Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

How To Boot Linux Puppy?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 ScreamingBanshee

ScreamingBanshee

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:11:10 PM

Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:53 PM

I thought I'd have a go at Puppy because they say it is lightweight.  I just want to use it for the internet.

 

I formatted my USB pendrive, as shown in the video and downloaded it to my USB stick.

 

I pressed Del. to get into set up and changed my boot device to USB FDD but the computer boots into WIndows each time, regardless.

 

I'm obviously missing something here... Can anyone please advise?


Edited by ScreamingBanshee, 15 July 2013 - 07:32 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 stiltskin

stiltskin

  • Members
  • 238 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western MO
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 15 July 2013 - 07:39 PM

You didn't say what instructions you followed. And it sounds like you simply copied the .iso to a thumb drive. Which won't work.

 

If you want to install it to a thumb drive, try this method.

 

But if that isn't what you want, if you want to run it from the thumb drive so you can install it to a hard drive, get unetbootin. There's a version for linux, Winders and Mac. Run that and select Puppy from the tlist. Then chose the drive from the drop-down list at bottom and away you go. It will download Puppy and write to the drive. If you'd rather use a file you already downloaded, just choose the Disk Image dialog and it will let you locate the file it's going to write.



#3 ScreamingBanshee

ScreamingBanshee
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:11:10 PM

Posted 15 July 2013 - 07:54 PM

Well, there does not appear to be a .ISO file amongst those on there.

I used the unetbootin method and followed the instructions from there.

 

Yes, the idea was to boot directly from the pendrive.

 

It might help if I could show you a screenshot of the content on my device...

 

How do I upload a picture to my reply?


Edited by ScreamingBanshee, 15 July 2013 - 08:03 PM.


#4 ScreamingBanshee

ScreamingBanshee
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:11:10 PM

Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:06 PM

You didn't say what instructions you followed.

 

 

Oops, sorry!  Here's a link to the instructions I was following...



#5 stiltskin

stiltskin

  • Members
  • 238 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western MO
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 16 July 2013 - 04:40 AM

OK, in your original post you said you set the BIOS to boot to USB FDD. On some systems, that may not work. What other options do you have?

 

I work on mobile video systems at work. For some thumb drive work (namely SystemRescueCD) I have to set the boot device as USB ZIP. For some things (Ghost for instance) it doesn't make any difference as long as the first device is something USB. I have to set it to USB FDD in order to update the BIOS even though that's also on a thumb drive. Any deviation for some of the drives and that drive won't boot from the thumb drive.

 

You can also try changing device selection by using a function key. Unfortunately, this can vary by machine. Some use F8, some F12, and at least one uses F10. This method lets you select the boot device just for one session. You start hitting the key when you for see POST (power-on self-test) and keep hitting it until the boot selection menu comes up. Then you choose the device itself. Unfortunately, unless you know the proper key you might have to experiment. But you can probably find out from the manufacturer's web site. Or it might even name the key when POST starts (some do, some don't).



#6 ScreamingBanshee

ScreamingBanshee
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:11:10 PM

Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:22 AM

Hi Stiltskin.

 

Device selection is F8 for me.  If I'm wrong, it doesn't matter, since the options are llisted at the bottom of the POST screen.  Again, I chose USB FDD.  So obviously that doesn't work. 

 

I'm currently using my laptop.  When I get back in front of the desktop, I'll see if there's an option for ZIP, try it and get back to you.

 

Thanks for your help.



#7 stiltskin

stiltskin

  • Members
  • 238 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western MO
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 16 July 2013 - 06:49 AM

It could also be that something went wrong when it wrote the bootloader. I've had that fail with unetbootin before even though I was installing from the list.

 

Another thing is the thumb drive. I've had endless problems with Sandisk Cruzers, even though I can sometimes get it to work. I don't know if they're all the same, but the ones I have contain software for Windows. There's drive emulation builtin so that the system sees it as a CD drive. It's not bootable, so the boostrapping will look at it, see it won't boot, then move on to the next drive in the list. There's a utility for turning that off so that CD emulation isn't there any more and it boots just fine. (Good thing I already have it downloaded because I couldn't find it the last time I looked for it.) There's also one for turning that function back on.

 

Sandisk has been my biggest headache, but I've had troubles off and on with other thumb drives. In most cases it came down to the bootloader being munged, either at the time of writing or later on when it just seemed to go TU.



#8 ScreamingBanshee

ScreamingBanshee
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:11:10 PM

Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:19 PM

Turns out FDD was correct.  I simply neglected to set the boot disk priority in CMOS.

 

I've got as far as the Puppy boot loader now.     I'm now able to call up boot options for Puppy (F2).

 

Using both default (auto in 8 secs) and the 'Load totally into RAM' options, it goes through some loading steps but hangs on the last(?) one.  Trying to remember the exact description... (something to do with the disk drive).


Edited by ScreamingBanshee, 16 July 2013 - 10:58 PM.


#9 stiltskin

stiltskin

  • Members
  • 238 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Western MO
  • Local time:05:10 PM

Posted 17 July 2013 - 04:57 AM

You may have to let it run for a long time. Sometimes they get weirded out on some drive detection. Don't know why, and it can be for more than one reason (if memory serves), such as a slow controller, a drive that's slightly different (could be odd partition, going bad, weird geometry, and some drives just don't like to cooperate sometimes (hello, Seagate)), an empty drive (usually a floppy or CD reader, even though that still shouldn't happen), another external device, and so on.

 

Also, just because it looks like it's stopping at a point, you can't always assume that's really where it's stopping. For instance, I had one boot that appeared to have already detecetd all of the drives. Or maybe not. It wasn't clear if it was stuck at the end of drive detection or on the next step. Yet it would hang forever. It turned out I had a phone (not a smart phone) plugged in for charging. It got to that device and stopped. Once unplugged it booted up quickly. The phone wasn't sharing as a USB drive, but it was connecting itself as a media device. The particular distro didn't like that for some reason. But not a word was offered as to why everything halted. I had to find it through experimentation.

 

I've had similar oddiities for other hardware. Including internal drives not being cooperative. I've had RAM problems that linux didn't like. Once I had a bad stick that appeare dto be OK in Windows, but would kernel panic during boot on linux. I thought that particular linux install had aproblem. Tt turned out Windows would finally lock up solid after I used it long enough, too. Linux just detected the problem earlier and refused to move until everythng was fixed.



#10 ScreamingBanshee

ScreamingBanshee
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 25 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Local time:11:10 PM

Posted 22 July 2013 - 10:23 PM

Hmmm... sounds like a case for getting a Mac... :)

 

Thanks for sharing that.  Excuse my long time in replying, I haven't been online much lately.

 

Taking into account all you've described, I really wouldn't know where to start troubleshooting.  :inlove:






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users