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Cannot start Windows w/ Original HD & New HD -- Win not genuine


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#1 elguapo79

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Posted 14 August 2013 - 04:50 PM

My apologies on the title. It's hard to put this symptom succinctly. Also, I wasn't sure if this belonged in the Win7 section or the upgrade hardware section.

 

 

 

I upgraded to a 1 TB WD HDD by cloning it with the supplied software (Acronis True Image WD Edition).

 

All went well, but the old drive had letters C and D (D being a recovery partition). I wanted the new drive to have them.

 

I couldn't rename them using disk manager, so I did so in regedit.

 

Once I did that, if I leave the old drive connected, I come to a screen that says my Windows 7 copy is not genuine.

 

If I disconnect the old drive, all is well. I was hoping to format it and keep it in as a secondary drive since it's a pain to physically take it out.

 

Thank you for any guidance you can provide!

 

 

 

 

Other info:

HP Media Center PC

32 bit Windows 7

4 GB RAM

Intel Core2 Duo  CPU, E6550 2.33GHz



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 16 August 2013 - 08:12 PM

This is probably a dirty solution, but it has always worked for me and I have never blown a drive up yet. Yes, I know - there's always a first time !

 

Your computer is a standard tower. Take the side off it and disconnect the data lead to the old HDD, then boot it. Once booted, re-connect the data lead and you should be able to format this drive. this gets round the problem of it not booting with the two drives connected.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 elguapo79

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Posted 16 August 2013 - 08:54 PM

Thank you, Chris. I was considering trying this just today. Was wondering if I would blow anything up by attempting this.

 

If successful, a definite solution to my problem.

 

Thanks again -- will report back with results! :)



#4 hamluis

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 12:38 PM

FWIW:  Drive letters on an OEM system with a hidden partition or multiple partitions...is really unimportant.

 

When the system boots, the drive reflecting Windows is always...always the C: partition/drive.  Windows is designed that way.  When viewed from within Windows, any other partition will have a letter assigned other than C:.

 

If you have changed the boot order in the BIOS...to reflect the new drive as the designated first boot device...it should not matter if your old drive is connected or not...nor should it matter if it reflects Windows or not.

 

Louis



#5 elguapo79

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 07:21 PM

Thank you for the info.

 

I may be misunderstanding what you said --

 

However, that's what was confusing me. It seemed as if the computer was still running windows off the old drive when both were connected. They were clones of one another at that point. The little windows logo was on the old drive still.  That's why I (foolishly) tried to re-lable the old one, which is apparently what got me into my minor problem here. I was afraid to just format the old drive because I wasn't convinced that I'd be all set booting with just the new one. Dumb, of course, because I knew that it worked fine when I only had the new one.

 

Anywho, I have yet to try to format the old one, but I will when I get the chance without potential help from my little ones.  



#6 hamluis

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 10:26 AM

When...you have two or more partitions reflecting Windows...it is the designated boot drive which determines which system boots.

 

Example:  I have 2 hard drives attached to this system.  I have clones of both Win 7 and XP (my dual-boot) on each.  If I select (in the BIOS) to boot from hard drive A, I get a boot choice of XP and Win 7...which dates back to the time I cloned drive A.  If I indicate that I want hard drive B to be my first boot option...I get a boot choice of XP and Win 7...which is more current because that's the one that I use daily.

 

I have to indicate in the BIOS...which drive is the boot drive...in order to boot into whichever set of O/Ses I want to.  It's the same with two hard drives with one O/S, where A or B is a "copy" of the other.  The system will boot from either drive, but the current status of the O/Ses will not be the same.

 

In any case...whichever O/S I boot into...that partition/drive will be the C: partition for that instance.  If I boot into a different version of Windows, whether on that drive or on a different drive...then the new version booted into becomes C: and the drive letters for all other partitions may change, as viewed from that O/S.  This is perfectly normal.
 

C: is not permanently assigned to a given partition...when the system reflects more than 1 bootable version of Windows.  Whichever version booted into...is always C:.  When the system reflects only 1 bootable version of Windows...then the partition containing that version...is always C: because C: is nothing but a designation of partition which has been (or will be) booted into.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 18 August 2013 - 10:30 AM.





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