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Beginner Recommendations


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22 replies to this topic

#1 Slim Nelson

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:37 PM

Hello everyone, I just recently grew interest in wanting to explore other OS's and landed on Linux. Just recently, I set my system up for dual booting and installed Ubuntu v12.04 on it, I've played around with a lot of things so far and am trying to learn as much as possible through google on it but I can't really satisfy myself with just messing around with things.

All I can ask is if anyone would recommend any inparticular things that should be checked out, any interesting tutorials, free courses, most useful terminal commands, advanced customizations, etc.. This question may sound stupid because I can just google most things and I have, but I was just wondering if any experts or even experienced Linux users had any personal recommendations as to exploring Ubunutu, or Linux in general.



All help will be greatly appreciated as always, thank you in advance.

-Slim


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#2 DarkSnake-Kobra

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 01:42 PM

Hi :)

Glad you are taking an interest in Linux! Here's some good links I'm using.

Bash

http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/index.html << The author has a pdf copy somewhere, but I forget where exactly.

http://ss64.com/bash/

http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bashref.html

List of distros

http://distrowatch.com/

The Free Software Foundation has tons of documentation and material on their GNU website gnu.org which would probably be the best place to start since they were the biggest reason Linux exists as it does now as free software.

#3 Bezukhov

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 05:54 PM

I still consider myself a n00b when it comes to Linux. If I can I will impart to you one thing that I have learned its:

 

Do not fear the terminal!!!

 

Seriously, the worst you could have to  do is to re-install whatever distro your using. And, if your here on this forum, you are clever enough to back up all that is important.


To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#4 1002 Richard S

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Posted 26 May 2013 - 11:25 PM

Linux Beginner Search Engine is useful too. (Quote) "LBSE is tailored To Search Specific Linux Sites only. You can further narrow down search by selecting any of the 16 Refinement Filters and / or Date Range Filters. LBSE Separates 'Class' from 'Mass'

Searches Wiki and Forums of Popular Ubuntu Derivatives and over 66 Popular Linux Blogs totalling over 100 sites."

http://www.google.com/cse/home?cx=017607476515012185699:b_owgx6xyi0



#5 Slim Nelson

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:15 AM

Perfect! Thank you guys! This should keep me busy for awhile!

Keep em comin!... :clapping:


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#6 1002 Richard S

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:24 AM

Just remembered this too ...

(Quote) "CLI Companion is a tool to store and run Terminal commands from a GUI. People unfamiliar with the Terminal will find CLI Companion a useful way to become acquainted with the Terminal and unlock its potential. Experienced users can use CLI Companion to store their extensive list of commands in a searchable list."

https://launchpad.net/clicompanion



#7 pane-free

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 07:42 AM

Rute User's Tutorial & Exposition

 


There comes a time in the affairs of man when he must take the bull by the tail and face the situation.
W. C. Fields

#8 Slim Nelson

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:15 PM

Thanks guys!

And damn dude, doing anything in Linux is just a mystery, I don't know how to delete anything I've installed (do I have to do these type of things through the terminal?), and I'm trying to update my flash player and don't know how to launch the installation after I download it.. lol

EDIT: And just little stuff like changing the clock I can't figure out... lol I don't know if Ubuntu is anything like your disto but I click on the clock, click "Time & Date Settings", it opens the windows, I click "Manually" which unchecks "Automatically from the internet", I change whatever needs to be changed then I don't know how to apply the changes.. lol, I need a Linux for dummies book it seems like, haha.


Edited by Slim Nelson, 27 May 2013 - 11:39 PM.

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#9 1002 Richard S

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 01:28 AM

Thanks guys!

And damn dude, doing anything in Linux is just a mystery, I don't know how to delete anything I've installed (do I have to do these type of things through the terminal?),

 

In the terminal ... sudo apt-get remove (name of package)

For instance sudo apt-get remove gimp

 

You'll be asked for your password. Don't be alarmed if you don't get a row of ********* (as I was at first!) once entered clicked the return key and the process should start. Some packages offer you a y/n option, some don't.



#10 Slim Nelson

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 07:59 AM

Thanks Rich.

And also, can I run this Adobe Flash Player installation I've been trying to run through terminal too?


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#11 1002 Richard S

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 09:13 AM

The easiest way is       sudo apt-get install ubuntu-restricted-extras      explanation and software centre method with screenshots here: http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/nonfree



#12 Slim Nelson

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 12:22 PM

Worked, thanks again Rich.

 

 

And I seriously can't thank you enough for that link Pane, lol. I'm only in Ch. 4 and it has helped me tremendously, I feel like I just graduated special linux ed class. :graduate:

I would recommend that to anyone. Very, very helpful.


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#13 DarkSnake-Kobra

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 01:49 PM

Some advice you may want to install Ubuntu in a virtual machine prior to actually installing it on a physical computer. That way you are free to do whatever you want and not risk screwing anything up. :)



#14 Slim Nelson

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 02:16 PM

Some advice you may want to install Ubuntu in a virtual machine prior to actually installing it on a physical computer. That way you are free to do whatever you want and not risk screwing anything up. :)

I used the Wubi Installer, is that still pretty safe?


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#15 DarkSnake-Kobra

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 02:57 PM

That's pretty safe. Just be careful when mounting your Windows partition not to delete or move anything important as that could break your Windows installation.






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