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need laptop to run faster, should i go with SSD or memory?


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#1 william10

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 10:49 PM

Hello. I have an much older HP Pavilion DV2000 with an 60GB hard drive and 1GB memory. As much as I want a faster computer, I refuse to buy a new one, I am comfortable with this one, it runs well just can use some speed. With that being said, I am considering either a SSD upgrade or adding memory (need some help here). Regarding the SSD, I am looking at:

 

Hewlett-Packard HP 431333-001 - 64GB SATA 2.5" Solid State Drive SSD

 

It's genuine HP, new drive and in my budget. I am not concerned with the capacity, I already have 60GB and don't need anything more. My question is in regards to speed, will the machine benefit more from this drive or adding memory? If memory, how much memory can I add for the same price of that hard drive? Thanks!!!



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#2 Jamebonds1

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 11:40 PM

RAM wouldn't help to make your laptop more fastest, neither SSD.  But SSD will lasting forever than Hard Drive and fastest load and write time.  I would take look at newegg.com for good price 128 GB SSD.  

 

Please take time to take look at this.  http://bizsupport2.austin.hp.com/bc/docs/support/SupportManual/c00835681/c00835681.pdf  There will be adapler on SATA HD that you need to remove it first.  



#3 killerx525

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 01:18 AM

The 64GB SSD from HP isn't worth it at all. For an extra $10, you could get a larger, faster and reliable SSD from Samsung at Tiger Direct. Depending on the OS you are currently using, a memory upgrade can make a day and night difference especially if your using Windows Vista or 7.


Edited by killerx525, 18 April 2013 - 01:18 AM.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#4 Jamebonds1

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 12:00 PM

As well as there are another great price for SSD.  http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227942&IsVirtualParent=1



#5 hamluis

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 11:41 AM

FWIW:

 

That OCZ drive linked to...is a refurb, with a 180-day warranty.

 

It's been tested to ensure compliance with original manufacturer specifications, and MAY include a limited manufacturer warranty - see the item's product page for details.  Typical new SSDs carry a 3-year warranty.

 

IMO, warranties are important when dealing with any SSD or hard drive, since failure rates rank high when compared to those of all other system components, with the possiblle exception of PSUs.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 26 April 2013 - 06:11 PM.
Edited for clarity - Hamluis.


#6 Jamebonds1

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 07:40 PM

FWIW:

 

That OCZ drive linked to...is a refurb, with a 180-day warranty.

 

een tested to ensure compliance with original manufacturer specifications, and MAY include a limited manufacturer warranty - see the item's product page for deTypical new SSDs carry a 3-year warranty.

 

IMO, warranties are important when dealing with any SSD or hard drive, since failure rates rank high when compared to those of all other system components, with the possiblle exception of PSUs.

 

Louis

I don't mean being rude but maybe I ask what does detypical mean?  



#7 anyrepli

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Posted 22 April 2013 - 07:38 AM

If you do decide to buy an SSD you might get a slight boost in speed. As an example, I had an older desktop (with a SATA I hard drive) and my benchmarked speeds were approximately 45MB/s for both read and write; however, when I upgraded to an SSD, my benchmarks improved to 139MB/s read and 70MB/s write. The difference was noticeable. Also, I really think that a minimum of 2GBs of RAM would serve you well.



#8 hamluis

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 06:13 PM

 

FWIW:

 

That OCZ drive linked to...is a refurb, with a 180-day warranty.

 

een tested to ensure compliance with original manufacturer specifications, and MAY include a limited manufacturer warranty - see the item's product page for deTypical new SSDs carry a 3-year warranty.

 

IMO, warranties are important when dealing with any SSD or hard drive, since failure rates rank high when compared to those of all other system components, with the possiblle exception of PSUs.

 

Louis

I don't mean being rude but maybe I ask what does detypical mean?  

 

 

 

Thanks very much for bringing that post to my attention.  Sometimes I get very careless and fail to ensure that I've typed what I intended to type, my apologies to all who tried to make sense of that.  I have edited now :).

 

Louis



#9 Jamebonds1

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 07:44 PM

 

 

FWIW:

 

That OCZ drive linked to...is a refurb, with a 180-day warranty.

 

een tested to ensure compliance with original manufacturer specifications, and MAY include a limited manufacturer warranty - see the item's product page for deTypical new SSDs carry a 3-year warranty.

 

IMO, warranties are important when dealing with any SSD or hard drive, since failure rates rank high when compared to those of all other system components, with the possiblle exception of PSUs.

 

Louis

I don't mean being rude but maybe I ask what does detypical mean?  

 

 

 

Thanks very much for bringing that post to my attention.  Sometimes I get very careless and fail to ensure that I've typed what I intended to type, my apologies to all who tried to make sense of that.  I have edited now :).

 

Louis

 

No problem :)  I made bad lucky with grammer and autocorrect too :D



#10 jonstonx64

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 08:58 PM

I would go with more RAM. The amount of RAM you can put in it depends on the OS and OS edition. Generally, any OS will take up to 8GB especially if its a 64bit OS. Anymore than 8GB for just general use is overkill, but more RAM would definitely speed you up. I cannot imagine life with any less that 4GB. I believe your computer has DDR2 memory too so keep that in mind if you upgrade your RAM, specifically SODIMM DDR2. It cannot use DDR3, as all new computers come with now. SSD is a good choice as well but 4GB of RAM is more economical.

Here is some good RAM to look at. I always go with Cosair or Kingston - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145598



#11 hamluis

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 12:45 PM

I don't believe there should be any doubt...increasing the RAM to max supported seems to me like the only way to go.

 

Most of us with SSDs...use those as boot drives for O/Ses and programs.  Not sure what the speed increase is, but it's likely not to be noticed unless you are timing the boot process.

 

RAM, OTOH, will ease the routine processing burden within Windows, in every way.

 

http://www.crucial.com/upgrade/HP-memory/Pavilion+DV2000+Series/Pavilion+dv2000+Series-upgrades.html

 

Louis



#12 rotor123

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Posted 07 May 2013 - 09:02 PM

Hi,

For what its worth, I took a single core laptop running Windows 7 that I paid a whopping $329 for back when Windows 7 was the latest Windows. I bought it to learn windows 7 on. Later On I decided it was too slow starting windows, and loading programs.

 

I switched it to a Intel 320 Series SSD and it went from being dog slow to usable. I still use it to do my Online Bill paying, Banking, and Shopping. And that is all it is used for. It still looks like new, Runs much better than new and I hope to get several more years out of it. I went with the Intel when they upgraded the warranty on it to 5 years. At the moment the only computer without a SSD boot drive is because it is still under warranty.

 

Good Luck

Roger


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#13 freeknasty

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 09:50 AM

I would go with the 4 GiGs of ram even though if 32 xp it will only use 3 gigs max.

Also insteed of solid state pick up a hybrid drive. they seem to be more reliable

keep in mind the solid state drive have a limited amount of read/writes.



#14 rotor123

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Posted 10 May 2013 - 08:05 PM

Hi Freeknasty,

 

I've been running a Intel 320 Series since June 2011 when they upped the warranty to 5 years.

 

Knock Wood, It has been Solid, Fast and reliable, They all have for me (4). With no moving parts I expect it to outlast regular and Hybrid hard drives. The Intel SSD Toolbox shows Life at 100% and health as good.

 

I did make sure to get Intel SSDs (Four) when i went that route for their reliability.

 

Not to mention that unlike spinning drives the transfer rates and access times remain flat no matter where on the drive the data is.

On a spinning drive the data transfer rate varies depending where the data is stored and they can get fragmented too.

 

Cheers

Roger


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