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How to reset Internet connection in Linux


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#1 villandra

villandra

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 09:31 PM

My housemate has Linux. Today I unplugged his ethernet cable from the household router and plugged it directly into the modem, before shutting down all other computer equipment and leaving the house for the day. Severe storms were expected. The cable company owns the modem and readily replaces it, but I own the router.

My housemate promptly lost his internet connection for the day. His connection was restored when I plugged his cable back into the router, connected the router to the modem, and booted up the router.

I've done the same thing before and he did not lose his internet connection. I don't know if I rebooted the modem. It's the only thing that would have happened different.

Whenever I unplug my Windows computer from the router and connect the ethernet cable directly to the modem, the internet connection won't work until I enter the Netshell command in a command prompt window.   The Windows Netshell command resets the TCP stack, in Windows.  It is unclear whether Roadrunner ISP deliberately corrupts your TCP/ IP stack to prevent connecting computers to their network, or the router does that, though I've had the problem with more than one brand of router.

Is there a similar procedure for Linux?

I've searched on the Internet, and found theoretical, convoluted and seemingly nonresponsive, answers that pertain to something different, and answers that pertain to some different operating system like Ubantu. I've seen advanced discussions about what some OTHER procedure is.

The only thing that will make sense to me is the simple command or commands to reset TCP in Linux.

The solution must NOT reset all of my housemate's OTHER computer settings or whatever to their default whatever. ONLY the Internet connection.

Thank you.

 

Dora

 


 



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#2 Naught McNoone

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 11:43 AM

. . .  I unplug my Windows computer from the router and connect . . . . directly to the modem . . . . ISP deliberately corrupts your TCP/ IP . . . .


. . . . . a similar procedure for Linux?

. . . . simple command . . .

 

Dora,

 

What appears to happen may be this.

 

Your router is controling all your local traffic.  It assigns local IP addressed on your network.  Your local address would be something similar to 192.168.0.100

 

When you connect directly to the ISP through the modem, you have to reset your address to the one assigned by the ISP through the modem.

 

In Windows this can be done several ways.  From the command prompt you can use "ipconfig /renew"

 

In Linux, the console command is "ifconfig".  Try this in Linux "ifconfig --help" or "man ifconfig".  One calls the command line options using help, the other calls up the manual for the ifconfig command.

 

A simple reset can be done using "ifconfig down" followed by "ifconfig up".  This will disconnect your network card and reconnect it again.

 

Most distributions also add a simple network utility to the desktop when they install KDE, Gnome, xfe, etc.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Cheers!

 

Naught


Edited by Naught McNoone, 02 April 2013 - 12:00 PM.





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