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I need a KISS method for protection...


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#1 JustMyAlias

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 10:28 AM

There's too much info, and I clink on one link to another to another...

 

I have Windows XP installed on my computer and use Chrome as my browser.

 

Right now, I am using:

ZoneAlarm (free version) for my firewall, Windows firewall disabled

Ad-Aware Antivirus (free version) actively

SpyBot (free version) actively (and not clear whether this is AV or anti-malware or both, and causing any issues...)

 

then I also have Malware Anti-Malware that I can run on demand.

 

Apparently the Ad-Aware and SpyBot are very outdated choices, so I will uninstall and replace them.

 

If I use ZoneAlarm and Avast actively, then run MalwareBytes periodically (weekly?), will this be enough?

TIA for any guidance.

Keep it simple ; )



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#2 SpywareDoc

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 02:01 PM

Might want to add WinPatrol.



#3 quietman7

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 02:41 PM

No amount of security software is going to defend against today's sophisticated malware writers for those who do not practice safe computing and stay informed. Security begins with personal responsibility and following Best Practices for Safe Computing - Prevention.
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#4 SpywareDoc

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 06:28 PM

Stop 80 percent of malicious attacks now

Guess which two pieces of unpatched software provide points of entry for most security breaches. (Hint: They're not Windows)
...

 

 



#5 quietman7

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 06:33 PM

Stop 80 percent of malicious attacks now
 

Guess which two pieces of unpatched software provide points of entry for most security breaches. (Hint: They're not Windows)
...

Kaspersky Lab report: Evaluating the threat level of software vulnerabilities
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#6 SpywareDoc

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 06:38 PM

Yep. "The most vulnerable products are Adobe Shockwave/Flash Player, Apple iTunes/QuickTime and Oracle Java."



#7 JustMyAlias

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 11:14 AM

Okay - thank you for the info.

I will read through it.



#8 quietman7

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 11:30 AM

You're welcome on behalf of the Bleeping Computer community.
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#9 P3nnyw1se

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 08:15 AM

But what do you need all that for?
are you browsing a lot of sketchy sites? clicking on weird links?

downloading unknown exe files?

I have security essentials and Defender.. and in my opinion if you know just a bit about computers

you don't need more than that.. sure you sometimes run into the occational malware that disables stuff or breaks it

and then you boot in safemode, install malware antibytes.. and you go on with your happy life



#10 quietman7

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 08:42 AM

...boot in safemode, install malware antibytes.. and you go on with your happy life


Scanning with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware in safe or normal mode will work but removal functions are not as powerful in safe mode. Why? MBAM is designed to be at full power when malware is running so safe mode is not necessary when using it. In fact, MBAM loses some effectiveness for detection and removal when used in safe mode because the program includes a special driver which does not work in safe mode. Further, scanning in safe mode prevents some types of malware from running so it may be missed during the detection process. Additionally, there are various types of malware infections which target the safeboot keyset so booting into safe mode is not always possible. For optimal removal, normal mode is recommended so it does not limit the abilities of MBAM. Doing a safe mode scan should only be done when a regular mode scan fails or you cannot boot up normally. If that is the case, after completing a safe mode scan, reboot normally, update the database definitions through the program's interface (preferable method) and try rescanning again.
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#11 P3nnyw1se

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 03:04 PM

 

...boot in safemode, install malware antibytes.. and you go on with your happy life


Scanning with Malwarebytes Anti-Malware in safe or normal mode will work but removal functions are not as powerful in safe mode. Why? MBAM is designed to be at full power when malware is running so safe mode is not necessary when using it. In fact, MBAM loses some effectiveness for detection and removal when used in safe mode because the program includes a special driver which does not work in safe mode. Further, scanning in safe mode prevents some types of malware from running so it may be missed during the detection process. Additionally, there are various types of malware infections which target the safeboot keyset so booting into safe mode is not always possible. For optimal removal, normal mode is recommended so it does not limit the abilities of MBAM. Doing a safe mode scan should only be done when a regular mode scan fails or you cannot boot up normally. If that is the case, after completing a safe mode scan, reboot normally, update the database definitions through the program's interface (preferable method) and try rescanning again.

 

then reason I usually do it in safe mode, is simply because over the years I have experienced malware/spyware..
that made sure I couldn't run malware bytes in normal, or simply wasn't removed..
Eitherway I still stick by what I wrote, having all those different programs installed, will only slow down the computer or simply conflict on several occations
and unless you constantly attempt unknown exe files.. it seems like a big overkill to me 

 

especially considering he is running a windows XP machine, I'm hereby assuming its not exactly state of the art.



#12 quietman7

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 05:49 PM

Why use safe mode? The Windows operating system protects files when they are being accessed by an application or a program. Malware writers create programs that can insert itself and hide in these protected areas when the files are being used. Using safe mode reduces the number of modules requesting files to only essentials which make your computer functional. This in turn reduces the number of hiding places for malware, making it easier to find and delete the offending files when performing scans with anti-virus and anti-malware tools. In many cases, performing your scans in safe mode speeds up the scanning process. Scanning in safe mode was a recommended course of action years ago before malware writers began to employ more sophisticated techniques to counter removal efforts in that mode.

Why not use safe mode? Some security tools like anti-rootkit scanners (ARKs) and programs with anti-rootkit technology use special drivers which are required for the scanning and removal process. These tools are designed to work in normal mode because the drivers will not load in safe mode which lessens the scan's effectiveness. Other security tools are optimized to run from normal mode where they are most effective. Malwarebytes is only one example...there a more.

Scanning in safe mode prevents some types of malware from running so it may be missed during the detection process. If the malware is not related to a running process (i.e. malicious .dll) it probably will not make a difference performing a scan in normal or safe mode. A hidden piece of malware such as a rootkit which protects other malicious files and registry keys from deletion may not be detected in either mode without the use of special tools. Additionaly, if the scanner you're using does not include definitions for the malware, then they may not detect or remove it regardless of what mode is used. Also keep in mind that there are various types of malware infections which target the safeboot keyset so booting into safe mode is not always possible.
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#13 JustMyAlias

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 10:48 AM

(He is a she.)  And my laptop was originally about $1200, and I have since added a new hard drive.  So maybe not new or state of the art, but not ready to just toss it out and start over if I have an issue.  I'm just old school and haven't upgraded my OS (having started on DOS, I am very resistant to change...)  Although I just installed Windows 8 on my daughter's pc, and I do like it...

I don't surf on any sketch sites, but I do spend a lot of time on Facebook (and no, not games), occasionally YouTube and iTunes, and I also do a lot of shopping online.

And no, I am not opening e-mails with attachments or links.

But inevitably, I always end up with something on my pc.

 

I'd rather do minimal work up front, then deal with a major headache later...

 



#14 quietman7

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 01:23 PM

Keep in mind that even legitimate websites can be a source of malware infection.Researchers at the Global Security Advisor Research Blog have reported finding pornographic virus variants on Facebook. The Koobface Worm has been found to attack both Facebook and MySpace users. Virus Bulletin has reported MySpace attacked by worm, adware and phishing. Some MySpace user pages have been found carrying the dangerous Virut. Malware has been discovered on YouTube and it continues to have a problem with malware ads.
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