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Upgrading to SSD - original drive clone possible?


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#1 cbjfan2009

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 05:47 AM

So the title is slightly misleading because I know drive cloning is possible.  I've read this FAQ: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/create-system-image-in-windows-7-8/

 

However, I'm still foggy on the issue of functional drive cloning.

If I buy my wife a new laptop, it will have a mechanical HDD (my price-range).  I'd very much like to, right after purchase, swap that drive with an SSD for speed/performance increase and heat/power-usage decrease.

So, that being said, can I use a cloning software (like Norton Ghost, or whichever you folks have had the best experience with) to copy/ghost the brand-new drive (likely a mostly empty 500GB spinner) onto a 64 or 128GB SSD?  I know the amount of data clones must be less than the total capacity of the new drive.  Are there any other limitations at play here?

 

Thanks a ton!  This site is the best for computer questions; that's why I keep coming back.



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#2 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 06:06 AM

Hi

 

Direct cloning from a hard drive to solid state drive is not recommended due to various reasons. There is a special tool available to do the job properly.

 

http://www.paragon-software.com/technologies/components/migrate-OS-to-SSD/

 

Hope this will help you.



#3 cbjfan2009

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 10:37 AM

Thanks for the information.  I guess my next question would be: if a direct clone HDD to SSD isn't recommended because of the reasons lister in the link, does that mean a windows recovery disk or windows image file cloning method is equally not-recommended?

Ie., considering new computers don't come with rescue disks or OEM OS disks, can you create an installation disk backwards from the OS you already have installed?  I've wondered that in the past when my HDDs crash and I have to get a new physical disk.

Thanks!



#4 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 12:55 PM

Hi

 

As far as i know, most of the OEM recovery disks need the exact same capacity disk for successful restore operation. I usually always replace drives with a same quality one. Since SSD came in considerably smaller capacity than a hard drive, OEM restore disks might not work. 

 

If the Windows image is created after migrating to the SSD, it will definitely work. So i recommend creating a recovery image as soon as the migration is complete. You can do this recovery image to restore the OS in case of a fatal Windows failure.

 

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/663-backup-complete-computer-create-image-backup.html

 

In fact, you can do the migration with the help of free tools. Newer release of disk cloning tools are designed to handle solid state drives. I found a great article with detailed steps which is exactly what you are looking for.

 

http://lifehacker.com/5837543/how-to-migrate-to-a-solid+state-drive-without-reinstalling-windows



#5 cbjfan2009

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 02:55 PM

Anshad Edavana:  Thank you.  I believe this answers my question perfectly.  I wasn't worried about having too little space because my plan was to migrate right after purchasing a new laptop, so no personal files are in jeporady.

One last question:  to clone a disk, must that disk be plugged into the computer at the same time?

Example:  Drive C = HDD, Drive D = SSD

Must C and D be plugged into the laptop simultaneously (ie., both on SATA ports) or do you make the clone/image to an external hard drive, then remove C and hook D in its place?  I've never tried this, obviously.  But if C and D must be attached to the motherboard simultaneously, then would I have to unhook my optical drive temporarily to free up a SATA port for drive D?


Edited by cbjfan2009, 30 July 2013 - 03:02 PM.


#6 DJBPace07

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:13 AM

Both drives must be attached to the computer at the same time for the migration/cloning to work.  You can clone the drive that contains the OS and Windows should be able to configure itself to adapt to the SSD, such as with making sure TRIM is on and it doesn't defragment the drive.  The whole point of cloning is to create a one-to-one copy so the only difference between the drives are the hardware.  Many SSD's contain free software to handle the migration and cloning process.

 

Make sure the data on your old, traditional hard drive isn't larger the capacity of the SSD.  Since this is a new PC, that shouldn't be a concern

 

One other thing, recovery discs often don't contain much information instead opting to access a hidden partition on the hard drive itself.


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#7 videobruce

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 12:08 PM

How about the reverse; from a SSD to a HDD??






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