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Can I check dependencies somehow?


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#1 bigalexe

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 08:51 AM

This is a dual question so you can answer specifically or generally. I'd love a general answer but am willing to settle for specifics right now.

Some time ago I installed Visual Studio 2010 and have since removed it when my student license ran out (it was the massive premium version). So now I still have a bunch of "Microsoft Visual Studio *****" something or others that are left. The problem is though that I know some of these aren't from the MVS installer. For example I have Solidworks installed and when that goes in it will install some Visual Studio API tools. The same goes for the C++ packagaes as well.

So now I've got a bunch of very similar stuff that is a mix of critical and non-critical. So in Windows is there a way to check dependencies from the bottom up (Select a program... What depends on this?) so I can figure out what I can and cannot remove without breaking anything? I'm on a hard drive space crusade here and this is about the last thing in my way.


AMD Phenom II X6 2.8ghz
8GB DDR3 RAM
XFX ATI Radeon HD6850 1 GB DDR5, 26" Widescreen HDMI
500GB + 80GB HDD
Windows 7 Pro, Mozilla Firefox, AutoCAD 2011, Solidworks 2009
1/19/2012

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 02:49 PM

FWIW:  IMO, when a program installs a group of files for successful running of the program...it looks in that particular location when it is ready to call upon that file.  If said file is not in the location expected...then I suppose that the program may not function properly.

 

One of the fallacies with users assuming that deletion of "duplicate files" called by programs...is desireable.

 

AFAIK...the only way to check such would be to delete questionable files...being prepared to reinstall the given application if such deletion breaks the program.

 

Someone else here may have a better answer.

 

Louis



#3 Platypus

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 05:41 PM

Have you tried Dependency Walker?

 

http://www.dependencywalker.com/


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#4 bigalexe

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 09:59 PM

In response to Hamilus:

What exactly I have is the problem that I am running out of hard drive space. In order to do that I want to uninstall programs I'm not using. Now in the past I've installed and removed a number of programming IDE's. When I installed the IDE's I never documented changes in the system. Now I know for a fact some of them (mostly visual studio as mentioned in the OP) installed more than just the IDE. In addition to that though I have a few different CAD packages and Microsoft Office. Some of the programming API stuff that comes with these have of course similar names to stuff that might have come with the IDE's. I'm trying to figure out from BOTTOM-UP what each installed program relates to.

Example of what I'd like using a theoretical audio codec program...

-Let me click on "Awesome_Universal_MP3_Decoder_Program.exe"

-Tell me that "Awesome_Universal_MP3_Decoder_Program.exe" is called by Windows Media Player, iTunes, and VLC Player.

The problem I'm having is that it seems all the programs I can find have a top-down approach. A top down-approach has you click on iTunes.exe and it will tell you that iTunes.exe is dependent on... Quicktime_Player.exe, Annoying_iPod_Service.exe, AAC_Decoder.exe, Safari_Propaganda_Machine.exe and so on. The problem with top-down is I'd have to copy all the dependencies listed for every program I want to work (a massive list) into a database in order to cross-reference that list with my installed programs. That's tons of work.

 

I hope this makes sense guys. Sorry if this is confusing.


AMD Phenom II X6 2.8ghz
8GB DDR3 RAM
XFX ATI Radeon HD6850 1 GB DDR5, 26" Widescreen HDMI
500GB + 80GB HDD
Windows 7 Pro, Mozilla Firefox, AutoCAD 2011, Solidworks 2009
1/19/2012




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