Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Ethernet Splitter?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 Goomba

Goomba

  • Members
  • 123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:17 AM

Posted 13 August 2013 - 06:51 PM

Hello there.

 

I basically have an ethernet cord ran under my house from my router to my PC. I also use another ethernet cord and connect the two via a connector to plug it into my Xbox 360. However, the problem is I can only use one at a time; my PC or my 360. Now, is there a way to use a splitter like these; http://www.pccables.com/02235.html?gclid=CI7h2OHJ-7gCFbCDQgodqSoAdw and http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=961428&is=REG&Q=&A=details ?

 

I read that these wouldn't work properly because of the TCP/IP protocols.

I've enclosed a diagram illustrating my current situation. If a splitter wouldn't work, what would be the best way to have them both connected simultaneously without having to run another cable under the house?

Thanks.

Attached Files



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 noknojon

noknojon

  • Banned
  • 10,871 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:05:17 PM

Posted 13 August 2013 - 07:16 PM

Hi -

Dumb but simple option (not mentioned above).

How many Ethernet outlets from your Router (Modem) ?

Mine has 4 outlet plugs on the side and I can link more than 1 computer directly to it -

 

Just an idea ........



#3 Goomba

Goomba
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:17 AM

Posted 13 August 2013 - 08:21 PM

Hi -

Dumb but simple option (not mentioned above).

How many Ethernet outlets from your Router (Modem) ?

Mine has 4 outlet plugs on the side and I can link more than 1 computer directly to it -

 

Just an idea ........

I have enough, but the problem is that I would have to run another 50ft+ cord under the house, which I can't do at the moment. My room is VERY far from the router.


Edited by Goomba, 13 August 2013 - 08:22 PM.


#4 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 13 August 2013 - 08:36 PM

Hello there.
 
I basically have an ethernet cord ran under my house from my router to my PC. I also use another ethernet cord and connect the two via a connector to plug it into my Xbox 360. However, the problem is I can only use one at a time; my PC or my 360. Now, is there a way to use a splitter like these; http://www.pccables.com/02235.html?gclid=CI7h2OHJ-7gCFbCDQgodqSoAdw and http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=961428&is=REG&Q=&A=details ?
 
I read that these wouldn't work properly because of the TCP/IP protocols.

I've enclosed a diagram illustrating my current situation. If a splitter wouldn't work, what would be the best way to have them both connected simultaneously without having to run another cable under the house?
Thanks.


No a splitter will not work.

What you want is a network switch. You plug the cable that runs under the house from the router into one of the switch ports. Then you use two of the other switch ports to run cables to the Xbox and PC. The switch with the work with the router to had the TCP/IP part of things.

This is what I use for a similar type purpose (my cable is not 50 ft...more like 15 feet at most):

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833122128

(I actually currently use the 8 port version, but had a 5 port in the past that my dad is currently using for a similar purpose)

There are other cheaper options, especially if you do not need Gigabit ports...the above is meant to be an example.

FWIW, a typical router is a combination of at least three different pieces of hardware: 1) an NAT router; 2) a WiFi access point; and 3) a network switch. When broadband routers originally came out (more than a decade ago), they typically did have the later two parts included. As result, there would only be ONE LAN port on a router even though the router would technically allow you to hook up more than one computer...just not physically. You typically then need to buy a switch or a hub to have more than one computer hooked up to the router. Initially the router was there to simply act as a firewall for that one computer. Fairly quickly, however, they started selling routers that included switches with several ports...thus physically allowing multiple computer to router. It was not until several years later that routers would start to also including WiFi access points.

I mention this to illustrate that you already have one switch on your network...the one built into your router. You can use additional switches to effectively add more ports to your network/router if you even run out of ports on your router (this is the other reason I use a switch).

#5 Goomba

Goomba
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:17 AM

Posted 14 August 2013 - 04:07 AM

Ah, alright. So what exactly would the "cheaper options" be? Obviously I would only need a switch with at least two RJ45 ports. I assume that I would want the Gigabit ports, as I would want the fastest possible connection available to reduce lag. I recently paid $40 for a USB wireless adapter for my PC in hopes of being able to be reliably connected to the internet on both machines but the WiFi was terrible.

