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Upgrade gone horribly wrong...Please help!


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#1 TripleDigitRide

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 09:29 PM

I'm going to make this as to the point as possible.

 

Started with a factory HP desktop with windows 7. Decided to have. Decided to up grade. Only things (as far as I know) that's still factory are the DVD player and hard drive. New motherboard is MSI.

 

The guy who built it called to inform me that upon booting after the build, Windows 7 was no longer recognized. He told me that I would need to pay for a Windows 7 upgrade disk in order to get things up and running. Everything seemed fine at time of pick-up.

 

I got home and began messing with it, but noticed an issue with downloading Google Chrome. Was receiving an error message that mentioned something about my profile not being able to be opened correctly. My first mistake was trying to fix this issue.

 

I watched some YouTube videos about this issue, then began following the directions to the best of my less than stellar ability. This is where things get even worse.

 

I began making changes to things that I'm pretty sure I shouldn't have. The next few hours was a blur. Now for the biggest mistake.

 

I decided that I'd just try to use the System Image disks (7 of them) that I created when first purchasing the PC a few years ago. I think I killed it.

Upon rebooting, I get the MSI screen, but Windows will not boot. The "system" decided to take a shot at fixing itself, followed by an attempted factory system image. Doesn't appear said system is much smarter than myself.

 

 I then decided that if he simply installed the Windows 7 update disk to solve the problem, so would I. But how am I supposed to do that if Windows won't boot?

 

As you can tell, I'm far from an expert, but I did attempt Safe Mode, but none of the 4 options would work.

 

Is there any hope? What can I do?

 

Thank you in advance.


Edited by TripleDigitRide, 01 September 2013 - 09:30 PM.


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#2 Platypus

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 11:45 PM

I agree with your thinking that another installation of the Windows 7 upgrade is the way to revert to the successful configuration. Restoration from the restore set belonging to the original system cannot be applied to the new hardware.

 

The installation from the upgrade disc will give you nothing but Windows, and you will have to source any necessary drivers and install all updates and other necessary security measures such as anti-virus. But that would also largely apply to a restoration of the original ex-factory setup.

 

To do a clean install from the upgrade disc, you'll need to boot from the upgrade DVD, using whatever key or key combination your mainboard requires to select boot order. This is usually displayed as a prompt on screen during boot-up. You may be able to make a one-off choice to boot from the DVD, or you might need to enter the BIOS setup screen and temporarily set the first boot device to be the DVD drive.

 

When the system starts up the Windows installer, choose to do a Custom Installation and to format the hard drive (or if the drive is divided into more than one partition, format and install to the partition where the old Windows is currently installed. A quick format is all that is required if that option is presented.)

 

Supply the product key belonging to the Windows 7 upgrade, not the original HP one from the COA sticker on the computer case. The faulty restored Windows will be replaced with a fresh Windows 7 which will need to be activated and updated.

 

Depending on the mainboard's LAN adapter, you might need to download and install the LAN driver for the mainboard model from the MSI support site before the system can go online. However you should have already obtained a suitable anti-virus to also install on the system before spending any time online. One of the free AVs like Avast or MSE is perfectly acceptable.


Edited by Platypus, 01 September 2013 - 11:50 PM.

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#3 TripleDigitRide

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 08:45 AM

When the system starts up the Windows installer, choose to do a Custom Installation and to format the hard drive (or if the drive is divided into more than one partition, format and install to the partition where the old Windows is currently installed. A quick format is all that is required if that option is presented.)


First of all, thank you for taking the time to help me with this issue. It is greatly appreciated.

I do need a little help with the above quoted section. It is my understanding that my hard drive is partitioned into two sections; one large section, and one smaller section that stores files and whatever else normally gets stored there.

I am sorry for my ignorance on the subject, but I need a little more clarification/direction with this step. I don't want to screw it up any more than I already have.

As far as the board goes, all I know is that it's an MSI. I believe the model number is 970A-G45 or MS-7693. Those are the two numbers I see on the manual.

Also, is it safe to assume that since I will need to change the boot order to run the
upgrade disk, I'll also need to change it back after I'm done?

Thank you again.

#4 Platypus

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 09:14 AM

If you press F11 when the screen prompt is shown, this will access the boot menu alone, and you will be able to select a one-off boot from the DVD. If you pressed Esc to enter the BIOS setup and changed the boot order there, you would need to change it back later.

 

You can access downloads for drivers and instruction manual(s) here:

 

http://www.msi.com/product/mb/970A-G45.html

 

It's hard to tell exactly how your hard drive will currently be partitioned. Since you used the HP restore discs, I suspect it has a large system partition and a small recovery partition, but that's not certain. It will do no harm to begin the installation sequence and see what options the Windows installer offers for what it finds on the drive. You can always escape from the initial stages and shut the computer off without making any changes. If you feel uncertain you can note down the partition options you see and post them here. Even if you started an installation and it turned out to be wrong, you won't be any worse off except for time spent.


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#5 ranchhand1

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 08:40 AM

It is my understanding that my hard drive is partitioned into two sections; one large section, and one smaller section that stores files and whatever else normally gets stored there.

