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Microsoft Security Essentials how effective is it?


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#1 Darktune

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 09:02 AM

Hey guys,

 

I use MSE as my only real time anti-virus protection software. It has never found anything on my PC. Which is good, or bad. I'm assuming good because I also run MBAM ( only as a scanner not real time protection ) and that never find anything either. Plus my PC has been checked by one of the forum members and is clean.

 

So how good is MSE? I know a lot of people recommend it, and a lot of people say it isn't that good.

 

Thank you

 

Craig


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#2 jkostar

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 09:14 AM

MSE was a very good AV application, but has gone downhill recently. I work with a large number of AV apps,and have found the MSE has lost a step or two in there detection algorithm for the newer types of infections out there. Obviously no AV can be perfect, and I really don't have any specific issues with MSE, so having MBAM is not a bad idea at all. If you have not noticed any issues on your pc, and neither of these applications have found nothing, ( assuming they both have current definitions and at least one full scan has been run with each) I would not be too concerned with any infections on the pc. If you are looking for a replacement, there are tons out there, I would suggest to try out a few, and see what you like and what fits you best. ( snapfiles.com has a large variety of free downloads available, as does this site.) If you are realy looking for top of the line protection, a paid Av app may be the way to go.


 

 

 


#3 quietman7

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 09:39 AM

Darktune, many folks ask the same question so you will always get a variety of opinions.

There are several comparative labs which test anti-virus products but these kinds of comparative testing results will vary depending on a variety of factors to include but not limited to who conducted the testing, what they were testing for (type of threats, attack vectors, exploits), what versions of anti-virus software was tested, what type of scanning engine was used, and the ability to clean or repair. There are no universally predefined set of standards or criteria for testing which means each test will yield different results. As such, you need to look for detailed information about how the tests were conducted, the procedures used, and data results. Read Anti-virus Testing Websites: An overview of testing sites

You also may want to read Choosing an Anti-Virus Program.
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#4 Darktune

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 10:19 AM

Thank you both,

 

I know that there is not one universally great AV. I just wanted opinions.

 

I shall read the links you provided quietman7 thank you.

 

 

Craig


It's very hard to imagine all the crazy things that things really are like. 

Electrons act like waves.. no they don't exactly, they act like particles.. no they don't exactly.

Words and ideas can change the world.


#5 quietman7

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 10:21 AM

You're welcome.
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#6 w411

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 02:14 PM

I have used MSE since 2009 on all of my own systems and all of my small business customers and have never had any significant issues.  Of course AV is only a part of the puzzle, the main piece being end user education.  One issue I have noticed over the years, if malware finds it's way onto your system, MSE will identify it but sometimes has trouble removing the malware. MBAM is pretty reliable at pulling those so definitely a good combination between the two.

 

I find many customers really don't pay attention to the definitions subscriptions in the fee based AV software, and to this day still find things like Norton Antivirus 2002 installed on Windows 7 machines because they found the disk from an old computer and figured they were good to go!



#7 noknojon

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 07:06 PM

As per quietman7, the choice of an Antivirus varies on the user, but please note that MSE seems more of an Antivirus rather than specific Antimalware. It must also have Updates set to install prior to any scan, and yes it has prevented / stopped infections on my system.

I also use M.S.E. but I find that another Antimalware specific program is needed to chase general infections that are not Virus related.

 

Malwarebytes (as mentioned above) along with SUPERAntiSpyware Free (aka SAS) suits my system.

 

But I will add that Every system / person will never be suited only the one program.

 

Thank You -



#8 victor7

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 07:30 PM

I've used MSE with 4 computers since about 2010.  I use it regularly, along with MBAM.  I also use a different program, such as AVAST or the SUPERAntiSpyware Free periodically, maybe once a month.  I've found that AVAST has identified a few trojans that MSE missed.  But that was after I knew I had a viral problem somewhere.  No bad problems.  All the above do locate problems/potential problems for me, and my systems continue to work.



#9 slgrieb

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 11:14 PM

I don't find MSE effective. It's about on a par with the current Norton offerings. And that basically means it rates as more decorative than useful. Sorry, I just do too many malware removals where MSE hasn't blocked the infection and can't detect it with a full scan when other tools will remove the infection. A few weeks ago, I had a Win7 computer in house, and at boot, MSE would report that the system was infected with a Zeus variant, and instructed me to create a MSE Offline bootable CD/Pendrive and use it to remove the infection. Of course, the bootable disk found exactly zero infections in 3 tries, even though MSE kept giving me the same old line whenever I booted to Windows. That's unacceptable performance. I cleaned the drive with other tools, so this wasn't a false positive, and I can't imagine trusting the product.


