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Diamond WiFi repeater problems...driving me insane...please help!


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#1 bgaviator

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 04:42 AM

Hello,
We have a Belkin N router upstairs in the house....I have never had good reception downstairs in the basement, almost non-existent. I ended up buying a Diamond WiFi Repeater, and at first we had no troubles....computers downstairs and my iPhone were able to finally get strong signals down in the basement. Then something happened, and I'm not sure if it's due to two of the 4 computers getting Windows 7 or not. But now the two computers with Windows 7 constantly give IP Address Conflict errors and/or won't connect to the internet. The two Windows XP computers downstairs connected via WiFi have no issues, and my iphone has no issues. I know it's the Diamond Repeater because if I fire up the Windows 7 desktop (connected to the router via cable), it won't connect....as soon as I unplug the repeater, I am able to connect again. Now if I plug the repeater back in after the Windows 7 computers are connected to the internet, then it doesn't seem to have an issue, until the next time I try to start the computer fresh with the repeater already plugged in.

I have emailed Diamond about this, and my response back was as follows, and of course they didn't tell me how to do any of this:
"If your repeater is causing that kind of error, it's because the router is trying to give the same address to the computer and the repeater. If you give either the computer or the repeater a static IP address, your issue should be alleviated."

Ok, I am not very good with networking stuff, so I have no idea how to do this. I tried resetting the Diamond Repeater, and tried finding out if there was a place to change the ip address to a static one, and I can't figure this out. Do I need to be changing the two computers with Windows 7 to static IP Addresses instead of trying to change the repeater? The only problem is that one of the Windows 7 computers is my mother-in-law's laptop, and it's her work computer set up by her company's IT department, so she doesn't want to mess with any settings.

I just find it odd that only the Windows 7 computers are having issues, and not my XPs.

Please help if able, Thank you!

 



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#2 smax013

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 09:10 AM

Hello,
We have a Belkin N router upstairs in the house....I have never had good reception downstairs in the basement, almost non-existent. I ended up buying a Diamond WiFi Repeater, and at first we had no troubles....computers downstairs and my iPhone were able to finally get strong signals down in the basement. Then something happened, and I'm not sure if it's due to two of the 4 computers getting Windows 7 or not. But now the two computers with Windows 7 constantly give IP Address Conflict errors and/or won't connect to the internet. The two Windows XP computers downstairs connected via WiFi have no issues, and my iphone has no issues. I know it's the Diamond Repeater because if I fire up the Windows 7 desktop (connected to the router via cable), it won't connect....as soon as I unplug the repeater, I am able to connect again. Now if I plug the repeater back in after the Windows 7 computers are connected to the internet, then it doesn't seem to have an issue, until the next time I try to start the computer fresh with the repeater already plugged in.

I have emailed Diamond about this, and my response back was as follows, and of course they didn't tell me how to do any of this:
"If your repeater is causing that kind of error, it's because the router is trying to give the same address to the computer and the repeater. If you give either the computer or the repeater a static IP address, your issue should be alleviated."

Ok, I am not very good with networking stuff, so I have no idea how to do this. I tried resetting the Diamond Repeater, and tried finding out if there was a place to change the ip address to a static one, and I can't figure this out. Do I need to be changing the two computers with Windows 7 to static IP Addresses instead of trying to change the repeater? The only problem is that one of the Windows 7 computers is my mother-in-law's laptop, and it's her work computer set up by her company's IT department, so she doesn't want to mess with any settings.

I just find it odd that only the Windows 7 computers are having issues, and not my XPs.

Please help if able, Thank you!


You did not provide the model of the Diamond repeater or the Belkin router.

Are you using a WR300N for the Diamond repeater?

If so, I did not see any instructions in that manual for how you would set a static IP address for the repeater. It did have some instructions for how you set Windows computers to use a static IP address. Here is a PDF of the WR300N manual from the Diamond website:

http://www.dmmdownload.com/downloads/CURRENT/NETWORKING/WR300N_Manual.pdf

Page 30 has instructions for how you setup a static IP for a Windows 7 computer.

You may also want to adjust the range of IP addresses that the Belkin router uses for the DHCP...i.e. "set aside" some IP addresses purely for static IPs. This assumes that the Belkin router supports this...most routers typically do.

