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HD clicking sound and won't load windows


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#1 ImmaNoob

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 09:21 PM

Since yesterday my HD won't load windows. I'm able to get into my BIOS, but not sure what I need to do in there or what to look for. HD makes a clicking noise when CPU is turned on. I recorded it and here is a link to it:

 

 

When powering on it asks to press the tab key after that I'm in CMD and it read load from boot device and press any key.



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#2 slgrieb

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 10:13 PM

Unfortunately, this is The Click of Death. The short explanation is that your drive has experienced an unrecoverable failure. So, you're going to need a replacement drive. In some cases, it's possible to recover data from the old drive by freezing it and then doing a data transfer, but you need some preparation for this. First of all you need a working computer and a drive with sufficient capacity for the transfer, and it has to available for immediate use after you pull the drive out of the freezer. Of course, if you practice good backup procedures, you can skip the whole freezing thing. But, just in case, here's how it works. Pop the old drive into a Ziploc bag, place in the freezer for several hours, then immediately connect to the computer you want to use for the transfer, and copy your data. You'll find some who say this doesn't work with The Click of Death, but sometimes it does . Normally, this is a one shot attempt. So, restoring a backup to the new drive is certainly the best approach, but if you need the data of the dead drive and don't have it backed up, you really have nothing to lose.


Yes, Mr. Death... I'll play you a game! But not CHESS !!! BAH... FOOEY! My game is... 
WIFFLEBALL!

 


#3 ImmaNoob

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 06:54 AM

No offense, and that may work, I think I wait for someone in this Forum with seniority to give me step by step instructions like they do in other parts of the Forum.



#4 Platypus

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 07:07 AM

Unfortunately, what slgrieb has said is correct. The sound your drive is making is a terminal condition, a failure mode commonly known as the click of death. Even rather costly professional laboratory services have no certainty of being able to do anything with a drive that has suffered this fate. The "freezer trick" has been known to temporarily restore operation sometimes, depending on the cause of the failure. The only time I tried it (on a drive that had been condemned by professional recovery labs) there was no positive result.


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#5 ImmaNoob

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 08:00 AM

The clicking had been going on for quite some time then disappeared after I removed some Malware, I think my son could have compromised my BIOS. I deleted his account and mine was password protected, so I think he tried to bypass it through the BIOS



#6 Platypus

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 08:50 AM

If you're comfortable working with the drive connectors in the system, one thing you could do to further confirm the drive's status, is to disconnect the SATA cable leaving only the larger power connector still attached to the drive, then power up the computer. The drive is then operating independent of the rest of the computer system, and if it does the click of death, that confirms the drive has an internal fault. If you operate the computer this way, you can disregard any screen messages about not finding an Operating System, and simply turn the computer off when finished. However if there were any bootable devices or a bootable disc in CD/DVD drive, not having the hard drive connected could cause the system to boot from these, so disconnect external devices & have optical drive empty.


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#7 ImmaNoob

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 09:12 AM

can you tell from the video which is the SATA cable?



#8 dpunisher

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 11:06 AM

2 connectors on the drive.  SATA connector is the  smaller of the two.


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#9 slgrieb

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 03:12 PM

No offense, and that may work, I think I wait for someone in this Forum with seniority to give me step by step instructions like they do in other parts of the Forum.

No offense taken at all, though I really hate being a newbie. For what it's worth, I've been in business for something like 14 years. I've considerable experience in online support, and I'm generally reliable as long as my medication is properly adjusted  :devil:


Yes, Mr. Death... I'll play you a game! But not CHESS !!! BAH... FOOEY! My game is... 
WIFFLEBALL!

 


#10 slgrieb

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 03:54 PM

The clicking had been going on for quite some time then disappeared after I removed some Malware, I think my son could have compromised my BIOS. I deleted his account and mine was password protected, so I think he tried to bypass it through the BIOS

I'm sorry, but as a noob myself, I'm wondering how you deleted the malware on your system if it wouldn't boot into Windows. The tools you used to do this are certainly worth sharing. Actually, I don't believe either BIOS issues or malware would cause the issue you describe, but I'm always open to new learning experiences.


Edited by slgrieb, 13 July 2013 - 03:58 PM.

Yes, Mr. Death... I'll play you a game! But not CHESS !!! BAH... FOOEY! My game is... 
WIFFLEBALL!

