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Multiple location access points


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#1 hispaladin

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 09:40 AM

My company has about 12 locations all with WIFI for the company employees (it is secured with WPA2).  What I want to do is set all the access points with the same SSID and PW so that when a employee moves from one location to the next they will not have to have 12 profiles in their systems.  If I set the SSID and PW the same on all of our locations will the computers pick up the new location using the last locations ID and PW?  We are using sonicwall tz100 routers to provide VPN access to our main office.



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#2 chrisd87

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 07:56 AM

All stations and APs on a given wireless network must have the same network name to ensure that they can communicate.

 

You set the ESSID of the remote location(s) using either a unique name
or by using the same ESSID as you use for your main base station.You associate with one AP one time and then your PC or Mac can associate with any AP on your WDS network without you
having to do anything — it’s more seamless this way. But remember, you don’t have to do this — you can give each AP a unique ESSID and just configure your computer to associate with them according to your preference.

Make sure you turn off any routing or DHCP functionality in the remote
repeater stations. All of this functionality should be performed in the
main base station or the network’s main router.


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#3 hispaladin

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 02:45 PM

Well the situation is that the remote locations are in different towns, many miles away.  They are not in the same network at all, so they will be handing out different IP addresses and all.  What I am hoping to achieve is a setup where the employees who go from location to location don't have to setup a new connection profile for each location. 



#4 Sneakycyber

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 07:42 PM

I don't see why it wouldn't work, I do see potential complications. Are all the access points the same make, model, encryption? Is the entire company on the same domain network, using the sonicwalls as Network Bridges?


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#5 chrisd87

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 08:05 PM

I don't see why it wouldn't work either as long as all the aps have the same essid and security settings. Just make sure to set  up the other router in bridge mode. Alternately the bridge can be set up as an access point – client relationship which requires the wireless devices used for the bridge to be set to the same SSID, Radio Channel, and Security Settings. Also like Sneaky said make sure that all of your aps are from the same manufacturer.


Edited by chrisd87, 19 April 2013 - 09:16 PM.

"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#6 hispaladin

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 09:13 AM

I don't see why it wouldn't work, I do see potential complications. Are all the access points the same make, model, encryption? Is the entire company on the same domain network, using the sonicwalls as Network Bridges?

No the location routers are not part of the domain, but they do have a VPN connection to the domain network.  Yes all the access points (for the most part, I have one location that has another make for wireless but I can accept that it will give me fits) are the same make and model and I am setting them all with the same encryption.  

 

I don't see why it wouldn't work either as long as all the aps have the same essid and security settings. Just make sure to set  up the other router in bridge mode. Alternately the bridge can be set up as an access point – client relationship which requires the wireless devices used for the bridge to be set to the same SSID, Radio Channel, and Security Settings. Also like Sneaky said make sure that all of your aps are from the same manufacturer.

maybe I am just a little slow on the networking side but how would I set a router to bridge mode when it is not connected to another router directly?  The only connection between the networks is a VPN which requires that they have different subnets so bridging wouldnt work anyway(that I understand).  Not sure how to bridge two routers that are 30 miles apart and have no connection other than through the internet.



#7 chrisd87

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Posted 23 April 2013 - 10:24 AM

What router(s) are you using for this? Are they the same routers that you posted in the first post?

 

If your router supports it, you can use GRE with router using BVI - bridge virtual interface.

 

Also, on the Sonicwall you VPN to, you need to create an address object for the remote subnet, and then under  the VPN add that as an allowed network the VPN user can access.

 

What you want is for both subnets to route through the VPN. Usually you can change this in the VPN client software (remote networks is the common term). Alternatively you can add a route that will tell your computer to use the VPN for both remote networks.

route add 192.168.1.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.25

So now all traffic destined for 192.168.1.1-255 will be sent through the VPN rather than out to the internet. So it should hit your router at site B and then be sent through your site-to-site VPN to site A.


Edited by chrisd87, 23 April 2013 - 10:49 AM.

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#8 hispaladin

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 08:49 AM

The VPN tunnels all work fine as I can administer all the routers from my office at the main office by using their local IP addresses and hit them without issue and the local machines on the other end can access the server shares without issue also.  I am a little confused as to how setting up the VPN to route traffic correctly has anything to do with the issue of accessing the wireless networks with a single profile though.  The VPN connections all work flawlessly (more or less :whistle:) and the wireless clients do not need to authenticate to the domain through the local VPN as any of them who would need have global VPN capabilities.  I am just talking about wifi access.

P.S. all the machines that have a need for local VPN access are either hardwired to the network or never leave the location so they dont need to be able to pick up a new locations wifi access

Edited by hispaladin, 24 April 2013 - 08:50 AM.


#9 chrisd87

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 07:37 PM

I replied to the message about:

 

maybe I am just a little slow on the networking side but how would I set a router to bridge mode when it is not connected to another router directly?  The only connection between the networks is a VPN which requires that they have different subnets so bridging wouldnt work anyway(that I understand).  Not sure how to bridge two routers that are 30 miles apart and have no connection other than through the internet.

 

 


As far as seamless roaming goes, unless you have access points strong enough to distribute a seamless connection between the 2 offices, your not going to get the same ip address unless you hard code the ip address on the computers.As long as the both offices are on the same subnet, then try to set the ip address to static assigned, and see if that will work? If that doesn't work, then honestly I don't know what else to tell you to try.


Edited by chrisd87, 24 April 2013 - 07:38 PM.

"Like car accidents, most hardware problems are due to driver ɹoɹɹǝ."

 


#10 hispaladin

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Posted 24 April 2013 - 08:53 PM

Sorry chrisd87 I guess I lost track of my own questions.  I am not really concerned about the clients retaining the same IP just that they can access the internet.  The networks to not run on the same subnets, they have subnets in sequence (ie 192.168.1.0. 192.168.2.0 ect...)  We have had good luck with changing routers and using the same SSID and passkey and clients pick back up on the network without any issues.  I will be sure to post back here when I get to put it to the test.



#11 chrisd87

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Posted 25 April 2013 - 08:13 AM

Alright sounds good, I'll be here.


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