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129.103.10.0/24 subnet


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#1 NpaMA

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 03:19 PM

I recently started a new job at a local business doing their IT work - website, networking, system admin, etc.

 

At this place, the network is using DHCP with a 129.103.10.0/24 subnet. With the internal gateway being 129.103.10.254, and DHCP being .0 - .200 (200s are all static IPs assigned to printers, cameras, etc.)

 

They are running NAT behind a Charter cable connection. Nothing fancy or high-end there, but the 192.103.10.0 subnet has me a bit confused. As far as I know, this is not a valid private IP range? Any reason they would be running this range?

 

I have confirmed that there is no VPN in use. A lookup of the subnet comes back to RIPE...We are located in Tennessee.

 

Any idea why the original guy set this up with a non-standard subnet instead of say, 192.168.2.0/24?

 

 



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#2 Sneakycyber

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 07:39 PM

The only reason I can think of is 1. He didn't know how to subnet. 2. There is a wireless component and he was avoiding interference ( You can still do that with Valid IP Ranges)


Chad Mockensturm 

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Certified CompTia Network +, A +





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