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Standby - Hibernate


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#1 yabbadoo

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 07:03 AM

I  use Standby for "working hours" and Hibernate for nightly shutdown.

 

Changing from Standby to Hibernate is immediate. Changing from Hibernate to Standby takes ages.

 

Does anybody know why this enormous response difference is present ?



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#2 Sirawit

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 08:02 AM

If I correctly understand.

 

Sleep = Keep everything in memory but use almost none of power.

 

Hibernate = Half-Shutdown the computer.

 

So sleep ---> Hibernate is just wake it up then act like shutdown.

 

But Hibernate ---> Sleep is like Boot it up again and make it sleep.

 

Then start system from Hibernate takes more time than from sleep.

 

Don't blame if I wrong!

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#3 TsVk!

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 04:58 PM

From what I understand of hibernation function... hyberfil.sys is integrated and a backup of computers status that updates constantly whilst running in hibernation mode. So when your machine switches to hibernation mode it has to update completely before it starts functioning correctly and your system resumes normal operation. Switching to standby it just turns off so no wait. But when you turn it back on again it has to update, again.

 

Edit: but then reading your post I realize you are having to wait the other way, maybe you are having an issue. Maybe I have it back to front and the de-integration of hyberfil.sys takes longer than starting the service that updates this file. Either way it has something to do with that I'm pretty sure.

 

Edit edit: or maybe it floods the RAM as the processes are not shutting down in the correct order. I wish I'd just kept my mouth shut now... lol

 

Edit edit edit: so I googled this thing because it had me spinning, everyone else reports it the other way as I would have thought.


Edited by TsVk!, 17 July 2013 - 05:20 PM.


#4 yabbadoo

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Posted 18 July 2013 - 12:02 AM


From what I understand of hibernation function... hyberfil.sys is integrated and a backup of computers status that updates constantly whilst running in hibernation mode. So when your machine switches to hibernation mode it has to update completely before it starts functioning correctly and your system resumes normal operation. Switching to standby it just turns off so no wait. But when you turn it back on again it has to update, again.

=============== ABOVE SEEMS TO  EXPLAIN MY QUESTION

 

Edit: but then reading your post I realize you are having to wait the other way, maybe you are having an issue. Maybe I have it back to front and the de-integration of hyberfil.sys takes longer than starting the service that updates this file. Either way it has something to do with that I'm pretty sure.

======== NO, it is ME who is back to front

My  statement :-

"Changing from Standby to Hibernate is immediate. Changing from Hibernate to Standby takes ages."

 

​I am for ever ashamed for making this dumb mistake in my description. It is like you so rightly point out THE OTHER WAY  ROUND and should have read :-

"Changing from Hibernate to Standby is immediate. Changing from Standby to Hibernate takes ages."

 

Your first paragraph explains why I get 30-40 seconds delay when changing from Standby to Hibernate before I can  click Apply>OK.

 

I am so grateful for your explanation of the delay and even more so for pointing out that I was a perfect idiot in putting my shoes on the wrong feet. Guess I'll have to mark my shoes with a big "L" and "R".  I am deeply sorry for causing you so much unnecessary trouble, when you had the answer in the  first place.

 

Must be a sign of age. I apologise to all the readers and posters for this unintentional mistake.

Yabba

​PS - The thread can be considered fully answered and closed.

 

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         CHEERS !


Edited by yabbadoo, 18 July 2013 - 12:48 AM.


#5 quietman7

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 01:18 PM

Suspend, Standby, and Sleep all mean much of the same thing. When your computer is in one of these power-saving modes, it remembers everything you are doing and quickly resume full-power when you want to use the computer again. Essentiall, the monitor turns off, so the computer uses less energy but it keeps enough to remember what your were doing. Hibernation is similar but uses the computers hard disk to store everything that was in memory so the computer can turn off completely. Standby requires that there be power to the computer because it uses RAM. Hibernate copies the RAM to the hard drive and then shuts the system off. Standby is faster to start than Hibernation but Hibernation will survive power surges which Standby won't.
 

Sleep is a power-saving state that allows a computer to quickly resume full-power operation (typically within several seconds) when you want to start working again. Putting your computer into the sleep state is like pausing a DVD playerthe computer immediately stops what its doing and is ready to start again when you want to resume working.

Hibernate is a power-saving state designed primarily for laptops. While sleep puts your work and settings in memory and draws a small amount of power, hibernation puts your open documents and programs on your hard disk, and then turns off your computer. Of all the power-saving states in Windows, hibernation uses the least amount of power. On a laptop, use hibernation when you know that you won't use your laptop for an extended period and won't have an opportunity to charge the battery during that time.

Hybrid sleep is designed primarily for desktop computers. Hybrid sleep is a combination of sleep and hibernateit puts any open documents and programs in memory and on your hard disk, and then puts your computer into a low-power state so that you can quickly resume your work. That way, if a power failure occurs, Windows can restore your work from your hard disk. When hybrid sleep is turned on, putting your computer into sleep automatically puts your computer into hybrid sleep. Hybrid sleep is typically turned on by default on desktop computers.

Sleep and hibernation FAQs: Windows 7


Hibernate saves an image of your desktop with all open files and documents, and then it powers down your computer. When you turn on power, your files and documents are open on your desktop exactly as you left them.

Standby reduces the power consumption of your computer by cutting power to hardware components you are not using. Standby can cut power to peripheral devices, your monitor, even your hard drive, but maintains power to your computer's memory so you don't lose your work...

Hibernate and Standby

Sleep and hibernation FAQs
Windows 7: Manage Power Settings
Power Options overview in Windows XP
Understanding Differences Between Hibernate and Stand By in XP
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