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What Works For You?


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#1 rigel

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 10:01 PM

Hi BC...

I work in a school district with 750 employees. We constantly see toolbars, screen savers, and weatherbugs dancing around desktops. We have installed filters, use hosts files, packet shapers, and other devices to help out, but somehow users still seem to get into trouble. What have you done with Windows that seems to that makes a difference with you?

rigel

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#2 Albert Frankenstein

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Posted 19 April 2006 - 10:28 PM

You mean besides threatening to cut off the fingers of anyone who downloads ANYTHING?
ALBERT FRANKENSTEIN
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#3 rigel

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 08:40 AM

You mean besides threatening to cut off the fingers of anyone who downloads ANYTHING?


I have a selection of pinkies in my left drawer. :thumbsup:

Just curious about how the rest of the world manages/responds to their Windows users. I do limited HJT work (for my stations) when someone screws things up with malware. If it is really screwed up, we reimage the system - 30 minutes time = a fresh restart for the user. (Of course we back up what we can.)

"In a world where you can be anything, be yourself." ~ unknown

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#4 HitSquad

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 09:05 AM

Downloads are one thing but only admins should have software installation rights, period.

Using Software Restriction Policies to Protect Against Unauthorized Software

#5 Albert Frankenstein

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 09:06 AM

You mention 'employees' so I am guessing that you are referring to the workers at the school and not the students, but let me start with the students anyway!

Deep Freeze is a great program to stop people from making changes to their computer. When you reboot the computer, it is like it is reimaged everytime. Downside - you cannot save data onto the hard drive. Great for public PCs like in a library, Kinkos, school, etc. More info HERE.

That may seem like an extreme approach for the employees workstations. But perhaps they can save their data to a server, and get their emails from a website. That way each day the computers start out fresh. But I like said, maybe that is too harsh, limiting, and unpractical in the real world.

Or, maybe Anti-Executable from the same software company found HERE.

Edited by Albert Frankenstein, 20 April 2006 - 09:24 AM.

ALBERT FRANKENSTEIN
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Currently home chillin' with the fam and my two dogs!


#6 rigel

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Posted 20 April 2006 - 09:12 PM

Deep Freeze is a great program to stop people from making changes to their computer.


I agree! That has brought our lab software issues almost to a halt. Great program. You can do some configuring of Deep Freeze that will allow "Thawed Space" on your hard drive. It gives a student a small space to use for projects. (We recommend they use their flash drives) It also has a maintenance mode that will unlock at off hours to allow virus protection and microsoft updates. Again, an awesome program and has worked for 3 years now without "many" problems. We put a Deep freeze seed on every teacher workstation. If they are habitual offenders, then the get their station locked down.

Downloads are one thing but only admins should have software installation rights, period.

In our case, policy is an employee of the district can be fired if they pirate software. I have seen two people go for this. In spite of that, you would not believe the stuff that shows up on the desktop.

Thanks for the link HitSquad.

"In a world where you can be anything, be yourself." ~ unknown

"Fall in love with someone who deserves your heart. Not someone who plays with it. Will Smith


#7 ThorXP

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 07:39 AM

Hello if you really want to stop some of this stuff from happening it might be possible but it can only be implemented by your IT department.

I think the solution might be to give everybody low-admin accounts. There is an article that might be of some use to this.

Browsing the Web and Reading E-mail Safely as an Administrator

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default....ure11152004.asp

I use this all of the time except when I need Windows Updates then I use the regular IE because you can not download the updates when they can not be written to the hard drive.

#8 Enthusiast

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Posted 21 April 2006 - 02:22 PM

The Microsoft Shared Computer Toolkit for Windows XP provides a simple and effective way to defend shared computers from untrusted users and malicious software, safeguard system resources, and enhance and simplify the user experience. The Toolkit runs on genuine copies of Windows XP Professional, Windows XP Home Edition, and Windows XP Tablet PC Edition.

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details...&displaylang=en

Tools Summary
The Toolkit includes several command-line tools and the following graphical tools:

* Getting Started. Provides access to computer settings and utilities and helps first-time operators learn the Toolkit basics quickly.
* Windows Disk Protection. Protects the Windows partition (typically drive C) that contains the Windows operating system and other programs from being modified without administrator approval. Disk changes made are cleared with each restart unless the administrator chooses to save them.
* User Restrictions. Restricts user access to programs, settings, and Start menu items. The tool also allows you to lock shared local user profiles to prevent permanent changes. (This tool is specifically for use in workgroup environments that do not use Active Directory and Group Policy. A Group Policy template is also included for use in Active Directory environments.)
* Profile Manager. Creates and deletes user profiles. You can use this tool to create user profiles on alternative drives that will retain data and settings even though Windows Disk Protection is on. You can also use the tool to completely delete profiles that have been locked by the User Restrictions tool.
* Accessibility. Makes Windows accessibility options and utilities such as StickyKeys, FilterKeys, and Magnifier available to users who have been restricted from accessing Control Panel and other system settings.

This download includes a comprehensive, 107-page Handbook in PDF format. The Handbook can be browsed online on TechNet.

See if that works for you.




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