#3 bgaviator

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 09:18 AM

I can't go messing with my mother-in-law's work laptop.  So whatever I have to do, I'd like to be able to do it within the repeater if possible. 

Yes its the WR300n.  I will have to try and get the router model tonight. 



#4 smax013

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 09:25 AM

I can't go messing with my mother-in-law's work laptop.  So whatever I have to do, I'd like to be able to do it within the repeater if possible. 
Yes its the WR300n.  I will have to try and get the router model tonight.


If that is the case, you might need to contact the Diamond support folks again and ask how to setup a static IP for the repeater. As I said, I did not see anything in the manual...although I basically skimmed through it, so I might have missed something.

#5 bgaviator

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 01:59 PM

Well I just thought I would update on my situation with the Diamond repeater.  I ended up setting the Windows 7 desktop to a static IP address, and low and behold, it connected to the network just fine and I was still able to use the repeater.  So when my mother-in-law came home with her Windows 7 laptop, I had her boot up, and she still wasn't able to connect.  I set her with a static IP as well, and she was able to connect again. 

So I just find it weird that the two Windows 7 computers have issues, but not the Windows XP computers....is there some quirk with Windows 7?

Also, is it possible to have a different set of rules for my mother-in-law's laptop depending on what network she's connected to?  Can I have her computer use the assigned IP when she's on our home network, but then go back to using a randomly assigned IP when she logs into her workplace network?  thanks.


Edited by bgaviator, 07 June 2013 - 01:59 PM.


#6 smax013

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:51 PM

Just out of curiosity, when you have the Windows 7 computers set to dynamically get an IP address (i.e. set to use DHCP), have you tried going to a command line and use first "ipconfig /release" and then "ipconfig /renew"? This might force the Windows 7 computers to release the IP address that apparently conflicts with the repeater and maybe get a new one that does not.

If that works, then you could recreate a batch file that does that and put it on the desktop that the user could double-click to run and hopefully fix the problem when it happens in the future.

If it does not help, it does appear that you might be able to setup network profiles. I thought of this because the Mac OS (which I tend to use on a more regular basis compared to me Windows computers) has such a feature built into the OS. The idea is that you can setup network profiles with the appropriate network settings for different locations. When you get to the specific location, you just adjust the network profile (in the Mac OS it is called a "location"). For the Mac OS, this is done simply by going to a specific menu item under the ubiquitous Apple menu. I don't believe Windows 7 has a similar function built-in, but I did find this page that provides a link to an opensource tool that will do it:

http://www.addictivetips.com/windows-tips/switch-between-windows-7-tcpip-network-setting-profiles/

I have not used it myself...just found it by a Google search to see if Windows 7 had a similar "location" function to the Mac OS. I also have no idea if it is a "trustworthy" application or not. And considering that the computer you are trying to mainly figure this out for is a "work" computer, I also don't know if it wise to install it on such a computer...or even if you could install it (some companies tend to lock down their computers pretty tight so that uses cannot install software). All that will be up to you...I would suggest that your mother-in-law might want to ask at work if it OK to install such a program.

Edit: Forgot to say that there are likely other programs that do a similar function, maybe some from a more "substantiated" source.

Edited by smax013, 07 June 2013 - 03:12 PM.


#7 bgaviator

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 02:54 PM

I believe we tried that with the desktop, and it would be hit and miss....sometimes it would fix the issue, and other times it did not.  I have not tried it on the Windows 7 laptop. 



#8 smax013

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 03:11 PM

I believe we tried that with the desktop, and it would be hit and miss....sometimes it would fix the issue, and other times it did not.  I have not tried it on the Windows 7 laptop.


When it was hit and miss, would repeatedly trying it get it to eventually to work? If so, then having a batch file that could be double-clicked could still be a way to do it. It would still be a pain...i.e. you might have to double-click/run the batch file multiple times each day when you want to connect, which would not be ideal. If there are not other options, however, then it might be more livable than remembering to manually change the IP to a static IP and then change it back for work.

#9 bgaviator

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Posted 07 June 2013 - 10:44 PM

I called Diamond tech support, and after about 20 mins on the phone they told me the problem had to be with the router, and not their device since the device was acting properly in that when I test it plugged in downstairs, it does amplify the WiFi signal like it should.......yet this damn little device is keeping any of our Windows 7 computers from being able to log in. So either it's still a) the repeater b)the Belkin router or c)something to do with Windows 7. I mean, why would this happen on only the Windows 7 computers and not the computers running XP? After quite a bit of Googling, I did find some other people who have had my same similar issue. One person even had just what I'm describing, only an issue on the Windows 7 computers, but not his XP computers.



