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"IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL" blue screen w/ "STOP: 0x0000000A" code


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#1 aleksulmer

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 12:25 AM

A few days ago I was minding my own business, surfing the web, when my computer shut down on me without any warning or notification. At first I thought there was some power surge but the comp began to restart. It went into startup repair and sat there for 30 minutes before notifying me that "the problem could not be solved." Half of the time I turn on the comp, it says that it has shut down incorrectly and whether or not to go into safe mode or start Windows normally. The other half of the time, the computer immediately goes into startup repair and sits there for a half hour before giving me the same "could not fix the problem" message. If I start Windows normally, 3 different things can happen:
1. Stays on the "Welcome" screen for a while, then screen goes black, then blue screen pops up followed by an immediate restart
2. Loads the desktop normally, and after 2 minutes immediately goes to blue screen + restart, without warning
3. Loads the desktop normally, and all seems to be normal but comp refuses to sleep, hibernate, or shut down (this has only happened once so far)

After much research into this I discovered there was a hotfix for a problem that seems to describe mine almost perfectly (based on the exact same blue screen codes "IRQL ..." and "STOP: ...") But other sources say there are other possibilities such as anti-virus programs, updates, or device drivers that can cause the problem, as well as hard drive failure and other nasty scenarios.... I have no idea how to pinpoint what is causing the problem. I have already attempted 2 things based on my researching:
1. System restore to two weeks ago (to see if a recent update was the problem)
2. Going through all the services (via Safe Mode) and enabling them one at a time, followed by restarting, to find out if one of the services was the issue. Nothing I have been doing has helped. The issue persists.

Other info:
1. Two weeks before this all occurred, I somehow got the FBI MoneyPak virus. I removed it by using command prompt in safe mode to create a new user (as administrator) and ran Malwarebytes to clear everything out. Afterwards I just deleted the user I created.
2. A week before this all occurred, I found a few malware trojans that were hijacking my browser. I have used Malwarebytes in the past with great success and so this time was no different. I removed all the infections via Malwarebytes and my browser problems were solved.
3. I am currently not running any anti-virus program.

Like I said, I found a hotfix on the Microsoft support site but am hesitant since it hasn't undergone much testing. I don't want to risk any potential hardware/software damage from using it. How do I pinpoint where the problem is coming from? I use my comp every day and basically am forced to use it in safe mode, which is extremely inconvenient. I continue to try to research the forums but the more I research, the more information I find out. This makes everything overwhelming for me. I have considered buying an external hard drive, transferring all my files (documents, pics, videos, music is basically my most important stuff) and reinstalling Windows 7 completely. But that seems like a lazy way to do it. If this can be fixed in some other way, help is much appreciated.

Also, if there is any other info needed about my system, let me know.
Thanks in advance!


Edited by hamluis, 11 May 2013 - 09:54 AM.
Moved from Win 7 to Am I Infected - Hamluis.


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#2 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 09 May 2013 - 01:00 AM

Hi

 

Based on the problem description you written, i suspect a Root kit issue. FBI money pack is known to install rootkits in the system.  This types of infections should be removed under the supervision of a trained malware helper. Post a malware removal request in the Malware section.

 

Follow the instructions in the below link :

 

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/34773/preparation-guide-for-use-before-using-malware-removal-tools-and-requesting-help/

 

Typical cause of this BSOD are a faulty driver, service or Memory corruption. Rootkits are known to install their driver and service in to the system. So the first step is to make sure the system is malware free.

 

Any troubleshooting step without confirming the system is malware free is pointless.


Edited by Anshad Edavana, 09 May 2013 - 03:23 AM.


#3 aleksulmer

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 01:25 PM

Thanks so much for the advice. Why did it take a while for the rootkit to manifest itself into this problem? I didn't start getting Blue Screens until almost 2 weeks after I removed the actual virus...



#4 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 01:50 PM

Hi

 

I can't definitely say it is a Rootkit issue. There are several causes for BSOD and it is the most hardest thing to troubleshoot. Like what i said earlier,Rootkits are  very hard to detect. There are some Rootkit like "Stuxnet" which is only discovered after several years after it's creation. Some rootkits hide in the boot sector of the system and infect when the time comes.

 

Before jumping to repair Windows, it will be always good to check the system for malware issues. Since you had a dangerous infection  just about 2 weeks ago, making sure no remnants of the malware is still in the system is necessary

 

.http://www.bullguard.com/bullguard-security-center/pc-security/computer-threats/what-is-a-rootkit.aspx

 

http://safeandsavvy.f-secure.com/2010/11/30/why-removing-rootkits-is-such-a-pain/

 

Once the malware helpers in the BC team certify your system as clean, we are good to go.


Edited by Anshad Edavana, 11 May 2013 - 05:21 AM.





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