Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

IT Certs Vs 4 Year Degree


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 jmeadows

jmeadows

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:25 PM

Posted 09 August 2013 - 11:50 AM

Am I wasting my time getting certifications like network+ and security+ if I don't have a 4 year degree? Is it all or nothing?



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 BKSeoul

BKSeoul

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Local time:07:25 PM

Posted 12 August 2013 - 02:53 PM

It really depends.  Either are great things to have but what most companies like is experience for a few reasons.

1) They don't have to worry about you using them to learn and train and cover your costs for that and then move on for a bigger pay check

2) They know you can come in and mesh with their systems and SOP quickly

3) They can better judge your worth for how much to pay you.

 

I am a perfect example.  I have no formal degree, though I am close to an associates after going to college on and off again for 5 years or so now and plan to go 4 year degree in the long run.  I started on the sales side at Best Buy when it comes to Tech and took it upon myself to research the products I was pitching to people so that I was properly knowledgable as well as could help make the right suggestion and fit for them.  In doing so, I became the go to person for anything remotely beyond what was on the spec sheet in front of the computer when we had customers come in asking quesitons.  This forced me to stay on top of the latest trends in technology so I wouldn't be blind sided by a question.  In doing so, I naturally began to expand my knowledge.  I then built my first computer and moved into other areas of tech support on my own referenceing Google, YouTube (back when it was new), and books and magazines at my local colleges library.  This helped me expand and allowed me to get a job at Staples as the lead resident easy tech fixing computers alongside selling them.

I continued gaining experience until I was fortunate to get a job with Fujitsu as a Field Engineer servicing POS.  I did formal training with them and OJT until I was proficent.  From there I have since expanded and worked for Xerox and now Simplify in Telecommunications.

All of this and the only thing I got was a standard A+ cert for Fujitsu as a job requirement.

Now, all that being said...

 

The benefit of a cert and or a degree to go alongside your experience is your earning potential.  Sure, you could go the route I did and never get certs or degrees but you will find if you don't have the proper experience and lots of it (i.e. 5+ years of it) you are going to find it hard to find employeers look at your resume.  Additionally, if you are fortunate to get hired, your starting wage will be much lower and require numerous years before it builds up to a decent annual rate typically.  What the degree and certs provide is reinforcement to your experience to show an employer that you have trained and worked on whatever it is you are supporting.  It allows better job opportunities, better starting pay, and better year or year pending your performance in most cases.

 

It really all depends on what you want to do and get into.  What is your goal?  What do you want to do?



#3 chromebuster

chromebuster

  • Members
  • 899 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:the crazy city of Boston, In the North East reaches of New England
  • Local time:08:25 PM

Posted 23 August 2013 - 08:59 PM

I'm just struggling to get a job with a Bachelor's degree in English and a passion for technology; I'm going to try and find any old random job first till I can get certified and then maybe I'll get more technical positions opened up to me, for how can you get certified without experience and how can you get experience without a job; not counting personal experience considering that doesn't count mostly anyway, or does  it?  Toward certification?  I'm shooting for CompTIA A+ though I also want to go for an IT certificate from a college or university. 


The AccessCop Network is just me and my crew. 

Some call me The Queen of Cambridge


#4 whitedragon551

whitedragon551

  • Members
  • 53 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:07:25 PM

Posted 25 August 2013 - 01:11 PM

In my area employeers dont care about certifications. They would rather see real world experience. Just because you have a certification doesnt mean you know how to apply yourself in a specific situation. All certs show is you can study for a test.

 

I knew that companies in my area didnt care about certs, so instead of going to certs after I got my B.S Computer Information Systems degree I took a job as an intern. I busted my butt, and was brought on as a full time network engineer within 3 months of starting my internship. After I was brought on as a Network Engineer I was lowballed on my wage, but it was more than I was making as an intern so I negotiated up a little more and took it. Within 2 weeks of starting with the new company I had a raise to where I wanted to be paid. I realize this is not even close to the norm and most people struggle after getting their degrees to even find a job in their field.

 

My suggestion is look for an internship with a company you think you would fit in culture wise and just go in and do your best. Learn as much as you can and stay as long as you can. Take notes and ask questions. Volunteer for projects or try to be involved in meetings. Its always easier to find a job in your field once you have one. If you can show your employable it will be much easier to get an interview elsewhere.


Edited by whitedragon551, 25 August 2013 - 01:18 PM.

| Windows Firewall Control | Sophos Antivirus |

| Image for Windows v3.02 | Comodo Dome Shield |

| TysTechTalk.com |


#5 synergy513

synergy513

  • BC Advisor
  • 1,057 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Local time:07:25 PM

Posted 26 August 2013 - 05:07 AM

Affirmative. That first job is where you will have to swallow some pomegranate seeds until you get that one year of service in. Quite a few professions are that way. The ideal candidates will have their Undergrad degrees and their Credentials (insert here +). Once you get your year or two of experience in, you will find that you will be quite desirable in the market and you will probably be able to pick and choose what you want to do.