#10 bgaviator

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 06:25 AM

What is this Alternate Configuration tab I am reading about?  Could I use something like this to solve our problem?  Set a static IP for the home network in the alternate tab?  I'm just trying to find some automatic way to have her computer go from her works WiFi network, and then be able to conenct to our home wifi network in conjunction with this repeater.....so far the only way I've reliably been able to not have conflicts is to give every device a static IP. 



#11 bgaviator

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 04:38 PM

Ok, so this is incredibly weird. I came home today and fired up the Windows 7 desktop. The repeater was already plugged in downstairs. Of course I get the red x alternative with the yellow ! again for the network connection. I right clicked and opened the Network and Sharing center. I then clicked on "See full map" and I got a message it couldn't show me a map because I haven't established whether this was a home or work connection or something along those lines. So I then went to the Choose Homegroup and Sharing options and I set it to a Home network. It then gave me some kind of password to use to set up other Windows 7 computers on a home network. I looked down in the right corner, and my computer was connected. So out of curiosity I rebooted the computer....computer connected right away to the network again. So then I shut down the computer completely, waited a few seconds and started it back up. This time I got the red x again. Once again I right clicked and opened the Network and Sharing center. I then went to "Change Adapter settings" I opened up the Realtek controller and and clicked on Properties....I then highlighted the TCP/IPv4. I made NO changes....I don't even know what I was looking for. I was just snooping around. I look down in the right corner, and I'm connected to the network again. I did absolutely nothing but just opening different settings pages within the network and sharing center, and all of a sudden my network comes back? That seems very weird to me. Any possible explanations?

#12 smax013

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 06:08 PM

Ok, so this is incredibly weird. I came home today and fired up the Windows 7 desktop. The repeater was already plugged in downstairs. Of course I get the red x alternative with the yellow ! again for the network connection. I right clicked and opened the Network and Sharing center. I then clicked on "See full map" and I got a message it couldn't show me a map because I haven't established whether this was a home or work connection or something along those lines. So I then went to the Choose Homegroup and Sharing options and I set it to a Home network. It then gave me some kind of password to use to set up other Windows 7 computers on a home network. I looked down in the right corner, and my computer was connected. So out of curiosity I rebooted the computer....computer connected right away to the network again. So then I shut down the computer completely, waited a few seconds and started it back up. This time I got the red x again. Once again I right clicked and opened the Network and Sharing center. I then went to "Change Adapter settings" I opened up the Realtek controller and and clicked on Properties....I then highlighted the TCP/IPv4. I made NO changes....I don't even know what I was looking for. I was just snooping around. I look down in the right corner, and I'm connected to the network again. I did absolutely nothing but just opening different settings pages within the network and sharing center, and all of a sudden my network comes back? That seems very weird to me. Any possible explanations?


If I recall correctly, just going into the "edit" screen for IP settings on a network adapter will cause the system to "renew" the IP address (if the settings are set to dynamically get an IP address). So, even though you did not change anything, it was kind like you did change some...in a sense.

What is this Alternate Configuration tab I am reading about?  Could I use something like this to solve our problem?  Set a static IP for the home network in the alternate tab?  I'm just trying to find some automatic way to have her computer go from her works WiFi network, and then be able to conenct to our home wifi network in conjunction with this repeater.....so far the only way I've reliably been able to not have conflicts is to give every device a static IP.


No sure what you are referring to. Where are you reading about the "Alternate Configuration" tab?

#13 bgaviator

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Posted 10 June 2013 - 07:25 PM

I've read that if you go into the TCIP/IP settings for your network connection, if you have say Dynamic set for your primary type of connection, you can enter a static IP on the Alternate Configuration page, and after a certain period of trying to connect Dynamically, Windows will switch over to the defined alternate static IP.  I'm just wondering if this is a workaround to my problem, because as long as I set a static IP in for the Windows 7 computers, they seem to work fine at that point.  Still not sure why my Windows XP don't have this problem though, but the Windows 7 computers do.  






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