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Damaged hardware?


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#1 J Moldy

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 11:45 PM

Operating system Windows 7

 

Was playing on the computer, leaned over and knocked a heavy cooking griddle off a nearby table, caused it to fall on the computer case. This knocked out the network. Wondering if it had knocked the card loose, I tilted the computer forward to look at the back, checked that everything looked okay, and tightened the antennae on the network card. Lowered the computer back down, found the computer had frozen entirely.

 

Attempted a restart, boot up froze on the windows flag Loading screen. Attempted several system startup repairs, occasionally finding something wrong (can't see WHAT's wrong), sometimes saying nothing's wrong. Attempting a system checkpoint did not help. Am running memory diagnostic.

 

Anyone have any ideas on what the problem is, how to fix it?



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#2 AngryRaisin

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 12:38 AM

When a computer takes a hard blow all kinds of things can go wrong - the easy things to solve are to unplug the computer open up the case and reseat items that can come loose (Ram sticks, expandable cards, data and power connectors). Also visually check for dents and cracks that tell you that something bad happened.

But usually the if the hard drive takes hard impact/vibration while in use - it is usually the first piece to go bad and cause problems... If you are lucky a chkdsk /r from an administrative command prompt and a restart will solve the problem - if you are not so lucky you replace the hard drive and reinstall windows, among other things.

#3 J Moldy

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 02:13 AM

How do I run a chkdsk when I can't start it up?



#4 AngryRaisin

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 02:41 AM

I apologize i did not read carefully enough - you may cancel repairs when they startup and move to advanced repair where you get to a command line to do a chkdsk but honestly it sounds like you are beyond that point... and more to the the point to finding whether the hard drive failed or whether the motherboard took a fatal blow so to speak.

Edited by AngryRaisin, 08 July 2013 - 02:41 AM.


#5 dpunisher

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 09:32 AM

If you have any data on that hard drive you value, best get it off there quickly before you run a lot of diagnostic tests on it.  Every test you run increases the chances of further damage and data loss.


I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#6 J Moldy

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 01:21 PM

Alright, again, how do I get the data off there? I can't get it to start.



#7 dpunisher

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 04:31 PM

Pull the hard drive and either install it in another system as a data drive, or get a USB adapter or enclosure and use that to examine the disk and pull data from it.  You might be able to boot from a Linux live disk and access files as well, but that tends to spin up the hard drive more.


I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)





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