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Would like to better utilize what I have just don't know how


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#1 cfox73

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 08:28 AM

I have an ASUS laptop 

with 1 Drive c: (OS) (Fixed) (Total:279.45 GB) (Free:196.05 GB) 

2 Drive d: (DATA) (Fixed) (Total:394.18 GB) (Free:394.02 GB) 
I have not used the d drive, I guess I don't really know how or what to do with it. It seems like a huge waste just sitting there. Please advise.


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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 08:55 AM

You have no music, movies, downloaded video, pictures, backups, or  documents?

 

Think about all of the stuff you would want to keep in the event you get an error/virus/malware that requires you to nuke and reinstall your OS.


I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#3 cfox73

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 09:15 AM

So, what you're saying is, that d: drive is basically like a thumb drive etc.. that is always connected to my computer and I would use it as such? It would not fall prey to the virus etc. that my OS might get? 



#4 dpunisher

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 11:01 AM

Exactly.  Usually data will outrun your OS/apps as far as storage space is concerned.  It is just convenient to have the option, when all else fails, of being able to throw in a bootdisk and have a restored system 20 minutes later, and not have to worry about losing your data during the process.  I usually keep a monthly backup of my Internet Favorites, cookies and Outlook files (I'm oldschool) so after the restore, 3 "imports" and I am good to go.

 

As far as viruses, they will have an effect on your drive with your OS and apps (.exe).  Viruses can hide on a "DATA" drive, but that is what an antivirus program is for.


I am a retired Ford tech. Next to Fords, any computer is a piece of cake. (The cake, its not a lie)

3770K @4.5, Corsair H100, GTX780, 16gig Samsung, Obsidian 700 (yes there is a 700)


#5 smax013

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 03:53 PM

Exactly.  Usually data will outrun your OS/apps as far as storage space is concerned.  It is just convenient to have the option, when all else fails, of being able to throw in a bootdisk and have a restored system 20 minutes later, and not have to worry about losing your data during the process.  I usually keep a monthly backup of my Internet Favorites, cookies and Outlook files (I'm oldschool) so after the restore, 3 "imports" and I am good to go.
 
As far as viruses, they will have an effect on your drive with your OS and apps (.exe).  Viruses can hide on a "DATA" drive, but that is what an antivirus program is for.


I definitely agree. It is always best to have you data on a separate drive or partition. Makes life much easier if you ever do need to reinstall Windows.

It also make purely backing up your boot "drive" (i.e. OS and applications) much easier as you can image (or even clone, although in the Windows world cloning usually forces you to clone the whole drive) that partition to backup drive without it being cluttered up by files. And that backup can be done much less frequently than what you would want to do for backup that is backing up your data files.

In your case (you said it was a laptop), odds are it is a second partition on the same drive rather than a whole second physical drive. Most laptops only support one physical drive, although there are some (typically 17" laptops) that can accept two drives. Personally, I prefer a second physical drive for the data (then if the boot drive bites the dust, I just pull it and replace it...and my data is safe), but then that is just not realistic with laptops typically.

If you are currently storing all your documents in the "My Documents"/"Documents" (the name depends on which Windows OS you are using), then it is rather easy to move the actual folder location to D: drive from the C: drive. This is the likely case as the default location to store files for Windows and most Windows applications is in the "My Documents"/"Documents" folder. If you tell us which Windows OS you are using, we can point you to some instructions for "moving" that folder (it is nominally the same for the various versions of Windows, but there are some slight differences).

#6 cfox73

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 08:18 PM

I am using Windows 8 64 bit. 

Besides the documents, is there a way to move the my pictures folder, or would it be basically the same idea?



#7 smax013

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 09:29 PM

I am using Windows 8 64 bit. 
Besides the documents, is there a way to move the my pictures folder, or would it be basically the same idea?


http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_8-files/how-to-move-user-folders-to-2nd-drive-in-windows-8/f58029d0-bfcf-4fab-a266-a56f6d9e65b5

Take a look at the "Most Helpful Answer" for how to "move" the My Documents folder to another drive.

This should also move the Pictures folder as well, I believe (it does on older versions of Windows).

#8 hamluis

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 06:02 PM

You don't need to move any of the folders in "MYland"...just move the contents of the folders to another partition.  The folders are system folders put there long ago for convenience at the time...there is no need at all to use them for anything.  A user can create her/his own hierarchy of folders reflecting all videos, docs, etc..on another partition, set up in any order desired.

 

Louis



#9 smax013

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 08:17 PM

You don't need to move any of the folders in "MYland"...just move the contents of the folders to another partition.  The folders are system folders put there long ago for convenience at the time...there is no need at all to use them for anything.  A user can create her/his own hierarchy of folders reflecting all videos, docs, etc..on another partition, set up in any order desired.
 
Louis


Yes, you don't really have to "move" the My Documents folder, but it sure makes life a lot easier. Many applications attempt to place files somewhere in the My Documents folder by default. While you can usually change that default if you want, it is typically easier to just move the My Documents folder since Windows provides an easy mechanism to do that.

Note that "move" is not really 100% as the various My Documents, etc folders that you access through the typical ways in Windows are actually more like "links" to an actual set of folders/subfolders that you can then move to where ever you want. You don't move the My Documents, etc folders...rather you move the folders those "links" point to.




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