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Hard drive crashed (I think) might need to do data recovery


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#1 alex88xt

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:22 PM

Hello. recently my hard drive died, there is no power, nothing. I don't hear it spinning or anything when I connect it to an external hdd adapter. I have some very important files on the drive and my only concern is getting them off the drive. This is the hard drive I have/need:

 

Seagate 9CA156-302 - 750GB 7.2K RPM 32MB Cache SATA II 3.5" Hard Disk Drive (HDD)

 

I was told that this is the exact part number to the hard drive I have and will need to perform a data recovery (I called a data recovery company asking some questions, not giving away my exact situation because I didn't want them to hussle me). The hard drive is available and I can purchase it anytime, I just want to know how to do the data recovery process myself. I would much rather do the procedure myself than pay for the services. Can someone please advise if they had this situation before? Thanks!



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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 03:52 PM

I look upon it as a good sign when the hard drive does absolutely nothing when it is connected because that means the circuit board might be the problem, and that is a relatively minor fix.  Hard drives that are clicking or noisy usually mean an internal problem.  Internal problems like platter motors and heads/actuators take some skill , and preferably a clean room, to fix/swap.

 

Working on the assumption there is a problem with the circuit board, try to find a replacement hard drive.  Same model for sure, preferably with the same firmware as printed on the tag/sticker.  Not sure if Seagate keeps the firmware on non volatile RAM on the circuitboard, or whether it is on a section of one of the platters.  I am sure a pro will be along to offer better answers.  If it (firmware) is kept on the platter, then as long as you have the same circuit board, you are in business.  Swap circuit boards and cross your fingers.

 

Internal problems, on multiplatter drives are a PITA to fix.  Once you lose platter alignment, kiss your data goodbye.

 

Before you get too involved, ck the simple stuff like the SATA power connector.  Verify there are no cracks or peeled traces.  They do break.  Look for any signs of burned/overheated components on the circuitboard.

 

I have been fortunate.  I have recovered 2 drives by myself via swapping circuitboards (thanx Ebay), and have had to send off 2 (maybe 3 now) for clients for a "professional recovery".  Pros did their job, expensive as hell, but they did their job.

 

Oh, you might put it in a plastic bag and freeze it overnight and try to spin it up.  Keep the plastic on it so you don't run into condensation problems.  Works sometimes, and its cheap to.

 

EDIT:  http://www.datacent.com/datarecovery/hdd/seagate/ST3750330NS

EDIT 2: Possibly:http://www.donordrives.com/seagate-750gb-st3750330ns-fw-sn04-100468979-g-sata-3-5-pcb.html


Edited by dpunisher, 13 June 2013 - 04:16 PM.

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#3 alex88xt

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 09:29 PM

I appreciate all the information! When you say "expensive as hell" in regards to the data recovery, exactly what can these recoveries go for? Approximately how much could that cost? I'm curious. Thanks again for all that information, I will be checking out the drive to see if the problem is visual on the PCB board.



#4 ranchhand_

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 05:42 PM

Professional recovery can run into the thousands. Never below a thousand. First off, try dpunisher's suggestion to put your drive in the freezer for a couple of hours in a sealed plastic bag from which as much of the air has been squeezed out as possible. Take it out and immediately connect it as a slave to a computer and boot up. If you can see your drive in explore, work fast and drag & drop your data files onto the host computer's hard drive. Work fast, when the drive warms up it will fail again. No guarantee, but this works enough times to be worth while giving it a try.


Edited by ranchhand_, 14 June 2013 - 05:47 PM.

Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#5 JHMcG

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 06:28 PM

I have successfully recovered data from some dead drives by swapping the board out, and replacing it with one from an identical drive. Re cost, I knew a Lawyer who only had one HDD on his machine, and it died. Ready ? Cost him $2000.00 to recover his data using a professional Data recovery company. -- EXCELLENT REASON to have AT LEAST 2 HDDs in your computer, preferably more.






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