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Can You Manually Copy Startup Files


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#1 OCD_Computer_Guy

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 06:28 PM

Like amdkmafd.sys? That's where my system hangs and I think my HD is starting to corrupt out. or is there an outside installer that works? Or a way to manually overwrite the file? I have Precise Puppy.

 

Thanks,

 

Mike



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 07:02 PM

You can manually copy any file that doesn't fall under DRM.

 

When you replace a system file, you are doing so with a copy (hopefully from the Windows install disk) or from a stored location on the system.

 

Since, if legit, it's an AMD driver that can be downloaded from http://support.amd.com/us/gpudownload/Pages/index.aspx per http://www.carrona.org/drivers/driver.php?id=amdkmpfd.sys , I would just download it, rather than copy it.

 

Louis



#3 OCD_Computer_Guy

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 03:08 PM

Thanks hamluis, My system is in the "endless startup loop" so I would need to figure out how to break the cycle and copy the file or use the driver installer before boot up. I think if I reinstalled windows it would wipe my data from my previous install.

 

Mike



#4 hamluis

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 03:31 PM

Well...before pursuing a course of action, I like to understand what the cause might be.

 

Reboot loops can be caused by various things...what were you doing that led to your reboot problem?  Please be detailed and honest.

 

Louis



#5 OCD_Computer_Guy

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 01:18 PM

     Oh, my Acer Aspire 5742 is 3+ years old and it has bluescreened me a couple of times on startup, but when I get in I go to DOS and reinstall the startup routines since they may be being overwritten over unstable sectors in that particular partition that windows has created. Using the bootsector commands for rewriting the startup files and boot reset commands.

 

     I get an mountable_boot_volume error. But I can access my files through Puppy. So I think it's more of getting Win 7 to recognize the startup files. Or manually bring up a  'hidden' restore volume from somewhere in the system. If I boot into safe mode, my startup listing starts executing files until it gets down to "rdyboost.sys" where it thinks for a few seconds then goes on down until I get to "amdkmsfd.sys" where I get the hang.

 

     I can't get to repair options as I get the system hang on every advaned option and I have tried the repair disk, Original Disk and a flash drive that boots my original Win 7 through the USB which is faster and one time I got through to the set up page, but mostly, I get hung up on the way to anywhere.

 

I can get in and replace the file, but with linux I have to know where the file is as I don't understand where to look for these types of files within windows.

 

Mike



#6 hamluis

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 02:50 PM

Well...unmountable boot volume errors...can be various things.

 

Could be a problem with boot files...could be a problen with the file system/partition structure...could be a basic hard drive problem.

 

If it's the easy-to-solve alternative, running the chkdsk /r command has been known to overcome it.

 

More options for trying to overcome:

    http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/2605/fixing_the_dreaded_unmountable_boot_volume_error/

 

    http://blog.shimmertechno.com/windows-help/windows7-unmountable-boot/

 

Louis



#7 OCD_Computer_Guy

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 01:04 PM

How can you perform a check disk if you can't access DOS?



#8 hamluis

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 03:45 PM

Not suggesting it...just pointing out pertinent data re unmountable boot volume errors.

 

Louis






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