 


#11 ImmaNoob

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 10:45 PM

 

The clicking had been going on for quite some time then disappeared after I removed some Malware, I think my son could have compromised my BIOS. I deleted his account and mine was password protected, so I think he tried to bypass it through the BIOS

I'm sorry, but as a noob myself, I'm wondering how you deleted the malware on your system if it wouldn't boot into Windows. The tools you used to do this are certainly worth sharing. Actually, I don't believe either BIOS issues or malware would cause the issue you describe, but I'm always open to new learning experiences.

 

Recently when the clicking first started I posted in Malware and Gringo helped me get rid of a few things. That it got infected was my mistake for not switching profiles and my son had access. The clicking had stopped after Gringo was done and then I forgot again to switch and my son was in it again as through his profile I clocked most sites.

 

So I completely deleted his profile and mine would automatically lock. When I got home the computer was off and my son was sitting on the roof thinking irrational. So I figured he tried to crack my password by doing something in the BIOS, I could be wrong, but I think that has something to do with it. So I would like to go over the BIOS settings first before I try anything else.

 

I can access the BIOS.



#12 slgrieb

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 11:26 PM

 

 

The clicking had been going on for quite some time then disappeared after I removed some Malware, I think my son could have compromised my BIOS. I deleted his account and mine was password protected, so I think he tried to bypass it through the BIOS

I'm sorry, but as a noob myself, I'm wondering how you deleted the malware on your system if it wouldn't boot into Windows. The tools you used to do this are certainly worth sharing. Actually, I don't believe either BIOS issues or malware would cause the issue you describe, but I'm always open to new learning experiences.

 

Recently when the clicking first started I posted in Malware and Gringo helped me get rid of a few things. That it got infected was my mistake for not switching profiles and my son had access. The clicking had stopped after Gringo was done and then I forgot again to switch and my son was in it again as through his profile I clocked most sites.

 

So I completely deleted his profile and mine would automatically lock. When I got home the computer was off and my son was sitting on the roof thinking irrational. So I figured he tried to crack my password by doing something in the BIOS, I could be wrong, but I think that has something to do with it. So I would like to go over the BIOS settings first before I try anything else.

 

I can access the BIOS.

 

Fascinating story, but I don't buy it. Bad hardware is bad hardware. I noticed on another thread that you are getting a replacement desktop, and in the meantime, you are using a laptop that you may return. Really? Doggone, I guess in the future you'll definitely need to rely on more senior members for help since I think we may have an ethical disagreement here.


Edited by slgrieb, 13 July 2013 - 11:29 PM.

Yes, Mr. Death... I'll play you a game! But not CHESS !!! BAH... FOOEY! My game is... 
WIFFLEBALL!

 


#13 ImmaNoob

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Posted 13 July 2013 - 11:40 PM

well, this laptop was the one I was able to afford at this time, not the one I truly want. So, if in two weeks I get the one I want in exchange for this one, I don't see anything wrong with it and within two weeks a lot of things can happen and I might start to like this one or I might give it to my son, but I make sure that next time I post in a more details so there won't be any confusion.

 

Oh, btw my BIOS found my HD, so I guess I just got lucky, hopefully long enough to get my files transferred.

 

And I do appreciate the suggestions and the help you tried to provide, and I'm sorry for the misunderstanding.  



#14 slgrieb

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 12:00 AM

well, this laptop was the one I was able to afford at this time, not the one I truly want. So, if in two weeks I get the one I want in exchange for this one, I don't see anything wrong with it and within two weeks a lot of things can happen and I might start to like this one or I might give it to my son, but I make sure that next time I post in a more details so there won't be any confusion.

 

Oh, btw my BIOS found my HD, so I guess I just got lucky, hopefully long enough to get my files transferred.

 

And I do appreciate the suggestions and the help you tried to provide, and I'm sorry for the misunderstanding.  

I don't think we have a misunderstanding.


Yes, Mr. Death... I'll play you a game! But not CHESS !!! BAH... FOOEY! My game is... 
WIFFLEBALL!

 


#15 Platypus

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 06:11 AM

My guess would be that the drive is suffering what is called a logical failure. This involves the drive's operating firmware which is held on the non-user area of the drive platter, and is loaded each time the drive initializes. This type of failure typically produces the "click of death" as the drive must continue to try to initialize, and was the failure mechanism of the infamous Deskstar drives that popularized the concept. If the platter surface has degraded in this location, it could have a very high error rate, which the drive can occasionally eventually overcome, or the particles of degraded material occlude the tracks the drive is trying to read, until they get relocated by air movement in the drive. This means a drive can have periods of partial operation until the condition becomes terminal. Definitely take quick measures to transfer any files you need while the drive still functions.


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