 

 And always keep in mind, those positions that can't be done overseas and have to be executed domestically is where the future is at.

 

 Most of the time what i see in the field is that those individuals carrying their Bachelors degrees are more desirable  not only due to corporate HR policy, but those individuals have committed themselves and finished their curriculum no matter how many obstacles they had to overcome whether it be personal or academic or both. In other words, they worked their butt off.


Moore's Law : 4d Graph in Progress


#6 BKSeoul

BKSeoul

  • Members
  • 59 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Houston, TX
  • Local time:07:25 PM

Posted 27 August 2013 - 01:39 PM

Agreed to what's been said.  I studied and started on the sales side of Best Buy as seasonal, proved my worth and was retained after seasonal.  From there, worked my way up.  You just got to do some study time whether formal or informal to establish your base knowledge and then look for basic stuff from there.  Mom and pop computer repair shops, internships, retail repair.  It is crappy pay and honeslty typically a major headache, but once you get through that first year or so you will provide yourself the base track to begin moving up.  The beauty of the IT industry is the buy in isn't as heavy as Engineering or something like that for example investment wise on your behalf and quickly pays you back with wage increases typically after going through that first 2-3 years of trials and hell.



#7 chromebuster

chromebuster

  • Members
  • 899 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:the crazy city of Boston, In the North East reaches of New England
  • Local time:08:25 PM

Posted 02 September 2013 - 08:23 PM

I suppose then I'll have to try Staples, since I can find no IT-related internships in New England (particularly Massachusetts) at the moment.  And honestly, it seems right at the moment that I'm sort of limited to the internet to find jobs, after all, how else can one find a job these days?  You can't just wander in and be like, "oh yeah, hi.  May I have a job?"  For I can tell you.  I'm not giving up my dream.  I may be blind, though some of the limitations that used to exist for blind people (installation of Windows used to require sighted assistance unless some kind of automation is used, and even then WinPE was a pain in the butt), no longer exist anymore.  yes, server technologies  such as WDS are still hard to work with at the moment, though I told the guy who creates the accessible version of WinPE (yes, unfortunately it's not free since Microsoft will have nothing to do with audio in WinPE), that I will not give him any money until Accessible WinPE is integraded into both MDT and WDS.  And we can identify computer parts by feel; there is even a course for blind people taught by blind people for the CompTIA A+ certification exams.  The only things we can't really do with computers are access vendder's recovery and configuration screens without sighted assistance, and even then, that is just a reader, not somebody doing our job for us, and the UEFI or BIOS interfaces, though I see some cool crap happening in the future with UEFI and audio considering UEFI carries the honor of full OS status.  I just hope I can find my dream and not have to give it up for something else due to time moving too quickly; time's most certainly not on my side at the moment. 


The AccessCop Network is just me and my crew. 

Some call me The Queen of Cambridge


#8 cryptodan

cryptodan

    Bleepin Madman


  • Members
  • 21,868 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Catonsville, Md
  • Local time:12:25 AM

Posted 20 September 2013 - 04:27 PM

If you want any job that deals with the US Government certifications are required per DoD 8570 Memorandum that lists the different levels of service that each certification grants you.

 

I have my CompTIA A+, Network+, and Security+ which would allow me to perform work authorized at the IAT (Information Assurance Technician) Level 2 meaning more hands on and more responsibility.  I also have ITIL v3 Foundation certification which signifies to the hiring people that I know the best practices to follow when handling certain incidents within an organization.

 

I also have a BS in Computer Forensics, and this will go along once the sequestration is over with, and the US Government opens up to hiring and / or companies get more money.

I would definitely and highly encourage everyone to get as many technical certifications as possible.  They do come in handy over average joe's just entering the market.

 

I am planning on going back to school this spring to get my Masters in Cyber Forensics, and then focus on Certified Ethical Hacker Certification along with my CISSP.  Its gonna be a fun journey, but as someone with experience these certifications do matter. 



#9 Sasi Kumar

Sasi Kumar

  • Members
  • 23 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:India
  • Local time:05:55 AM

Posted 07 December 2013 - 03:43 PM

Certifications can be done at any age even at age of 60+ but a 4yr degree and the exposure it gives is a must at right age is my take it will act as a platform for other certifications to grow on it.

 

Also certifications or degree may get you in job but stuff will give you increment and incentives and another great thing to have is experience in the field will add wonders to those scribbles in paper that we learned.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users