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data recovery from shock damaged ext HDD


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#1 jbp1157

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 05:58 AM

Samsung 500Gb suffered a small fall against a hard surface (oops)

Have tried parted magic in both mount and recover modes with no joy foll;owing these suggestions from James Litten - Many thanks for this.

 

http://html5.litten.com/how-to-fix-external-disk-drive-suddenly-became-raw/

 

http://fixit.litten.com/linuxfilecopy.html

 

The drive reads as RAW when connected to a Win 7 PC

 

No attempts have been made to write data and alternate recovery tools such as easus and file scavenger have been unsuccessful.

 

Current status:

using partedmagic in test disk mode I have performed a deeper search and had a warning that the data is unreadable. I am in process of retrying the "deeper search" mode again. Hope over expectation but sometimes...

 

Anyway am I going to have to open this one up and do surgery? Advice and guidance would be much appreciated..

 

Thanks

 

JBP



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#2 jbp1157

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 09:35 AM

Thanks for that, can you tell me a bit more about it/them and how you have used this in a similar situation to mine at all please? Does anyone have any comment or thoughts on this issue at all please?

 

Thankss

JBP



#3 jbp1157

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 09:52 AM

Downloaded the trial version and can't say I'm overly impressed with it TBH. The interface doesn't help me distinguish between the multiple HDD's attached to my system.


Edited by jbp1157, 27 August 2013 - 09:52 AM.


#4 mainer21

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 11:33 AM

Take a look at Ddrescue.
http://savannah.gnu.org/projects/ddrescue/

Some good reading here also.
http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Damaged_Hard_Disk

Edited by mainer21, 27 August 2013 - 11:54 AM.


#5 dpunisher

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 02:18 PM

You dropped it.  It didn't mysteriously become RAW.  You physically damaged it.

 

Trying all of these recovery programs is just thrashing your drive with its damaged platters and/or heads, and likely causing more damage and making a real recovery harder.

 

Either get another external housing/hard drive dock and give it another shot (in the off chance you damaged the housing electronics), or find someone to properly recover your data.

 

Just an opinion, I could be wrong............but likely not.


I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#6 jbp1157

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 03:14 PM

You dropped it.  It didn't mysteriously become RAW.  You physically damaged it.

 

Trying all of these recovery programs is just thrashing your drive with its damaged platters and/or heads, and likely causing more damage and making a real recovery harder.

 

Either get another external housing/hard drive dock and give it another shot (in the off chance you damaged the housing electronics), or find someone to properly recover your data.

 

Just an opinion, I could be wrong............but likely not.

 Whilst i thank you for taking the time to read my post I didn't say "mysteriously damaged", I am fully aware of what caused the damage; "the fall". If your comment relates to the "shock" element of my post title, I simply meant the bang it received when it fell on to the floor.

 

I accept your commentary about continued attempts to read the drive and the potential to damagage (possibly irreperably) the drive. Hence why I came here seeking the input of more knowledgeable people than myself. I have tested the housing electronics and they are fine and I had already done this before you commented. I could have been a little clearer on that and I apologise if this confused you into thinking you were dealing with a rude fool.

 

As to getting someone else to recover my data, what steps might they take that I can not take myself? I am willing to invest time in reading and learning about the subject so as to increase my knowledge and chances of success.

 

Of course if you are such a person anmd would be willing to help guide me along an alternate route please do so.


Edited by jbp1157, 27 August 2013 - 03:15 PM.


#7 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 06:38 PM

One thing that specialist recovery businesses can do that you can't, is dismantle an HD in a clean room and spin up the platters out of their casing. A friend of mine had to have this done when the HD in her computer died totally, with all her family photos on it.

 

As I don't know where you live, try googling for companies who do this. But it is expensive, it cost her over £UK 400. However, with a physically damaged drive this may be your last option if a replacement enclosure doesn't work.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#8 dpunisher

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 09:12 PM

I do admit my remarks were a bit curt, but accurate.

 

When you drop a hard drive, and you experience the symptoms you have experienced, then that is when you stop running diags and recovery programs on it and look forward to data preservation (1st priority), then recovery.  I deal with this a lot on laptops, and it never ceases to amaze me that people run their damaged hard drives into the ground after initial damage, then bring them to me expecting a miracle.

 

As Chris posted above, it becomes expensive as someone has to disassemble the hard drive, pull the platters, and reinstall them in another housing with good heads.  Vice versa, it might possible to swap out the heads/actuator into the present housing.  Having a clean room is highly recommended.  Just a piece of dust can wreck a head, likewise a small defect in a platter caused by a head slapping it can wreak havoc as well.  Also it is usually necessary to have a matching firmware and controller to your present setup.  Multiple platters- maintaining alignment is essential.  Once you lose alignment, recovery just got a lot closer to impossible.  It is difficult to do your own data recovery when it involves cracking open the hard drive.  Swapping controller boards is fairly easy, but likely not your problem.