Edited by slgrieb, 17 July 2013 - 11:15 PM.

Yes, Mr. Death... I'll play you a game! But not CHESS !!! BAH... FOOEY! My game is... 
WIFFLEBALL!

 


#10 quietman7

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 09:31 AM

No single product is 100% foolproof and can prevent, detect and remove all threats at any given time. Just because one anti-virus or anti-malware scanner detected threats that another missed, does not mean its more effective. The security community is in a constant state of change as new infections appear and it takes time for them to be reported, samples collected, analyzed, and tested by anti-vendors. Security vendors use different scanning engines and different detection methods such as Heuristic Analysis, Behavioral Analysis, Sandboxing and Signature files (containing the binary patterns of known virus signatures) which can account for discrepancies in scanning outcomes. Depending on how often the anti-virus or anti-malware database is updated can also account for differences in threat detections.No amount of security software is going to defend against today's sophisticated malware writers for those who do not practice safe computing and stay informed.
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#11 slgrieb

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 11:33 PM

No argument, but if MSE Offline can't detect and remove a Zeus infection while TDSSKiller can, I'm not going to suggest MSE as a reliable product. Sure, no AV/AM software is perfect, but I think if you spend enough time with tests and real world experience, it's pretty clear there are some top shelf products, and the rest of the pack.

 

The real challenge for users today is that many of the old paradigms about "safe browsing habits" don't apply much. A lot of malware is delivered via compromised, legitimate sites, and by online ads. I recently checked the Eset Remote Administrator log for one of my credit unions, and found that every time an employee accessed our local paper's obituary section to check the lists of deaths against their  membership records, NOD32 blocked malware, and it wasn't hard to trace the source to an ad on the Obituary Page.

 

So, while it's still good advice to avoid all the "free" online porn, games, coupons, movies, TV, etc. that isn't sufficient anymore, and the effectiveness of our AV/AM software is more important than ever.


Edited by slgrieb, 18 July 2013 - 11:34 PM.

Yes, Mr. Death... I'll play you a game! But not CHESS !!! BAH... FOOEY! My game is... 
WIFFLEBALL!

 


#12 noknojon

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 04:56 AM

but if MSE Offline can't detect and remove a Zeus infection while TDSSKiller can

TDSSKiller can not be compared in any way to M.S.E. as they are unrelated types of programs
Kaspersky Lab has developed the TDSSKiller utility that allows removing rootkits, not "general virus"
Some rootkits install its own drivers and services in the system (they also remain “invisible”).

 

TDSSKiller is not a replacement for any general Antivirus (Kaspersky also have an Antivirus)

A rootkit is a malware program that is designed to hide itself or other computer infections on your computer. These types of programs are typically harder to remove than generic malware, which is the reason that stand-alone utilities such as TDSSKiller have been developed.

 

AVG needed to design a specific one hit tool (related to TDSSKiller) just for Zeus infection called "rmzbot.exe"



#13 w411

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 04:12 PM

No argument, but if MSE Offline can't detect and remove a Zeus infection while TDSSKiller can, I'm not going to suggest MSE as a reliable product. Sure, no AV/AM software is perfect, but I think if you spend enough time with tests and real world experience, it's pretty clear there are some top shelf products, and the rest of the pack.

 

The real challenge for users today is that many of the old paradigms about "safe browsing habits" don't apply much. A lot of malware is delivered via compromised, legitimate sites, and by online ads. I recently checked the Eset Remote Administrator log for one of my credit unions, and found that every time an employee accessed our local paper's obituary section to check the lists of deaths against their  membership records, NOD32 blocked malware, and it wasn't hard to trace the source to an ad on the Obituary Page.

 

So, while it's still good advice to avoid all the "free" online porn, games, coupons, movies, TV, etc. that isn't sufficient anymore, and the effectiveness of our AV/AM software is more important than ever.

 

So in your testing real world experience, what are the clear top shelf products?  Keeping in mind also that the original poster is looking for option related to single pc solutions and not an enterprise solution.



#14 noknojon

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 05:27 AM

In answer to w411 -

I love MSE and always use it (and it has caught infections for me) -

 

This may not be the Ultimate in Antivirus, but I do not wish to purchase (better) Kaspersky or ESET prograns -

 

My simple opinion only -



#15 g.k.

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 01:39 PM

I find many customers really don't pay attention to the definitions subscriptions in the fee based AV software, and to this day still find things like Norton Antivirus 2002 installed on Windows 7 machines because they found the disk from an old computer and figured they were good to go!

 

Quick question - did any of those computers run IE6? :lol:






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