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Issues after running AVG PC TuneUp & AVG Automatic Maintenance


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#1 Machiavella

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 02:55 PM

I am currently using Windows XP Professional, Version 2002, Service Pack 3, '32-bit' operating system.

 

When prompted I elected to install the three day trial offered and performed the PC Tune Up and Maintenance - as soon as the trial concluded I began experiencing difficulties. I no longer am able to perform any type of download - I have been unable to implement or successfully install any updates from Windows, the AVG Antivirus Free Edition was removed and I am in no way able to reinstall it. In my attempts to do so – I receiving error messages that read:

 

  • ALERT! C:\DOCUME~1\ADMINI~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\wcSYdILl.exe.part could not be saved, because you cannot change the contents of that folder. Change the folder properties and try again, or try saving in a different location.
  • C:\DOCUME~1\ADMINI~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\wcSYdILl.exe.part could not be saved, because the source file could not be read. Try again later, or contact the server administrator.

 

Microsoft Update installation error messages read:

 

  • Installation Failure Error Code: 0xD0000135

 

My key concern is that when I then proceeded to attempt to uninstall it - I am prompted with a cautioning that contains the following data should I choose to proceed...

 

You have achieved the following optimizations since program installation:

  • Maintenance Tasks: 440 registry problems fixed, 9 broken shortcuts deleted,221 temporary files deleted - After removal you will no longer be able to use the AVG PC TuneUp Maintenance Options!
  • Live Optimization: 113 Uses for improving speed - After removal your PC will no longer be optimized in real time!
  • Gain Disk Space: 154MB free disk space gained - With Removal you lose the tools for freeing up disk space!

 

I am deeply apprehensive as to what the outcome will be if I elect to uninstall it and whether all the above named problems will profoundly affect my being able to continue to operate XP - I have so much vital information on it that I am petrified of making matters worse.

 

If anyone could very kindly suggest what I may feasibly do to keep XP fully operational and recapture the ability to perform downloads I would be forever and always in your debt!

 

 



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 03:16 PM

Step One:  Uninstall PC Tuneup.

 

Step Two:  Run the chkdsk /r command.  Start/Run...type chkdsk /r and hit Enter.  Type Y in new screen, hit Enter.  Reboot.  The command will run before the system boots into Windows, system boots into Windows automatcally upon completion of chkdsk /r command.

 

Step Three:  Run the sfc /scannow command.

 

How To Use SFC Scannow to Repair Windows System Files - http://pcsupport.about.com/od/toolsofthetrade/ht/sfc-scannow.htm

 

How to perform a SFC -SCANNOW without the CD - TeachNovice Q&A - http://www.teachnovice.com/152/how-to-perform-a-sfc-scannow-without-the-cd

 

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons

 

    a. Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

 

    b. Per http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Registry , “the Windows registry stores all application settings in one logical repository (but a number of discrete files) and in a standardized form.  The registry contains important configuration information for the operating system, for installed applications as well as individual settings for each user and application. A careless change to the operating system configuration in the registry could cause irreversible damage, so it is usually only installer programs which perform changes to the registry database during installation/configuration and removal.  If a user wants to edit the registry manually, Microsoft recommends that a backup of the registry is performed before the change.  Editing the registry is sometimes necessary when working around Windows-specific issues e.g. problems when logging onto a domain can be resolved by editing the registry.  The Windows registry can be edited manually using programs such as regedit.exe, although these tools do not expose some of registry's metadata such as the last modified date.”

 

Per http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Registry_cleanerA registry cleaner is a class of third party software utility designed for the Microsoft Windows operating system, whose purported purpose is to remove redundant items from the Windows registry.  Registry cleaners are not supported by Microsoft, but vendors of Registry cleaners claim that they are useful to repair inconsistencies arising from manual changes to applications, especially COM-based programs.. 

 

The necessity and usefulness of registry cleaners is a controversial topic, with experts in disagreement over their benefits. The problem is further clouded by the fact that malware and scareware are often associated with utilities of this type.There is a popular misconception that the value of registry cleaning lies in reducing "registry bloat". Even a neglected registry will seldom contain more than two or three thousand redundant entries. Bearing in mind that the modern registry may contain more than a million entries, the elimination of two or three thousand will not save any noticeable amount of scanning time.

 

Some registry cleaners make no distinction as to the severity of the errors, and many that do may erroneously categorize errors as "critical" with little basis to support it. It.  Removing or changing certain registry data can prevent the system from starting, or cause application errors and crashes.  A poorly-designed registry cleaner may not be equipped to know for sure whether a key is still being used by Windows or what detrimental effects removing it may have. This may lead to loss of functionality and/or system instability.