 

I have been through data recovery 2 or 3 times for clients.  The cheapest job (Hitachi 2.5" laptop drive) was ~$800US, and I had one estimate go to $1200. 

 

I am a huge believer in docking stations as they tend to not be moved around as much as enclosures.  


I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#9 jbp1157

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 03:22 AM

One thing that specialist recovery businesses can do that you can't, is dismantle an HD in a clean room and spin up the platters out of their casing. A friend of mine had to have this done when the HD in her computer died totally, with all her family photos on it.

 

As I don't know where you live, try googling for companies who do this. But it is expensive, it cost her over £UK 400. However, with a physically damaged drive this may be your last option if a replacement enclosure doesn't work.

 

Chris Cosgrove

Chris,

Yes I agree that a specialist shop could do that, and so can I as I use a positively pressurised clean room in my own work. I am used to working on small things and taking care of them as I do. Perhaps you could point me to a good "how to guide" on this subject. As I understand it I need the same case and duplicate PCB, or as near as I can get to the original. Is that also correct?

 

Thank you for your comments if you can add anything further I'd appreciate it.



#10 jbp1157

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 03:27 AM

I do admit my remarks were a bit curt, but accurate.

 

When you drop a hard drive, and you experience the symptoms you have experienced, then that is when you stop running diags and recovery programs on it and look forward to data preservation (1st priority), then recovery.  I deal with this a lot on laptops, and it never ceases to amaze me that people run their damaged hard drives into the ground after initial damage, then bring them to me expecting a miracle.

 

As Chris posted above, it becomes expensive as someone has to disassemble the hard drive, pull the platters, and reinstall them in another housing with good heads.  Vice versa, it might possible to swap out the heads/actuator into the present housing.  Having a clean room is highly recommended.  Just a piece of dust can wreck a head, likewise a small defect in a platter caused by a head slapping it can wreak havoc as well.  Also it is usually necessary to have a matching firmware and controller to your present setup.  Multiple platters- maintaining alignment is essential.  Once you lose alignment, recovery just got a lot closer to impossible.  It is difficult to do your own data recovery when it involves cracking open the hard drive.  Swapping controller boards is fairly easy, but likely not your problem.

 

I have been through data recovery 2 or 3 times for clients.  The cheapest job (Hitachi 2.5" laptop drive) was ~$800US, and I had one estimate go to $1200. 

 

I am a huge believer in docking stations as they tend to not be moved around as much as enclosures.  

Forum Addict, thanks I agree with you both and as I responded to chris I do have a reasonable size clean room. I can understand why data recovery costs so much and that is why I'd like to do this myself. I am reasonably confident though not an expert. If you can suggest a good how to guide possibly with tooling recommendations jigs etc I'd be happy to have a go and report back.

 

NB as you say docks are good and I do use them. I have dropped a disk when I removed it from one but fortunately no damage was done. Always interested in the set up that others have. For my main dock I use a startech duplicator dock. and on a secondary machine I use a standard cheapo ebay SATA/IDE dock. Do you have any thoughts on particularly good ones to use at all?

 

JBP



#11 dpunisher

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Posted 28 August 2013 - 09:09 AM

As far as "how to", go to YouTube and search "platter exchange tool".  Lots of how to videos.  Budget for a good set of mini Torx and Hex bits, or better yet a set of Eklind or Wiha drivers.  Cheap ones do strip out/break. Can't even imagine the hassle of stripping out the last screw when you are pulling platters off the motor.  I don't see why you can't do it yourself if you have the clean room and the tools.  Patience and research go a long way.

 

Docks- I had a Startech ESATA/USB 2.0 dock, but it rarely gets used any more.  I have 3 USB 3.0 docks (1 duplicator) that actually work with less hassle than the ESATA dock.  I maybe move a hard drive to another dock twice a year, otherwise they stay put. 


I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#12 Gemmy Johnson

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 07:41 PM

Hai, Did anybody heard of Remo Recover?



#13 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 06:37 PM

I am truly impressed - it is not everyone that has their own, personal, private clean room !

 

Can I make a suggestion ?

 

Before you start dismantling this hard drive that has valuable data on it, practice on a drive or two that are effectively scrap !

 

I would have to say that this sort of operation iis way beyond my pay grade !

 

Chris Cosgrove






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