is assigned a unique individual or external IP, but is also assigned the same hidden group IP as all other users for Provider service control and finance purposes.
 
Every single user on the specific Provider network has the same hidden group IP, but each user has their own unique external visual IP, which can be seen by all sites visited. This is the IP we all know as our own. Obviously the Provider has to agree and supply Internet access facilities to each user on request and acceptance.
 
The group hidden IP is confidential to the Provider and poses no security risk at all of any cross connection or transmission irregularities to users.
 
This is I believe the basic structure of all Local Area Networks. It is the same principle as a postal district, where all houses and apartments have a unique individual number, but all have the same common street name.
 
I am no expert on this but have tried to answer the OP`s question in simple terms and if there is something wrong with this explanation, please correct my description accordingly.

Edited by yabbadoo, 08 September 2013 - 05:06 PM.


#6 ragethjj23

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 05:11 PM

The reason I ask is because I think that it is one IP and that everyone in the building has the same address.  I was told that if we set up our router incorrectly it would affect the speed of other users.  I could ask the property manager, but I don't think she would have any idea...



#7 Animal

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 05:13 PM

If there is a router within the premises or area serving the building you have a unique LAN IP. Meaning just within the building you have a unique IP. However beyond the building and to the Internet you have a shared IP. If the building does not have a router but pays bulk rates for service and just manages connectivity it's possible you have your own ISP provided IP. This is why I say it's not possible to know with certainty without more information.

The Internet is so big, so powerful and pointless that for some people it is a complete substitute for life.
Andrew Brown (1938-1994)


A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


"Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination circles the world." Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


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#8 jhayz

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 09:21 PM

Use ipconfig/all on cmd to check on your ip addresses. Try also using Advanced IP scanner to identify your router and individually connected computers and devices. http://www.advanced-ip-scanner.com/


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#9 ragethjj23

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 09:53 PM

When i use that program, it shows my laptop, my desktop, my router, and what i believe to be my ipad...as well as 2 samsung electro mechaics devices that i have no idea what they are.



#10 jhayz

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:31 PM

Any description and or are they connected?


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#11 ragethjj23

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:45 PM

The names are 10.0.0.6 and 10.0.0.8 they are connected



#12 jhayz

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 09:49 PM

Any descriptions/information, MAC addresses? What IP addresses is your router and other known devices?


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#13 ragethjj23

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:02 PM

Mac addresses for those two are CC:3A:61:14:1F:E9 and 90:18:7C:80:A7:45 respectively...My router is 10.0.0.1 Desktop 10.0.0.2 laptop 10.0.0.7 ipad 10.0.0.5



#14 jhayz

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 12:02 AM

The default private address is the 10.0.0.1 (dhcp pool address is up to 10.0.0.2XX)for the router/ISP then it means the unknown devices which is currently active (usually checkmark with computer icon) are connected to your own network.


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