Thanks for the insight.



#6 chrisd87

chrisd87

  • Members
  • 811 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 14 August 2013 - 10:37 AM

Unless I'm mistaken, wouldn't the switch still require having to run the 50+ feet of cable? If you already have a router, then there is no need to buy more equipment. Depending on the situation and the layout of the router and power, you can simply buy a powerline adapter kit and run the connection off of your power.


"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#7 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:01 PM

Unless I'm mistaken, wouldn't the switch still require having to run the 50+ feet of cable? If you already have a router, then there is no need to buy more equipment. Depending on the situation and the layout of the router and power, you can simply buy a powerline adapter kit and run the connection off of your power.

 

It is my understanding that the original poster already has run one "50+ feet of (ethernet) cable" under the house...but does not want to run a second one for the second device.  If so, then all that is needed is an ethernet network switch.

 

And I don't know how you define "no need to buy more equipment", but won't buying a powerline adapter kit be buying more equipment?   :wink:  And a powerline kit is going to cost just as much, if not more, than an ethernet switch.



#8 chrisd87

chrisd87

  • Members
  • 811 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:20 PM

Then how are you going to run the second device to the switch if he buys one without having to run more cable?


"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#9 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:22 PM

Ah, alright. So what exactly would the "cheaper options" be? Obviously I would only need a switch with at least two RJ45 ports. I assume that I would want the Gigabit ports, as I would want the fastest possible connection available to reduce lag. I recently paid $40 for a USB wireless adapter for my PC in hopes of being able to be reliably connected to the internet on both machines but the WiFi was terrible.

Thanks for the insight.


I meant cheaper ethernet switch options besides the example that I linked to. Just go to the likes of Newegg or Amazon and search for ethernet switch. You will some the will be about $20 bucks or even down close to $12 or so. The ones about $20 will typically have Fast Ethernet (i.e. 100 Mbps) rather than Gigabit ethernet. To get Gigabit ethernet, you are likely going to be in the $30 range.

Unless you are transferring files between the devices connected to the switch and another computer directly connect to the router, you will not see much benefit to Gigabit ethernet over Fast Ethernet. It is still relatively rare that someone's Internet connection will make a Fast Ethernet connection on the local network the bottleneck. And most streaming services from a computer to the likes of say an Xbox or other media adapter or even another computer will be just fine on Fast Ethernet. I am not saying this to say that Gigabit is a bad choice, but more so that you realize that going to Gigabit will only really have benefits in very specific areas. Personally, I want/need Gigabit on my key pieces because I use a NAS for my main file storage and backup and it uses Gigabit. Thus, since I am doing direct file transfers to the NAS from my computers, I benefit from Gigabit. For my other "uses" (i.e. Internet browsing and streaming from my computers to an Apple TV, etc), the Gigabit does not really help.

And even if you want to make use of Gigabit, then both computers/devices and everything in between the two computers/devices need to support Gigabit Ethernet. That means your router will need to have Gigabit ethernet ports. All the ethernet cables (including the 50+ ft one you installed) need to be at least a Cat 5e cable or Cat 6 cables. And both computers/devices need to have Gigabit ports.

And typically the minimum number of ports for switches is about 4 or 5.

#10 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 14 August 2013 - 12:27 PM

Then how are you going to run the second device to the switch if he buys one without having to run more cable?


My understanding is that both devices...i.e. the Xbox and the PC are in the same nominal location/room. In other words, the original poster already has the one 50+ ft ethernet cable running to the location where the Xbox and PC is located. At the moment, in order to use one or the other, the original poster has to unplug the existing one cable from one device and plug it into the other device.

The key point as I understand is that if a switch was installed at the location of the Xbox and PC, then there would be no need to run another cable under the house. Yes, there would need to be two cables coming from the switch to the PC and Xbox, but as I understand it, since the switch would at least nominally be in the same location as the PC and Xbox, there no need for either of those cables to run under the house.

