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Java not secure??


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#1 Moe_P

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 02:04 PM

Hi, I would like your input on Java, I read on a different forum that it should be removed from the computer because it is not secure.  Thanks


Edited by hamluis, 11 August 2013 - 03:00 PM.
Moved from XP to AV, Firewall, etc. - Hamluis.

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#2 .X.

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 02:14 PM

If you need it to run some programs it should be fine as long as you disable Java in the browser. If you don't have any programs dependent on it, uninstall it.

 

rWaOw1D.png

 

 



#3 hamluis

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 02:58 PM

I have run with it this year...I have run without it...I've not noticed any difference whichever I chose to do.  Subsequently, reinstalled it :).

 

Realistically...every time that you are on the Web...whether you have just Windows...java...or any other application facilitating movement on the Web...there are vulnerabilities.  That's why Windows has a constant stream of critical updates...java has a constant stream of updates...your AV program has a constant stream of updates,,,and every tool which is designed to neutralize/overcome malware that lands on the system...is constantly being updated/refined.

 

Remember the myth that Macs did not have the security vulnerabilities that Windows has?  Well, that has been recanted/debunked, whatever you want to call it.

 

IMO...it's the user, not the system, not the O/S, not all the safeguards preached or attempted to embed in the user brain...that's the big security leak that nio one can patch.  My classic example would be those who choose to greet the possibility of malware...with open arms...by using torrents as a "free" source of illegal programs, never once thinking that those torrents may bear unwanted/unanticipated "gifts" in the form of malware.

 

Java is not the problem, it's just another wall in the circle of defenses...that isn't perfect.  By the way...none of the other walls are perfect, either :). unless a user just decides he/she is not going to access the Internet :).

 

Louis



#4 quietman7

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 03:38 PM

Why You don't need Java
W3Techs usage statistics and market share data of Java on the web

If you're going to use Java, many security researchers and computer security organizations caution users to limit their usage by disabling Java Plug-ins or add-ons in common web browsers as .X. has indicated.

Also make sure you are always using the most current version because older versions have vulnerabilities that malicious sites can use to exploit and infect your system. In fact, older unpatched versions of other popular software like Adobe (Reader, Flash Player, Shockwave Player) Apple iTunes, Quick Time, VLC Media Player all are vulnerable to exploits and require frequent updating or you increase the risk of system infection.
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#5 Moe_P

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 06:39 PM

Thank you for the quick and very informative reply's, since I don't believe I need it, I have removed it and disabled it in the browsers.

 

Moe


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#6 TsVk!

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 08:27 PM

It is required for some sites and games and stuff. I use NoScript plugin for Firefox which blocks Java and other stuff through my browser, but if I want I can allow a particular script.

 

There's funny places you wouldn't think it would be and you might miss it sometimes, if you completely uninstall it.



#7 quietman7

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Posted 12 August 2013 - 07:09 AM

Yes it's required for a small percentage of sites. I never installed Java on my Windows 7 machine and have never needed it.


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Posted 14 August 2013 - 11:46 PM

I see everyone has answered this and it's been resolved. I agree with all the above answers but can add one thing I've seen STOP those Java Drive by Exploits. Zero Vulnerability Labs created their "Exploit Shield" many months back. It was recently bought up by Malwarebytes, and is NOW Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit. I used it on my old XP and Windows 7. It works well even though it's in Beta Still. I would consider using this especially if you're on Windows. It just sits in the Tray and requires no attention.  They have a You Tube channel too that they used during Testing. http://www.zerovulnerabilitylabs.com/

http://www.youtube.com/user/ZeroVulnLabs

 

Yes, I turned off Java in browsers in Windows and Linux both. 



#9 quietman7

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 06:57 AM

As noteed by johnnydollar, Malwarebytes Anti-Exploit is a pre-release beta version of a product and not completely tested to ensure its stability or reliability.

What is beta software?

After an initial round of in-house testing, software publishers often release new programs to be tested by the public. These pre-release versions are called beta software, usually denoted by a "b" in the version number, e.g., Netscape Navigator 2.0b5. Since the publisher couldn't possibly test the software under all possible conditions, it is reasonable to expect that wider use of the software may uncover problems that were not discovered during in-house testing. The publisher expects to be notified when users find such problems so that the program can be fixed before its official release.

In general, you should expect to run into bugs whenever using any piece of beta software. These bugs may range in severity from minor features that don't work to problems that cause your computer to crash. You should decide whether the benefit of new features in a beta program outweighs the risk of program instability before choosing to use a piece of beta software. You should also be aware that UITS will not have thoroughly tested beta software, nor will the software be guaranteed by its maker, so you should not expect the same level of support as you would receive for an official release version of the program.


Beta version software is useful for internal demonstrations, testing and previews to select customers, but may be unstable and not yet ready for a release candidate stage. The goal of a beta program is to collect information regarding the performance, quality, stability, and functionality of new products in order to iron out the bugs before they are released to the general public. Beta software is not intended for inexperienced users since it may contain bugs ranging in severity from minor features not working properly to problems that may potentially damage your system. If you choose to use a beta program, you use it at your own risk.

For more information about beta programs and software release stages, please read Software release life cycle.
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