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I think I found a new dial-up wi-fi Router. The GAC-152. Any thoughts?


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#1 brian2009

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 04:13 PM

http://www.greatarbor.com/products.html

 

Does this look like it would solve my problem trying to use dial-up on a wi-fi system. (In my other posts I explained that I am only capable of using dial-up or satellite where I live.). I looks like it is picky about which ISP it works with.

 

Here is part of it's write-up...

...................................................................................................................

 

  GAC-152 802.11 Lite-N WiFi Dialup Router- Share Dialup via WiFi/LAN Note: WiFi Dial Up routers cannot increase the speed of the dial up connection ! Not Compatible with AOL, NetZero  and Juno !

More and more devices have WiFi wireless connectivity these days. Whether it's an iPhone or Android smartpone, or an iPad,  or a Kindle tablet - you name it, WiFi wireless connectivity is ubiquitous.  While you can walk into any electronics store and find a wireless router which can connect these devices to the Internet over a high speed fiber,  DSL, or cable connection,  what if all you have is  Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) and only dial up capabilities. Sure - many of these wireless devices have cellular access built in  but what use is that if you can't get a decent signal inside your house.  And what happens when you go to your vacation home  in the mountains or a remote beach and all you have is a telehone line to connect you to rest of the world !

The GAC-152 makes a dialup connection to the dial up Internet Service Provider (ISP) of your choice. It even comes programmed with a free dial up ISP*** phone number so that you can start using your WiFi  wireless enabled device without a subscription (long distance phone charges may apply, no guarantee is made of free ISP service availability or performance).   The GAC-152 supports a simplified  (Lite-N) version of the  802.11n WiFi standard  which provides the benefits of extended range/coverage of the 802.11n standard at lower cost. It allows you to be hundreds of feet away from the router  and still use your WiFi device.  It incorporates a  top of the line V.92 standard 56K modem so that you can get the maximum data rate your phoneline can support (usually 40-50 kbps). Need even greater range ? The GAC-152 WiFi antennas are detachable and can be easily replaced with  inexpensive higher gain antennas. And if you eventually move to a broadband service you can continue using the GAC-152  to get high speed WiFi access to the broadband service.

The GAC-152 is compatible with all WiFi devices including PCs running all versions of Windows (Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP, Windows 2000, etc.), all flavors of  Mac OS, and all distributions of  Linux. Other compatible devices include all WiFi smartphones (iPhone, Blackberry, and Android mobiles), tablets (Kindle, Nook, Android, iPad, etc.) and all WiFi gaming devices like the Nintendo DS.  Multiple users can share the dial up connection using either WiFI and/or the 4 LAN ports on the router. For machine to machine applications the GAC-152 incorporates a schedule based dial out feature. It can be configured to dial out at various times of the day or week for a configurable period of time.

A dial-in feature has been  introduced which allows users to connect via the PSTN and their own modems to the GAC router at a remote location and access devices such as IP cameras and PCs.  This substitutes for Remote Access Servers which are expensive and more difficult to configure. A Python based Windows Application is also provided on the CD which allows the dial up connection to be started and stopped remotely from a PC. In addition to this Windows application, an API for remotely starting, stopping or checking status  is available upon request so that this functionality can be embedded into other applications. For even more flexibility the router can be configured with a Schedule to initiate a dialup session at a particular time.

The GAC-152 is compatible with dial up ISPs who do not require specialized PC/MAC software for dial up access and will  definitely work for you if  you  use standard Windows or Mac dial up network connections to make your dial up ISP connection today. Most ISPs are compatible with the GAC-152. On the other hand,  Netzero, Juno and AOL are some of the known ISPs that require special software and are  incompatible with the GAC-152. .....................

 

Thanks

 

 

 



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#2 brian2009

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 04:34 PM

At the bottom of that web page is a method to piece together different parts to "build" an equivalent product using the companies firmware.



#3 smax013

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 06:32 PM

Looks like it might do that job for you (assuming it works with your ISP), but it is a bit on the expensive side.

I have no clue how reliable it will be or how good/bad any customer service might be as I have never heard of this company. Could work great and have great customer service/support...I just don't know.

At the end of day, it is ultimately a choice you will have to make.

#4 brian2009

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 07:25 PM

Looks like it might do that job for you (assuming it works with your ISP), but it is a bit on the expensive side.

I have no clue how reliable it will be or how good/bad any customer service might be as I have never heard of this company. Could work great and have great customer service/support...I just don't know.

At the end of day, it is ultimately a choice you will have to make.

Yeah. It's pricey. But if it works it'll be worth it. I think it might be worth a try.

 

I would have to switch to another ISP but that's no issue.

 

It looks like it's all based upon the TP-LINK TL-MR3220 router.

 

Now I'm wondering if it might be better to buy the newer version of the router which seems to include 3g and 4g in case it arrives here someday. Then I'd have to add the usb modem and use their firmware.

 

As described here:

 

http://www.greatarbor.com/software_instructions.html

 

I'm going to have to think about this.


Edited by brian2009, 10 June 2013 - 07:45 PM.


#5 earlgun

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Posted 06 October 2014 - 06:18 PM

Hey Brian,

 

How did it perform?  Other dial-up folks are interested.  I've been asking about this type of hardware or system for years.  Always got the same answer - no way.






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