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Laptop Wont Charge After CPU Replacement HELP :(


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#1 adiwalsh

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 12:26 PM

So I disassembled my HP laptop and replaced the CPU, only to find out that the new CPU I bought was not supported by my motherboard, I took the laptop apart again and put the old CPU in. After the old CPU had been put back in I started the laptop and it was working fine, I was using it for atleast half an hour until the battery needed charging, I plugged in my charger but the computer didn't charge and nothing came up on the taskbar to say it was charging. The laptop has now gone completely dead and I can't charge it. I know I havent damaged the HDD, RAM, or CPU because I had it working fine before the battery died.  I have taken it apart to check everything is connected how it should be twice, it is all exactly how it should be.

 

The charger and bettery were working fine before I first took the computer apart. Have I damaged something else or is there a way of fixing it? Thanks

 



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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 06:22 PM

It could be a horrible coincidence, and your charger has just died. If you plug it into the wall and not the computer and check the voltage at the plug where it connects to the computer you should get about 19 - 20 V. Most chargers also have a telltale LED which lights up when they are working. If you have neither the voltage or the LED, then check the fuse.

 

If you have the 19 - 20 volts at the end of the cable, then it is probably a fault at the input end of the computer socket, where it connects to the motherboard. These are known to be fragile. Check carefully for cracks or broken solder joints around the area where the socket mates onto the motherboard. If you are a competent solderer, broken joints can be re-soldered. Cracks in the motherboard itself almost certainly means a new motherboard. Sorry I can't be more positive.

 

Chris Csogrove



#3 adiwalsh

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 02:14 PM

Hi, I checked the charger and that is working fine so it is definetly something with the computer itself. The charge input socket part isnt soldered to the motherboard, it connects with a little 4 pin plug, do you think I could have damaged the pins or something when plugging it back onto the motherboard?



#4 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 04:50 PM

I knew some Sonys had this feature, but I didn't know that some HPs used it as well. That makes it (a) much less stressful, and (B) cheaper !

 

I am assuming that the socket on the mobo has the pins. It is just possible that you might have bent one of them, but unlikely. However it would do no harm to check visually. Should one be bent, a fine screwdriver or very fine pair of pliars should straighten it enough for it to work. It is at least equally possible that you didn't refit the plug properly - check that it is properly seated, and, although it should only be possible to connect one way round, that it is the correct way round.

 

If you have no bent pins and the plug is properly seated, then you are looking at damage to the power socket on the computer and its little connecting cable to this 4 pin plug. If you have a reasonably fine probe on a multi meter, you can do a connectivity test between the input side of the power socket and the plug onto the mobo. If you don't have a fine probe - and I don't - you can do what I do. I have a pair of leads I made for my meter with spring clips on the end. Just clip a bit of stiff wire into the spring clip and use that as a probe.

 

If the problem turns out to be between the socket on the side of your laptop and this plug, the good news is that as far as I know, this item is replaceable and available - and a significant amount cheaper than a mobo !

 

Chris Cosgrove



#5 adiwalsh

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 03:49 PM

I knew some Sonys had this feature, but I didn't know that some HPs used it as well. That makes it (a) much less stressful, and ( B) cheaper !

 

I am assuming that the socket on the mobo has the pins. It is just possible that you might have bent one of them, but unlikely. However it would do no harm to check visually. Should one be bent, a fine screwdriver or very fine pair of pliars should straighten it enough for it to work. It is at least equally possible that you didn't refit the plug properly - check that it is properly seated, and, although it should only be possible to connect one way round, that it is the correct way round.

 

If you have no bent pins and the plug is properly seated, then you are looking at damage to the power socket on the computer and its little connecting cable to this 4 pin plug. If you have a reasonably fine probe on a multi meter, you can do a connectivity test between the input side of the power socket and the plug onto the mobo. If you don't have a fine probe - and I don't - you can do what I do. I have a pair of leads I made for my meter with spring clips on the end. Just clip a bit of stiff wire into the spring clip and use that as a probe.

 

If the problem turns out to be between the socket on the side of your laptop and this plug, the good news is that as far as I know, this item is replaceable and available - and a significant amount cheaper than a mobo !

 

Chris Cosgrove

 

 

Hi again. I used the multimeter to test connectivity throught the power socket. It is actually 8 pin with 7 wires, not 4 pin.  With the connectivity test 1 of the 7 wires was connected to the inside part of the charger socket and 2 of the wires are connected to the outer part of the charger port. With only 3 of 7 wires connected to where the charger plugs in does that mean the port is broken and a new one will fix this problem? There is a small LED on the port which lights up when the laptop is charging and flashes if you try turn on the laptop while it's flat. Could the other wires be for the led?

 

Thanks for replying.



#6 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 25 June 2013 - 06:04 PM

I am not an expert on HP laptops but I would not have thought so. All that is coming in from the charger is a DC voltage to run the computer when it is connected and to charge the battery at the same time. It is not unusual to have two ground lines and one live, it provides some degree of screening.

 

I suspect you are going to have to have this laptop checked out hands-on by someone who is knowledgeable with HP laptops. It is possible that installing the incorrect CPU has damaged other components on the motherboard. If the processor you tried to install is not pin compatible with the one the board is designed for it is very likely that some of the pins on the CPU mount received incorrect voltages. I think getting it checked out is your best bet.

 

Best of luck,

 

Chris Cosgrove






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