 

While it is true that some registry cleaners are safe, these cleaners do not improve performance. The rest are a mix of snake-oil, actual malware, or dangerously powerful tools unsuited to non-professionals.”

 

For the reasons pointed out above and others…BC does not encourage/suggest that any member use a registry cleaner.

 

Louis



#3 Machiavella

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 03:52 PM

...
 

Dear Louis

 

Thank you so very, very much for your timely advice! I wonder if I might further bother you with a related problem please?

 

In XP I am using Outlook Express and I believe I have made quite a mess trying to restore what I suspect may have been and issue with files being compacted by use of the above mentioned AVG. programs...

 

The contents of those emails are critical to an ongoing legal matter [contents pertaining to a very lengthy stalking log] - I have just posted the issue as a separate matter in the: Internet & Networking Web Browsing/Email and Other Internet Applications forum after reading the new user guide and adhering to the advice that states: "When you post, it makes sense to follow the rule: one problem, one post."

 

Would you be so very kind as to look over the entry I have just made there? I am deeply concerned by the fact that I have dragged files that I have subsequently and most likely incorrectly renamed to the desktop. The files are sitting on the desktop still - however; I am unable to restore them in either Outlook Express or drag them back to Message Store...

 

I would assume I would need to correct that issue before I proceed with your very kind instructions? However; I do not seem to be able to shift them back in the same manner in which I so readily dragged them across?

 

I am so very inexplicably grateful for your time, careful consideration, direction and expert advice - your further opinion on this particularly scary issue would be beyond wonderful!

 

Kind regards and my every sincere gratitude - Ms Phoenix

 



#4 hamluis

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 07:49 PM

Well...I can't advise you on the effects...or counters...for the program that you used.

 

I can tell you how IE works.

 

All .dbx files are encrypted and stored in the message store used by OE.  You can have more than 1 message store on a system...but OE will only use one and that is the one designated by the settings a user employs in OE regarding message storage.

 

If you have a store (a group of encrypted .dbx files) which you cannot import...that's a problem and I would suspect that the files are damaged.

 

You may want to visit Inside Outlook Express - http://www.insideoe.com/ .  You might also look at:

 

An Outlook Express basic repair kit - http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2398839

File Corruption in Outlook Express - http://www.microsoft.com/windows/IE/community/columns/filecorruption.mspx#EDAA

 

Louis



#5 Machiavella

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 09:17 AM

Dear Louis and All Other wonderful Forum Members

 

I diligently followed steps 1 through 3 - after final reboot - XP will not even remain open for 5 seconds before shutting itself down even in Safe Mode... and attempting to restart...

 

I have only now just managed to get the Advanced Options Menu to stabilize - I would be inexplicably grateful if anyone could provide any guidance on how I would now best proceed from this super scary place?

Please Help? Kind regards and my every gratitude - Ms Phoenix

Step One: Uninstall PC Tuneup.
Step Two: Run the chkdsk /r command. Start/Run...type chkdsk /r and hit Enter. Type Y in new screen, hit Enter. Reboot. The command will run before the system boots into Windows, system boots into Windows automatically upon completion of chkdsk /r command.
Step Three: Run the sfc /scannow command.



#6 hamluis

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 11:30 AM

System manufacturer and model?

 

Do you have a MS Genuine XP install CD?

 

I don't understand why you installed this PC Tuneup application...what problems were you having and when did they begin?

 

<<I have only now just managed to get the Advanced Options Menu to stabilize>>

 

I have no idea...what you are referring to or what you are trying to tell us.  What advanced options menu, for what?  What did you do to get it to "stabilize"?

 

Louis



#7 Machiavella

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 05:25 AM

Dear Louis & all other Wonderful bleepingcomputer.com Forum Members

 

I am so sorry for the delay in my reply - [we are in different time zones...] / I am unspeakably grateful to hear back from you!

 

I am so sorry! I am not very practiced in these affairs - someone set my system up for me [they are completely uncontactable and are currently in Peru right now!]

From my very limited understanding - they thought it best to install the virtual machine because a number of programs like OE and other very costly design programs I am very reliant on were incompatible with Windows 7 when that became standard issue with all new machines.

Information as was requested earlier:

 

System manufacturer and model?

OS Version: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium, Service Pack 1, 64 bit
Processor: Intel® Core™ i3 CPU M 380 @ 2.53GHz, Intel64 Family 6 Model 37 Stepping 5
Processor Count: 4
RAM: 3892 Mb
Graphics Card: Intel® HD Graphics, 1722 Mb
Hard Drives: C: Total - 170576 MB, Free - 22963 MB; D: Total - 115609 MB, Free - 22689 MB;
Motherboard: SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS CO., LTD., RV411/RV511/E3511/S3511
Antivirus: avast! Antivirus, Updated and Enabled

From what I could determine before losing access to XP was that it is:
Windows XP Professional, Version 2002, Service Pack 3, '32-bit' operating system.

