Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

How best to add an SSD to my PC


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Stephen W

Stephen W

  • Members
  • 210 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwich, UK
  • Local time:05:00 AM

Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:07 AM

Hi. I have a PC thats about 4 or 5 years old and I am really quite happy with how it runs. But I saw a good deal on an SSD recently and have ordered one.

I currently have an Asus M4A79T Deluxe Motherboard and 2 pairs of Hard disks set up in software RAID 1 Mirroring. So I have the OS and programs installed on the first pair of 150GB WD Velociraptor drives being C:\ and a second pair of 500GB drive as my D:\ for Data storage.

I believe that my Motherboard has 5 SATA connections so I do not believe there is a spare (though I am yet to physically check) as I think the 5th port will be used by the DVD drive.

When my new SSD arrives I want to do a fresh install of Windows 7 as I have been unable for 2 years to get SP1 to install on my machine. I get the common 80004005 EFAIL message when trying to install SP1 and none of the potential solutions I have found have fixed it.

So my question is, can anybody advise me on the safest/best way to change the set up on my machine when I fit the new drive. It would be nice to have the option to go back to my old C: disks if necessary. Dual boot could be an option. But I am also concerned that I will have to disconnect 1 of the drives and therefore break the RAID set up and I am not sure if that may potentially destroy my existing OS.

Also, what may be relevant, is that I recently installed DriveImage XML on my system and backed up my C:\ to an external USB drive that I keep connected to the PC.

Hopefully thats enough info for somebody to give me some advice on the best process to follow, but please ask if you have any questions.

Thanks

Steve



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 210 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwich, UK
  • Local time:05:00 AM

Posted 23 April 2013 - 01:25 PM

Nobody can help? I'm starting to think the easiest thing will be to image my old drive onto the new one. Is SP1 all that important anyway? I'm still not sure of the safest way to decontruct my RAID array without risking being unable to boot into the old drives should the restore onto the new drive fail in some way. Will I be OK just with the single partition on the new drive or should I have some unassigned partition space for updates to use?



#3 GreenGiant117

GreenGiant117

  • Members
  • 294 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:12:00 AM

Posted 23 April 2013 - 02:15 PM

The good thing about mirror raiding is that if one of the drives fails (or is removed) you still have the other able to run the same thing, you may have to change some Raid settings in order to get it to work right but if need be removing one of the hard drives should be fine. As far as deconstructing your raid goes it should be as easy as just shutting off the raid settings.

 

As far as creating an image of your current OS I would not do that, do a clean installation from a disc, there are settings and things that you will want to change, and you want to keep the amount of data on the SSD to a minimum so clean installation is preferable.

 

Single partition should be fine, I have a 128GB SSD, one partition, with the OS and a couple programs, other than that everything is on my secondary drive (programs, files, etc). You will want the latest updates to windows (I think SP1 added some better scoring for SSD's, not that its a huge issue, but it has better security anyways) There are also many MANY settings to change on the computer to optimize the SSD, make sure you look up a few tutorials for that.



#4 Stephen W

Stephen W
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 210 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwich, UK
  • Local time:05:00 AM

Posted 23 April 2013 - 02:47 PM

Hi. Thanks for the reply. The reason I am a bit twitchy about the RAID is that in the past my C:\ array has 'fallen apart' for no apparent reason, and I've has to change BIOS settings to boot from the single drive that has not been corrupted, and then rebuild the array from within windows using AMD RAIDXpert. It makes me nervous when that happens cos sometimes I'm unsure whether its going to work again! Its not happened for quite a while though.

I did also wonder if I might be able to just replace one of the disks in my RAID array with the new one, rebuild after booting to the old disk, then shut down and disconnect the old disk and boot to the new disk. In principal that sounds pretty easy but I dunno if I may get problems.

I've been debating going for the clean install and I'm somewhat loathe to do it as it will take so long to reinstall programs and get everything as I like it. There is also the risk of losing stuff that I've forgotten about. You really think thats what I should do?



#5 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 55,416 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:11:00 PM

Posted 06 May 2013 - 12:23 PM

Well...just my  opinions....

 

I don't really see any benefit in using a RAID to backup...if you are going to double your risks for failure by separating Windows and installed programs.  IMO, the RAID would be more effective if only two disks were involved, rather than 4 disks reflecting Windows and programs.

 

The fact that you make backups in addition to the RAID...is redundant.  That's not necessarily a bad thing, but I would guess that backup software is more reliable these days than any RAID 1 setup could be expected to be.

 

As for the SSD...I would just install Windows and programs on it...and use any/all of those hard drives for data storage, to include backups made routinely and periodically.  That would provide better utilization of your hard drive space...and give you the protection you desire in case of any system problems.

 

But...that's just the way that I look at things :).

 

Louis






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users