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china cyberspies outwit us stealing military secrets


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#1 herg62123

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 07:51 PM

www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-05-01/china-cyberspies-outwit-u-s-stealing-military-secrets.html

 

 

QinetiQ’s espionage expertise didn’t keep Chinese cyber- spies from outwitting the company. In a three-year operation, hackers linked to China’s military infiltrated QinetiQ’s computers and compromised most if not all of the company’s research. At one point, they logged into the company’s network by taking advantage of a security flaw identified months earlier and never fixed.

 

“We found traces of the intruders in many of their divisions and across most of their product lines,” said Christopher Day, until February a senior vice president for Verizon Communications Inc. (VZ)’s Terremark security division, which was hired twice by QinetiQ to investigate the break-ins. “There was virtually no place we looked where we didn’t find them.”

 

 


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#2 Romeo29

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 11:14 AM

On a radio program on NPR, a security expert said that they used spearfishing. This involves sending emails about bank accounts statements, unpaid bills, cheap viagra, hot women who are alone and waiting for you but when you click on it, you get a small program installed instead.



#3 Hunting.Targ

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 05:55 PM

Well there you go.  As in many other things,  often the difference isn't in superior technology - the difference is in superior creativity and self-discipline.  Sometimes you don't have to be better than your opponent; you just need to be clever and patient enough for them to make a mistake.


Furious activity is no substitute for understanding.

-H.H. Williams

 

In a networked world, trust is the most important currency.
    -Eric Schmidt, University of Pennsylvania Commencement Address, 2009

 


#4 Bezukhov

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 10:13 PM

Sun Tzu would have been proud.


To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#5 sh4rkbyt3

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 02:07 AM

I think in light of the Edward Snowden case, maybe this story needs to be revisited for it's accuracy?



#6 Hunting.Targ

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 08:42 PM

Apples to Oranges; there's a difference between hacking and abusing legitimate authority.


Furious activity is no substitute for understanding.

-H.H. Williams

 

In a networked world, trust is the most important currency.
    -Eric Schmidt, University of Pennsylvania Commencement Address, 2009

 


#7 sh4rkbyt3

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 01:00 AM

I'm talking about when it actually started, not about the morality of the Snowden case. In light of the fact our spying etc. started in the 50's I would be willing to bet that we had the jump on them for quite a while.



#8 Hunting.Targ

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 07:02 AM

I wasn't referring to the morality of Snowden's actions; I was referring to the morality of the PRISM program.


Furious activity is no substitute for understanding.

-H.H. Williams

 

In a networked world, trust is the most important currency.
    -Eric Schmidt, University of Pennsylvania Commencement Address, 2009

 


#9 woolie

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:36 AM

China’s Military Preparing for ‘People’s War’ in Cyberspace, Space

Translated report reveals high-tech plans for cyber attacks, anti-satellite strikes

AP

BY: Bill Gertz
July 30, 2013 5:00 am

China’s military is preparing for war in cyberspace involving space attacks on satellites and the use of both military and civilian personnel for a digital “people’s war,” according to an internal Chinese defense report.

“As cyber technology continues to develop, cyber warfare has quietly begun,” the report concludes, noting that the ability to wage cyber war in space is vital for China’s military modernization.

According to the report, strategic warfare in the past was built on nuclear weapons. “But strategic warfare in the information age is cyber warfare,” the report said.

 

This entry was posted in China, National Security and tagged China.

_http://freebeacon.com/china-military-preparing-for-peoples-war-in-cyberspace-space/


Edited by Orange Blossom, 15 November 2015 - 10:41 PM.
Edited to comply with fair use rules. ~ OB


#10 Hunting.Targ

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:24 PM

Informative, and quite startling.  I'm not a bit surprised that China has continued to view the United States as a threat; it's part of the adversarial position that Marx and his contemporaries established between workers and wealth-holders, perpetuated by state indoctrination.

 

On a tangential note, China may be approaching a dramatic shift in philosophy, due not only to the industrialization and capitalization of its economy, and the resultant prosperity of the Chinese people, but because China's efforts to control what the people see, know, and think are faltering.  I have one source that said "there are more underground Christians in China than there are members of the Communist party."  This despite systematic efforts by the Chinese government to infiltrate, intimidate, punish, and disperse religious groups of all stripes.

Now if only we in North America could straighten out our own governments, we might not be viewed as being "arrogant" and having "politics of hegemony."


Furious activity is no substitute for understanding.

-H.H. Williams

 

In a networked world, trust is the most important currency.
    -Eric Schmidt, University of Pennsylvania Commencement Address, 2009

 





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