Just a bit of clarification.... when you partition, assuming that you want only a single partition for your hard drive, Windows will want a small partition for its own use, say a few megs (not gigs), so you actually will see two partitions after it is finished, one very large into which you will format to NTFS and install Windows, and one very small and unformatted which you will not mess with. Just a thought. :cowboy:



#6 chrisd87

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 09:31 AM

When you do a clean installation of Windows 7, it will install a partition I believe is 100mb just for windows to perform faster. Then you will have  your main partition which will be the rest of your hdd space.


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#7 TripleDigitRide

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 09:31 PM

OK, I got the PC to boot from the DVD, and the Windows 7 Upgrade disk is in. As I think I mentioned before, Windows 7 was already installed prior to the hardware upgrades. I chose Custom (advanced), because I would like to start over fresh, if at all possible.  I have a feeling that I may have messed with some files and setting that I shouldn't have, so I want to start over as clean as possible.

 

Here is what I am seeing on the screen, but I don't know what to do next.

 

zw6m.jpg



#8 Platypus

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 09:55 PM

I would choose to format the 97.7GB OS partition (eliminating the current faulty Windows) and install the fresh Win 7 to that partition. After Windows is installed and operating correctly, you can create one or more partitions in the unallocated space to store your data.

 

When the installer offers you options, you can determine the correct selection from the partition sizes. The command line installer interface may not show the exact same size as Windows uses, but it will be similar enough.

 

Since the recovery partition is of no value, before you create a data partition in Windows Drive Management, you could delete the recovery partition and it would add to the unallocated space available to create a storage partition.


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#9 TripleDigitRide

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 10:01 PM

I would choose to format the 97.7GB OS partition (eliminating the current faulty Windows) and install the fresh Win 7 to that partition. After Windows is installed and operating correctly, you can create one or more partitions in the unallocated space to store your data.

 

When the installer offers you options, you can determine the correct selection from the partition sizes. The command line installer interface may not show the exact same size as Windows uses, but it will be similar enough.

 

Since the recovery partition is of no value, before you create a data partition in Windows Drive Management, you could delete the recovery partition and it would add to the unallocated space available to create a storage partition.

 

Again, I apologize for my ignorance on the subject, but I almost need step-by-step instructions.

 

If I keep Disk 0 Partition 2: OS, do I delete the other 3 options? If so, after deleting those, do I simply click on the Disk 0 Partition 2: OS, then click Format?



#10 Platypus

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 05:06 AM

Sorry, I noticed your post at work on my lunch break, and parts of my hurried response would apply to Windows XP...

 

No need to bother about any of the other partitions at this stage, as you say, choose the Disk 0 Partition 2: OS, then Format.


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#11 TripleDigitRide

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 08:32 AM

Got this message:

 

Windows cannot be installed on this disk. The selected disk has an MBR partition table. On EFI systems, Windows can only be installed on GPT disks. 

 

What now?



#12 chrisd87

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 08:48 AM

See if you have the option to deselect EFI Boot disk in BIOS Boot order so that you can install to an MBR HD.

If not you'll have to convert HD to GPT then follow these steps to install with an EFI BIOS:

 

Step1

 Convert MBR Disk to GPT Disk
 

Step2

UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) - Install Windows 7 with - Windows 7 Forums

 

Here is a post by a user having the same problem as you, and what he did to fix it.

 


Easy fix to this problem:

I also got the message: "Windows cannot be installed to this disk. The selected disk has an MBR partition table. The EFI systems, Windows can only be installed to GPT disks"

My system BIOS as well as some others may have a boot order that has 1st Your DVD drive (possibly stating manufacturers name) as legacy or IDE and 2nd Your same DVD drive in UEFI mode as the second boot device (or visa versa). Some other forums ( I can't remember which one works between legacy or UEFI) suggest changing your 1st boot device from the one DVD mode type to the other or reversing them.

While this may work there may be a more simple method if you can notice or detect the mode switch during the boot sequence.

Simple Fix Before realizing this I noticed that durring the boot process you can (maybe just on some systems and not all), at least on the Biostar I was building, see the switch from the one DVD mode type to the other by means of seeing the words "Press any key to boot from DVD" move to another location on the screen. I simply ignored the first flash of those words and clicked a key to boot from the DVD when I noticed the words flash again a second time in a different location. The Windows 7 then installed as before without problem.


Edited by chrisd87, 06 September 2013 - 08:51 AM.

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#13 TripleDigitRide

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 09:18 AM

OK. Windows is installing. We'll see what happens from here. While I'll undoubtedly need more assistance before this is all said and done, I would like to thank those of you who have helped me thus far. It is greatly appreciated. Stay tuned...



#14 TripleDigitRide

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 09:50 AM

Windows appears to have installed, but now it's telling me the Product Key is not valid. Errrrrrrrr! It was working when I brought it home a few days ago, before I screwed it up..



#15 chrisd87

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 10:12 AM

You can do the activation by phone. Call the number that it gives you and deal with the automated system. It will give you a code to type in. Type it in, and it should activate.


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