 

Do you have a MS Genuine XP install CD?

No - my understanding is that the program was downloaded as Win7′s XP Mode is a free and fully functional version of XP Professional SP3 that runs entirely inside Windows 7.

 

I don't understand why you installed this PC Tune-Up application...

AVG AntiVirus Free Edition was installed within the virtual machine at the time it was created. AVG free Edition had worked splendidly - and when I was prompted to elect to trial tune-up, optimization and maintenance - I did not think that there was ANY reason not to trust product or added services from the company. The virtual machine was a little "sluggish" - and therefore thought [admittedly quite foolishly] that this may assist with optimizing performance.

 

What problems were you having and when did they begin?

When prompted I elected to install the three day trial offered and performed the PC Tune-Up and Maintenance - as soon as the trial concluded I began experiencing difficulties. From that point I was no longer able to:

  • perform any type of download
  • was unable to implement or successfully install any updates from Windows
  • the AVG Antivirus Free Edition was removed and there was no way I was successfully able to reinstall it. In my attempts to do so – I began receiving error messages that read:

 

ALERT! C:\DOCUME~1\ADMINI~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\wcSYdILl.exe.part could not be saved, because you cannot change the contents of that folder. Change the folder properties and try again, or try saving in a different location.

C:\DOCUME~1\ADMINI~1\LOCALS~1\Temp\wcSYdILl.exe.part could not be saved, because the source file could not be read. Try again later, or contact the server administrator.

Microsoft Update installation error messages read: Installation Failure Error Code: 0xD0000135

 

My key concern was that when I then proceeded to uninstall it - I was prompted with a cautioning that contained the following data should I choose to proceed...

 

You have achieved the following optimizations since program installation:

  • Maintenance Tasks: 440 registry problems fixed, 9 broken shortcuts deleted,221 temporary files deleted - After removal you will no longer be able to use the AVG PC Tune-Up Maintenance Options!
  • Live Optimization: 113 Uses for improving speed - After removal your PC will no longer be optimized in real time!
  • Gain Disk Space: 154MB free disk space gained - With Removal you lose the tools for freeing up disk space!

That is when I posted the issue I was then experiencing and subsequently followed your very generous advice to the letter being:

Step One: Uninstall PC Tune-Up.
Step Two: Run the chkdsk /r command. Start/Run...type chkdsk /r and hit Enter. Type Y in new screen, hit Enter. Reboot. The command will run before the system boots into Windows, system boots into Windows automatically upon completion of chkdsk /r command.
Step Three: Run the sfc /scannow command.

 

In the articles you so very thoughtfully suggested I refer to in performing these tasks – the one titled:

  • “How To Use SFC /Scannow to Repair Protected Windows Operating System Files” further instructs in step 4 to: Restart your computer if sfc /scannow did actually repair any files. Note: System File Checker may or may not prompt you to restart but even if it doesn't, you should restart anyway.

Just before the final restart – everything looked fine. Once I did perform the restart – that was when XP would no longer successfully boot at all - well to be more accurate – it began to crash and attempt to restart and continue to do the same over and over…

In complete desperation I started to search for any advice that could advise me on what the best course of action may be – I came across the following article: "Some Things to Try If Windows XP Crashes During Boot" - http://kkomp.com/STTWCBD.pdf

… It stated:

 

Windows XP can be a funny old sod at times. Sometimes and for no apparent reason it’ll go wonky even while you boot it up; even if your last session appeared flawless. In a lot of cases this is because it failed to load a driver properly. The result can be a number of things: It could fail to boot with a BSOD during boot-up, it could give you a malformed or scrambled picture on the monitor due to having loaded the graphics driver incorrectly, it might boot but not work properly, –  sometimes followed by a BSOD, or numerous other things.

 

If this happens then shut it down again in the normal manner, if you can, and try booting it up again. In numerous cases it’ll boot up properly the next time, and everything will be fine.

 

But what if the same problem occurs again when you try to boot it again? Well, if it’s happened twice then the probability is that it’ll occur a third time; so it’s time to take action.

