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THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!


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#1 knotty panda

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 03:22 PM

I got hit with the System Antivirus a few hours ago.  It zoomed past my security software and decimated it.  Nothing worked.  It disabled every program I had.  I couldn't get to Malwarebytes to run a scan.  I could, however, get on the internet.  How else would they collect my money if I couldn't get on the internet!

 

Luckily, from reading your site, I had Malwarebytes and RootKill saved to a jump drive which I update on the first every month -- just in case.

 

I rebooted in Safe Mode, ran Malwarebytes (I had just cleaned my computer on the first, two days ago) and there were 10 new viruses; 3 of which were registry infections.  I zapped those, ran RootKill, and here I am!  All clean again!

 

I would have never known what to do if it wasn't for your site.

 

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU!

 

 



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#2 quietman7

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 04:54 PM

Thanks for the kind words and you're welcome on behalf of the Bleeping Computer community.

Now you should Create a New Restore Point (alternate method) to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been backed up, renamed and saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Click the Start Orb and in the Search box type: Create a restore point.
  • When the System Properties window opens, under the System Protection tab, select the Create... button at the bottom. Give the restore point a name, then click "Create". The new restore point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the newly created Restore Point.

Windows 8, Vista and Windows XP users can refer to these links:
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#3 knotty panda

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 07:43 PM

Yes, I did a new restore point, but what I didn't know about was the Disk Cleanup.  Gonna go do that right now!  I can't tell you what a useful and cost-effective site this is for us peeps who know next to nothing.  I am a student with about $2,000 in school-related software.  I can't imagine what it would have been like to reload, reformat, and set-up new files.  I am so grateful!



#4 quietman7

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 07:44 PM


:thumbup2: Tips to protect yourself against malware and reduce the potential for re-infection
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#5 knotty panda

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:10 PM

You have brought something new to light; something shocking which could possibly affect an entire industry. 

 

I am a scopist.  A scopist finalizes the court transcript for a court reporter.  As the internet has closed the distance between court reporter and scopist, court reporters are downloading transcripts to P2P file sharing sites which is then retrieved by the scopist, revised, then retransmitted back in the same method.  The most common P2P sharing site being DropBox.

 

The reasons for using these sites are: 1) nearly instantaneous file transfer, 2) court files are too voluminous for email, 3) they are nearly always accompanied by audio files.  I have never doubted the security of transferring these sensitive documents via DropBox.  Now, after reading the accompanied advisory, I have concerns.

 

These files generally are created with CAT-software; i.e., Eclipse or CaseCAT which could not be deciphered without the corresponding software.  However, sometimes ASCII or .rtf files are utilized.

 

Should this industry begin to look elsewhere for a method of file transfer?

 

Thanks!



#6 quietman7

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:42 PM

I do not have any experience with CAT software and don't know much about it other than what I can find doing a Google search. According to Wikipedia, CAT is a broad and imprecise term covering a range of tools, from the simple to the complicated. While this type of software may have security advantages normal file sharing does not I would be concerned since it is being used in conjunction with P2P environments. Your concerns would best be addressed by the government IT Techs who service the court's network where you work.
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