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Checking File System on C always on start up - why?


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#1 zzzz

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 10:34 AM

When I start up I always  (for the past year or so) get that message which if I let run can take some time. It never comes up with any problems. 
 
I can always stop it within 10 secs. by pressing any key, if I am there to do it I know, but why is this happening when it doesn't on my other computers which have identical set ups?
 
Thanks for any advice or solution to stop this.


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#2 anyrepli

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 11:06 AM

Sounds like you might have a "dirty drive bit" set and for some unknow reason, it is not resetting after a completed scan on startup. Now, I am not aware of any common procedure to "easily" deal with this issue but I can tell you how to determine if your dirty bit is set and how you might want to try and resolve your issue so here goes:

 

Open up an elevated run command prompt (run as admin) and type fsutil dirty query C: (return)

If the query response is C: is dirty, then that is the cause

If the query response is C: is not dirty, then maybe you had a USB drive plugged when an error occurred and it is still (looking to) check all drives on boot, and since the other drive is not there, it can't run the scan and can't clear the dirty bit (my best guess). So, try booting with that other drive active and see if it scans it and removes the dirty bit.

 

Anyway, it is possible that the dirty bit is stuck on your C: drive (for reasons unknown) and, if so, I will point you to a link that claims you can fix it but this would be a do at your own risk because I can't vouch for it: http://www.raymond.cc/blog/manually-reset-or-clear-dirty-bit-in-windows-without-chkdsk/2/

 

Good luck.


Edited by anyrepli, 28 April 2013 - 11:14 AM.


#3 anyrepli

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 11:09 AM

OOPS: I can't believe I didn't check your OS before making the above recommendation and I have no idea if that will work on XP but it won't hurt to at least give the command a try. Sorry about that!


Edited by anyrepli, 28 April 2013 - 11:10 AM.


#4 hamluis

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 11:16 AM

Well...the chkdsk originating at startup...does so because it detects file system problems on your hard drive.

 

Stopping it...is, IMO, a very bad idea because it prevents any possible remedy that might have been attempted.

 

Typically, when chkdsk originates on its own at startup...best thing to do is let it run.  Once the system has booted into Windows, initiat the chkdsk /r command.

 

Start/Run...type chkdsk /r and hit Enter.  Type Y in new screen and hit Enter.  Reboot.  The command will execute...upon completion, the system will boot into Windows.

 

The chkdsk /r command results in a more comprehensive, beneficial scan of the Windows file system, whereas the auto chkdsk is not as complete.

 

Louis



#5 zzzz

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 11:17 AM

Thank you for your response.

 

I don't know what an 'elevated'run command is. I typed fsutil dirty query C: into the normal 'Run' and clicking OK I got the usual black screen with nothing on it which disappeared in a fraction of a second. There was no 'file not recognised'  type message so my method is obviously wrong. Could you be more descriptive of your instructions - thanks.



#6 zzzz

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 11:18 AM

Thank you for your response.

 

I don't know what an 'elevated'run command is. I typed fsutil dirty query C: into the normal 'Run' and clicking OK I got the usual black screen with nothing on it which disappeared in a fraction of a second. There was no 'file not recognised'  type message so my method is obviously wrong. Could you be more descriptive of your instructions - thanks.

Just got your message about my OS - yes it's XP so that's why no result!



#7 zzzz

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 11:22 AM

hamluis - thanks for that - I'll follow up that procedure next time.



#8 anyrepli

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 11:31 AM

Well...the chkdsk originating at startup...does so because it detects file system problems on your hard drive.

 

Stopping it...is, IMO, a very bad idea because it prevents any possible remedy that might have been attempted.

 

Typically, when chkdsk originates on its own at startup...best thing to do is let it run.  Once the system has booted into Windows, initiat the chkdsk /r command.

 

Start/Run...type chkdsk /r and hit Enter.  Type Y in new screen and hit Enter.  Reboot.  The command will execute...upon completion, the system will boot into Windows.

 

The chkdsk /r command results in a more comprehensive, beneficial scan of the Windows file system, whereas the auto chkdsk is not as complete.

 

Louis

The OP has already stated that it has run to completion many times over the past year



#9 zzzz

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 12:21 PM

I've done the re checking - it took much longer than usual 'cos of the more thorough checking  - half hour for the used 29GB and 15 mins for the 43GB free space and re started OK.

 

I'll see how it goes on future starts and confirm in a few days.

 

anyrepli's comment is right but I never did this more thorough method which will, I hope, fix this glitch.

 

Thanks to all responders.



#10 zzzz

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:01 AM

Switching on just now started with that Checking - oh dear!
 
Two clues perhaps:-
 
My CMOS battery is dead (for more time than this glitch, I think) so I must 'Adjust Date & Time'each time. Also I seem always to get the message, 'Chrome did not close properly do you want to restore...'.
 
Would these have anything of relevance? 


#11 hamluis

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 09:28 AM

Please...replace the CMOS battery with a new one.

 

Louis



#12 Firefoxthebomb

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 10:27 AM

Could be a sign of a failing hard drive, do you happen to know the manufacture of your hard drive?

 

You should run a hard drive diagnostics on that drive using the manufactures tool to ensure its not failing.


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#13 zzzz

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 12:20 PM

Louis - others have also said I should replace that CMOS battery but what's the problem not doing so? I appreciate your advice but I have run my machine 2 - 3 years without it without problems and being 74 years old I don't like to spend my shortening time doing unnecessary things when I could be getting on trying to get thru my reading list of 200 plus books! (before I go blind too!) Actually I have 3 or 4 of those batteries in my battery drawer! OK I am very naughty.
 
A bit odd Louis - your photo looks pretty much like me  although my hair is white! (Not from computer stress I may add)
 
 
I did a dirty check on C: - it came up ..'NOT dirty'
 
I have checked my HD - it says it is healthy (S.M.A.R.T)
 
Further goings on:
 
I had Panda free AV which after a few minutes after every start up would turn off and wouldn't restart even after reboots (as advised by them) and just relied on MS Essentials. So I uninstalled it and installed Windows Defender.
 
I turned off the computer for 3 hours and turning it back on it booted normally without the File Checking. Whether those actions have solved this glitch only time will tell - seems rather a coincidence to me but who knows?
 
Will update here on future  start ups. (Later tonight if possible)
 
Thanks for your attention on this matter, very helpful.

Edited by zzzz, 29 April 2013 - 12:23 PM.


#14 hamluis

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 02:09 PM

The CMOS battery...controls Windows ability...rather, system ability...to properly recognize hardware on the system.

 

Some indocations of a failing battery include varied and unwarranted error messages about various hardware components.  These "false errors" tend to create more unnecessary frustration for any user who elects to not replace the battery or whi may be trying to troubleshoot "issues" with the system.

 

Generally speaking...you can assume that when any computer system component is failing...it is not very smart to just ignore it if system functionality is desired.

 

Louis



#15 zzzz

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 05:35 PM

Yes you're right, I should attend to it nut not having any problems for so many years I assumed it was not necessary.

 

The restart now opened as it should but without the initial Phoenix BIOS page to allow options (I don't use that anyway).

 

Someone said that running Panda and MSE could possibly cause instability and as all seems OK now that I have got rid of Panda it could be right but that has not seemingly affected my other computers.

 

Let's hope that this glitch is in the past now. I appreciate your help on this .






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