Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

CD/DVD Drive No Longer Reads Disks


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 DariRyu

DariRyu

  • Members
  • 44 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:14 AM

Posted 07 September 2013 - 12:38 PM

My domestic partner runs a Dell Latitude D620 laptop computer.  Last night while he was listening to an audio CD, the CD began to skip, and then Windows Media Player 11 froze completely.  It froze the entire computer and forced him to hard-reboot the computer.  He elected not to turn the computer back on and instead went to bed.

 

This morning when he turned the computer back on, the drive would not read his audio CD.  We tried several more CDs.  No audio CD will be read, it usually does not read program CDs, and the attempts to make it read a DVD resulted in the movie playing for a few seconds and then freezing.

 

It's as though the drive just "gives up" reading the disk.

 

As for fixes, we have uninstalled and then reinstalled Windows Media Player 11, and fiddled around with some of the drive's properties.  But we have been as of yet too afraid to fiddle with much and nothing has been changed.  Notably he has a Sonic Applications "DLA" program on his computer.  He says he did indeed install it, but he does not remember why.  Only that he DID install it.  I myself am really not sure what this is.

 

Any ideas what's going on and/or how to fix it?

 

~*Dari



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 13,991 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:09:14 PM

Posted 07 September 2013 - 12:45 PM

Rather than spending a lot of time trying fixes, the best first step is to see if the drive can read a bootable CD or DVD, such as a Windows installation disc or a Linux Live CD/DVD. This eliminates Windows from the scenario. If the drive cannot read a disc to boot from, it has a dirty laser lens that needs to be cleaned, or has failed and needs replacement. If it can boot from one type but not the other, this indicates the relevant part of the dual laser has failed. If it can boot the system OK from discs, then it's sensible to proceed with further faultfinding.


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#3 DariRyu

DariRyu
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 44 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:14 AM

Posted 07 September 2013 - 10:32 PM

Unfortunately we do not own a bootable CD such as you described.  All of our computers were bought as refurbished units.

 

~*Dari



#4 Anshad Edavana

Anshad Edavana

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,805 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:India
  • Local time:04:44 PM

Posted 07 September 2013 - 11:47 PM

Hi

 

You can download a small sized live Linux CD like Puppy for testing.

 

http://distro.ibiblio.org/puppylinux/puppy-5.6/slacko-5.6-PAE.iso

 

Burn the ISO to a blank CD - http://pcsupport.about.com/od/toolsofthetrade/ht/burnisofile.htm

 

Now set the CD drive as the first boot device in BIOS and try to boot from it. If it is failing, the drive's reading eye might be faulty. Before replacing the drive, try cleaning the dusts first. Reading eye is very sensitive so i recommend using a lens cleaning disc to do the job properly.

 

http://www.amazon.com/DVD-Lens-Cleaning-Disc-08015/dp/B009X54IF6



#5 DariRyu

DariRyu
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 44 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:14 AM

Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:16 AM

Er... if I set the BIOS to boot from the disk and it won't read the disk... won't that mean the computer won't boot at all?

 

~*Dari



#6 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,406 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:06:14 AM

Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:47 AM

I would be thinking that the optical disk may be defective, myself.

 

Louis



#7 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 13,991 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:09:14 PM

Posted 09 September 2013 - 05:33 PM

Er... if I set the BIOS to boot from the disk and it won't read the disk... won't that mean the computer won't boot at all?

 

~*Dari

Yes, that's the point - if the drive cannot read the disc to boot, you'll immediately know it either has a dirty laser lens and thus needs cleaning, or a faulty laser and thus needs replacing (a small chance there could be an interface fault, but still not a Windows/software fault). If it's a mechanical fault with the drive, there's no point wasting time & effort with other faultfinding. If the drive operating on its own without Windows drivers consistently boots to Linux, Windows setup or whatever the disc is, then you know to keep looking for a problem in the Windows drivers etc.


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#8 DariRyu

DariRyu
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 44 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:14 AM

Posted 10 September 2013 - 01:14 AM

Well, there's a problem with that -- this computer has no backup.  So if the drive is bad, it won't boot off the CD, and that means the computer won't EVER boot again, every bit of data on that computer is lost forever.  This is not something I can afford to do.  The computer in question has no backup  We are poor and cannot afford this loss.

 

~*Dari



#9 AdagioBoognish

AdagioBoognish

  • Members
  • 111 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:[ PDX ]
  • Local time:04:14 AM

Posted 10 September 2013 - 03:11 AM

Well, there's a problem with that -- this computer has no backup.  So if the drive is bad, it won't boot off the CD, and that means the computer won't EVER boot again, every bit of data on that computer is lost forever.  This is not something I can afford to do.  The computer in question has no backup  We are poor and cannot afford this loss.

 

~*Dari

 

Dari, it sounds like your data is not going to be lost at all. What platypus is recommending is a simple trouble shooting procedure to test your cd/dvd drive. If you follow the steps and your computer is not able to boot from the disk drive then it confirms that the problem is with the disk drive and not your operating system or windows media player. After you test the disk drive you can always go back into your bios screen and change it back to boot from hard drive. If your computer cannot boot from a cd/dvd, it does not mean that the computer will never boot again. The trouble shooting steps are completely reversible and don't pose a threat to your hard drive and important data. 



#10 DariRyu

DariRyu
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 44 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:14 AM

Posted 10 September 2013 - 07:37 AM

I will go about arranging this, then.  Unfortunately this computer is not mine and the person who does own the computer is extremely reluctant to do something like that.  We aren't by any means experienced enough to do this.  I will talk to him about it, though.  How does one go into the BIOS if the computer does not boot, though?  In fact, how does one go into the BIOS at all?  I did not know that was possible without specialized equipment.

 

~*Dari


Edited by DariRyu, 10 September 2013 - 07:38 AM.


#11 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 13,991 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:09:14 PM

Posted 10 September 2013 - 08:42 AM

Indeed the idea to boot up from a CD or DVD is a temporary measure to test the drive.

 

Most computers indicate on the screen when starting up, showing something like "Press F2 for setup" or "F9 Select boot device"

 

If there's an option to make a one-off boot selection, you can try the CD/DVD, then next start will go back to using the hard drive. If there's only an option to enter the BIOS setup, once you have seen if it can boot from the optical disk, reboot and enter the BIOS setup once again to set the first boot device back to hard drive.

 

It is possible the system is already set to boot from an optical disk if one is there and is bootable - if so, the system will try to boot from the CD/DVD when there is a disc in the drive when it's powered up, and might request a keypress to boot from CD. Most systems aren't set up this way because it makes them take longer to get started.


Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#12 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,365 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:04:14 AM

Posted 10 September 2013 - 08:44 AM

If you change the boot order in the BIOS so that the CD/DVD-ROM is the first device and the hdd the second device the computer will boot from the hdd if the optical drive fails.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users