Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Life Expectancy of a Linux Flash Drive.


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Bezukhov

Bezukhov

    Bleepin' Jazz Fan!


  • Members
  • 2,718 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Providence, R.I.
  • Local time:04:33 AM

Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:30 AM

So how long can a flash drive last when it is used to boot a Linux OS? I hear all sorts of horror stories that they degrade quickly, on the other hand I have a $10 16GB Sandisk that I purchased several months ago that is still purring along, even after I installed ( and not as a Live set up) and removed several versions of Linux. Not to mention that it is used for around 18 to 20 hour per week. Granted, flash drives today are not all that expensive, still, it would be nice to hear what others have gone through.

 

So what are your experiences?  Any brands that you would recommend?


To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Zen Seeker

Zen Seeker

  • Members
  • 695 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:03:33 AM

Posted 05 July 2013 - 08:20 AM

I've used a locakble Kanguru 8GB USB stick for 3+ years with 3 or 4 different live linux releases. It's been dedicated for this role only and has never failed or given me issue. The only time it's unlocked is when I flash a new image with security updates, about once every 2 or 3 months.

 

That being said I've had a cheap Staples 4GB USB stick go nuts about 3 months after buying it.  :c(



#3 Bezukhov

Bezukhov

    Bleepin' Jazz Fan!

  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2,718 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Providence, R.I.
  • Local time:04:33 AM

Posted 09 July 2013 - 04:28 AM

I'll look into buying one of those Kangarus. Staples carries them but only for online purchase. I don't shop online, my motto is cash and carry.  But they're pretty accomodating at the local Staples and I guess they would order one for me.

 

And for some sad news that Sandisk I was extolling just a week ago shuffled off this mortal coil shortly after posting this topic.


Edited by Bezukhov, 09 July 2013 - 04:29 AM.

To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#4 Zen Seeker

Zen Seeker

  • Members
  • 695 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:03:33 AM

Posted 09 July 2013 - 11:12 AM

I hear you. I only do cash and carry as well. I just happen to live in a very computer and accessory available area so can find what I need in a few local stores. (Canadacomputers.com)

 

You don't NEED a Kangarus, it was just the only lockable one I could find local which I needed, but stick to trusted name brands for important data storage just in case. Doesn't mean it's always better but you have a better chance than with a new over seas vendor selling cheap units.

 

Sadly Sandisk I would have considered a safe bet....



#5 Bezukhov

Bezukhov

    Bleepin' Jazz Fan!

  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 2,718 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Providence, R.I.
  • Local time:04:33 AM

Posted 25 July 2013 - 03:51 AM

The prices on those Kangarus were outrageous! 

 

Luckily they had 16Gb PNYs for $9 a pop. And I read somewhere, but I can't remember where i saw it,  that USB drives should be formatted to ext2 when installing Linux. Something to do with ext3 and 4 using a journaling system, or some such.


To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#6 Zen Seeker

Zen Seeker

  • Members
  • 695 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:03:33 AM

Posted 26 July 2013 - 02:04 PM

I believe, but am to lazy to look it up right now, that the Ext3/4 shorten the life span of the device. I've read the same of SD cards being used for smart phones when used with applications like Mounts2SD or S2E. That said I still use Ext4 on a Lexar and Sandisk SD card for two Gio's. Hasn't been an issue in two years, yet, and now most of these apps support Ext4.

 

Either way glad your happy and I hope it works out for you!



#7 weak_solder

weak_solder

  • Members
  • 1 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:03:33 AM

Posted 07 November 2013 - 09:37 AM

I absolutely love Corsair and Sandisk for flash memory. Right now my main work tool is a year-old 16 gig sandisk with Hirens, Falcon4, ubcd, knoppix, mint, crunchbang, tails, deft, kali, tinycore, a host of bootable anti-virus like F-secure and AVG rescue, my portable firefox with a ton of feeds and add-ons, and also software and anti-virus for when I'm actually in windows. And yes, there's still like 150 mb free :) I plan to upgrade to the USB 3.0 Sandisk Extreme with 170 MBps write speed and 190 MBps read, which will dramatically decrease loading linux and firefox, as my current drive is a fraction of that speed.

 

This drive is used all day as I'm a bench technician and it's for work, often for many hours at a time and it does heat up which decreases the life expectancy of almost anything electronic, but so far its read/write speeds are the same as when I purchased it over a year ago, so far as I can tell.

 

There is a good blog post HERE about flash expectancy, including how some companies state as low as 10,000 writes, versus 1,000,000 with others.

 

Also, I used Your Universal Multiboot Installer or YUMI to get like 20 distros and dos tools on my drive VERY easily, it's for Windows and Linux.


Edited by weak_solder, 07 November 2013 - 09:38 AM.


#8 cat1092

cat1092

    Bleeping Cat


  • BC Advisor
  • 7,018 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Carolina, USA
  • Local time:04:33 AM

Posted 25 March 2014 - 11:25 PM

Stay away from no-name brands often found on online auctions & even some discount (liquidation) chains that sells off the wall brands when buying Flash/SD drives. Out of my collection of Flash drives accumulated over the years, the only one of these that have died on me was a no-mame one, purchased on eBay.

 

Warranty should play a factor also, I walk away from those with less than a 5 year warranty, lifetime is ideal. Because the fact is, not if, these will wear out when using to running an OS on regularly. The best one can hope for is that it will begin to slow, giving the user a warning. However, that's not often the case & if so, many won't notice it until it's too late.

 

It's always best to keep a spare on hand, preferably USB3 at today's prices. It's likely that USB2 Flash drives, just like SATA2 HDD/SSD's has for the most part, will fade into the sunset.

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users