#11 Goomba

Goomba
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 123 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:03:17 AM

Posted 15 August 2013 - 02:58 AM

Yes, you are correct Smax. I just need to find the most ideal way to be able connect my ethernet cord under the house to the cord connected to my 360 AND somehow branch it off into my PC at the same time.



#12 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 15 August 2013 - 07:44 AM

Yes, you are correct Smax. I just need to find the most ideal way to be able connect my ethernet cord under the house to the cord connected to my 360 AND somehow branch it off into my PC at the same time.


That would be an ethernet switch. That is precisely the situation a switch is basically meant for. A switch is in essence the ethernet equivalent/"version" of a splitter.

#13 chrisd87

chrisd87

  • Members
  • 811 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 15 August 2013 - 08:57 AM

Yes, you are correct Smax. I just need to find the most ideal way to be able connect my ethernet cord under the house to the cord connected to my 360 AND somehow branch it off into my PC at the same time.

 

The only way I see it is to run the 360 to the switch, run the pc to the switch, and then run the switch to your router. Essentially if you already have a router that supports multiple connections, then just run the cable. From looking at your diagram that you posted, it looks like the pc and 360 are not in the same room. The switch will have to be hooked up to the router to provide Ethernet to your devices, so either way you look at it you're going to have to run cable for that to work.

 

This is just my opinion and I'm sure Smax will correct me :thumbup2:


Edited by chrisd87, 15 August 2013 - 08:57 AM.

"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#14 smax013

smax013

  • BC Advisor
  • 2,329 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 15 August 2013 - 09:22 AM

Yes, you are correct Smax. I just need to find the most ideal way to be able connect my ethernet cord under the house to the cord connected to my 360 AND somehow branch it off into my PC at the same time.

 
The only way I see it is to run the 360 to the switch, run the pc to the switch, and then run the switch to your router. Essentially if you already have a router that supports multiple connections, then just run the cable. From looking at your diagram that you posted, it looks like the pc and 360 are not in the same room. The switch will have to be hooked up to the router to provide Ethernet to your devices, so either way you look at it you're going to have to run cable for that to work.
 
This is just my opinion and I'm sure Smax will correct me :thumbup2:


Yes.

As I understand it, the ethernet cable under the house from the router and the ethernet cable to the Xbox already exist (they are currently connected by a "splice" type connector piece, but I could be wrong. If so, then the ethernet cable under house would go from the router to the switch and the second ethernet cable that exists for the Xbox would go from the switch to the Xbox 360. Then there would need to be one more ethernet cable (which might already exist) that goes from the switch to the PC.

#15 chrisd87

chrisd87

  • Members
  • 811 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC
  • Local time:02:17 AM

Posted 15 August 2013 - 09:41 AM

 

 

Yes, you are correct Smax. I just need to find the most ideal way to be able connect my ethernet cord under the house to the cord connected to my 360 AND somehow branch it off into my PC at the same time.

 
The only way I see it is to run the 360 to the switch, run the pc to the switch, and then run the switch to your router. Essentially if you already have a router that supports multiple connections, then just run the cable. From looking at your diagram that you posted, it looks like the pc and 360 are not in the same room. The switch will have to be hooked up to the router to provide Ethernet to your devices, so either way you look at it you're going to have to run cable for that to work.
 
This is just my opinion and I'm sure Smax will correct me :thumbup2:

 


Yes.

As I understand it, the ethernet cable under the house from the router and the ethernet cable to the Xbox already exist (they are currently connected by a "splice" type connector piece, but I could be wrong. If so, then the ethernet cable under house would go from the router to the switch and the second ethernet cable that exists for the Xbox would go from the switch to the Xbox 360. Then there would need to be one more ethernet cable (which might already exist) that goes from the switch to the PC.

 

That will work as well, just have to wait and see what he replies back with as to how he has it set up. He said they are in the same room, so if that's the case then your suggestion will work fine.

 

Also just another suggestion, but if your PC has dual lan ports on your motherboard, then you can use your PC to run Ethernet to your 360.


Edited by chrisd87, 15 August 2013 - 09:47 AM.

"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users