 

This solution works sometimes; other times it doesn’t; but it’s the easiest solution of all, so it’s worth a try before you try anything else:

 

  • Press your computer’s power button to switch it on, and as soon as you do that repeatedly press the F8 key. One of two things should happen after the initial BIOS screen appears; depending upon the motherboard you have fitted inside your box:

 

Either it’ll open up a boot-menu screen, or it’ll bypass this step and go straight to the next step. If it does open a boot-menu screen, (Primary Hard drive, CD-ROM, Floppy, etc.) we don’t need that, so don’t change anything there, just hit the Esc key, and as soon as you press the Esc key, repeatedly hit F8 again. The Windows Advanced Options Menu should appear. This is white text on a dark-grey background. The options open to you are:

 

Safe Mode

Safe Mode With Networking

Safe Mode With Command Prompt

Enable Boot Logging

Enable VGA Mode

Last Known Good Configuration (your most recent settings that worked)

Directory services Restore Mode (Windows domain controllers only)

Debugging Mode

Disable automatic restart on system failure

Start Windows Normally

Reboot

Return to OS Choices Menu

 

In this case we want “Last Known Good Configuration (your most recent settings that worked)”, so use the down and up arrow keys to highlight this line. Press enter. Forget the other options for the time being. In this part of this report we’ll deal with that one only.

 

On the next screen you’ll see “Please select the operating system to start.” If you’ve only installed a single installation of Windows XP then your choice will already be highlighted and you just press Enter again. If your machine has on a dual-boot and/or you see more than a single operating system; use the up and down arrow keys to select the operating system that you were just trying to boot into, (Windows XP.) and then press Enter.

 

Windows will start to boot; except this time it looks in the System Volume Information folders on your hard-drive for a setting it used before when that driver loaded correctly. If it finds it then it’ll load it into the boot sequence and proceed with boot. If it doesn’t and still encounters the problem then the crash that happened before will probably happen again. But that behavior is covered in another part of this report.

 

This operation thus far may solve your problem, and then again it might not. If it does solve the problem then I suggest that you allow the computer to fully boot, and then restart it again, just so that the new settings that work are written to the registry before you do anything else.

 

Part 2

This is part 2 of the series. I’m assuming you’ve already read Part 1. In Part 1 - we brought up the Windows Advanced Options Menu:

 

Safe Mode

Safe Mode With Networking

Safe Mode With Command Prompt

Enable Boot Logging

Enable VGA Mode

Last Known Good Configuration (your most recent settings th

at worked)

Directory Services Restore Mode (Windows

domain controllers only)

Debugging Mode

Disable automatic restart on system failure

Start Windows

Normally

Reboot

Return to OS Choices Menu

 

We selected the option “Last Known Good Configuration (your most recent settings that worked)”, but that still hasn’t worked and your Windows XP computer still won’t boot: Either it’s crashing with a BSOD as it boots up, or it’s just not working at all well when it has apparently booted up fully. The screen is scrambled, there are things missing, whatever. This time we’re going to try something else. Does your computer crash and restart or go to a BSOD? Does your computer automatically restart when it crashes? There’s nothing wrong about that in itself, but if it does so then you don’t get the chance to read the data presented on the BSOD. The first thing we need to do is to stop the computer from automatically restarting every time it crashes, in order that you can study the BSOD.

Go to the Windows Advanced Options Menu and use the up and down arrow keys to select “Disable automatic restart on system failure”. Press Enter. Allow the computer to reboot and to crash again. You should now be able to study the blue screen. (BSOD) On the blue screen you’ll see the reason why the computer crashed, some tips which might or might not help, and some  “Technical Information”, aka gibberish. The gibberish is probably the most important part of it all. First, though, try following the stated tips to whatever extent possible. I suggest photographing the blue screen with a digital camera: You might need the information later on, and the screen might not be accessible at the time you need it.

 

Hopefully this also covers your questions regarding?: <<I have only now just managed to get the Advanced Options Menu to stabilize>> I have no idea...what you are referring to or what you are trying to tell us.  What advanced options menu, for what?  What did you do to get it to "stabilize"?

 

I followed the above instructions up until that point and managed to take a screenshot which I have also included here. I thought it best to stop playing about with something that is so very far beyond my personal scope of comprehension.

I am so sorry to lean on you and the other countless numbers of wonderful forum members in this way and for being so typically over-emotional [panic stricken would be a far more accurate description] - but I really am desperate to rectify the problem - so much of my vital information and tools I rely on are all only accessible and operational from the XP virtual machine.

I am indescribably grateful for your time, concern – your well-considered and most timely advice – I’m just praying now that you or one of the other amazing forum members have come across something like this before and can assist in advising how I proceed from this very ugly mammoth mess I have created…

Yours very sincerely – Ms. Phoenix.

 

 

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#8 hamluis

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Posted 07 July 2013 - 05:24 PM

I don't know anything about virtual mahines...but if System Restore was set up...I would try to employ it to go back to a restore point before you installed this AVG program.

 

System Restore Info - http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;%5BLN%5D;267951

 

Louis






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