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New Processor Woes


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#1 AmericaWestAirlines

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 03:52 PM

Hey there, I recently bought a new AMD Athlon processor off of eBay. First of all, I know that this probably wasn't a good idea. But I don't care. OK. Sooooo I got it in the mail today, I was pretty excited. I installed it, everything went fine. Luckily my motherboard was one with the arm that will slide the chip over. So I installed the new one, everything was just peachy. Put everything back together, plugged the thing back in. Started it up only to find that it started to create some funky kind of smell. It smelled like peanut butter, which isn't pleasant because I'm allergic. The computer also started to make some sort of alarm.

I took out the new one, compared it to the old and found that:
1. The old one had four little foamy feet thingys on each of the corners.
2. The new one didn't.
3. The old one had some sort of greasy bluish substance around the little metal chip in the middle.
4. The new one didn't.

My question is:
Is the new one not working because of those foamy feet thingys?
Do I need to purchase a newer cooling device for it?
Does it also not work because it's lacking the greasy substance? (And if so, can this be applied by a computer place, the foamy feet also?)

Any help would be much appreciated!

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#2 Nick_R_23

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 06:13 PM

The greasy stuff is thermal paste, and it helps transfer heat from the chip to the heatsink. All cpus must have it. Sorry to tell you this, but the cpu is pretty much worthless now, as the smell is the silicon inside the cpu being burnt. This usually happens when the chip is overheated (from lack of thermal paste or heatsink), shorted from static electricity (not wearing an antistatic wristband or grounding yourself), or the chip is crushed (lack of the foam feet or too much pressure from the heatsink). So you are going to need a new cpu, or use your old one.

-Nick

#3 AmericaWestAirlines

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 06:26 PM

Absolutely gone? No way of saving it? The computer hadn't been run more than 10 seconds before I unplugged it.

#4 Nick_R_23

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 07:44 AM

Yes its gone for good. :thumbsup: I had a Duron do the same thing to me a few months ago. I forgot the thermal paste. :flowers: On the bright side they make a nice keychain. If you are going to get another one I would recommend the Athlon XP if your motherboard will support it, they go up to around 2.0 ghz, and the Athlon/Duron series is getting a bit slow although they are not bad cpus.

-Nick

#5 pascor22234

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 03:50 PM

First, get some heatsink compound, preferably Arctic Silver 5. Clean off any old compound from both the top of the CPU and the underside of the heatsink with rubbing alcohol on a soft cloth or a tissue. Just before replacing the heatsink place a SMALL amount of thermal compound on top of and in the center of the CPU die. If you need a tool to reattach the heatsink BE CAREFUL not to slip and gouge the motherboard. This could easily turn it into a doorstop.

Next, check out whether or not the new CPU is fried or not, this time when using heatsink compound.

How do you know your motherboard will support an Athlon XP processor ? Did you do your homework and find out which processors are supported by that particular model of motherboard ?

Check whether your motherboard will support the Sempron processors. They are intended to be a replacement for the now defunct Athlon XP processors. You may have to go the the motherboard manufacturor's web site or call their service department to find out if your particular model of motherboard will support a Sempron. You may also want to find out if DDR333/PC2700 RAM is supported, too. If so, upgrading to PC2700 from, say, PC2100 will give an additional speed boast. (You can use PC3200 DDR in place of PC2700 and it it is more common and cheaper, too. Ignore this if your motherboard uses PC100 or PC133 RAM.)

You may find it difficult to find a reasonably priced Athlon XP processor since they are out of production. Perhaps on EBay. Semprons will probably be cheaper if you can use one.

#6 Herk

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 05:35 PM

First, get some heatsink compound, preferably Arctic Silver 5.


Absolutely. And did you know that Arctic Silver now sells a cleaning kit for heatsinks as well?




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