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should i buy 10.000 rpm 32 MB for my old MB ??


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#1 maze seven

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 10:55 PM

hi, i'm new to this forum. i'm going to purchase new hdd. 10000 rpm, 32 MB western digital for details. but my motherboard is kinda old. my question is : does motherboard just support for certain rpm or MB only ? because in my mobo's manual there are no any details about hdd specs to support ( http://vfiles.cizgi.com.tr/cizgi/pms_dosya/132/p5gcmx1333_en.pdf ) thanx for help

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#2 Uncle Rim

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 01:34 AM

The motherboard does not care about the rotational speed of the hard drive. The higher speed reduces seek time and can make your computer respond a tiny bit faster.

 

The capacity of the drive may be more of a concern depending on your operating system. For example Windows XP (32 bit) is limited to seeing 2 terabytes. Older operating systems have even greater limits.



#3 Platypus

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 07:49 AM

Are you referring to an old 34GB Raptor? They were a noisy, hot-running drive with a high failure rate - I'd be surprised if any of them were still running!


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#4 maze seven

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 03:53 PM

Are you referring to an old 34GB Raptor? They were a noisy, hot-running drive with a high failure rate - I'd be surprised if any of them were still running!

no.. 32 MB refer to cache size. what files can i put in such 34 GB hdd?? lol..

 

The motherboard does not care about the rotational speed of the hard drive. The higher speed reduces seek time and can make your computer respond a tiny bit faster.

 

The capacity of the drive may be more of a concern depending on your operating system. For example Windows XP (32 bit) is limited to seeing 2 terabytes. Older operating systems have even greater limits.

thanx. i dont much about hdd. your answer is helpful.



#5 Platypus

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 05:52 PM

At a pinch you can use a 34GB drive as a system drive, I have Win8 on a 30GB SSD. However as Uncle Rim says, aspects of the internal operation of a drive, like rotation speed and cache size are transparent to anything outside the drive, so don't affect other hardware or software.

 

As long as the mainboard and OS implement 48-bit LBA, and so can use drives larger than 137GB, you should be OK up to a total capacity of 2TB, and with some work-arounds, beyond:

 

http://www.pcworld.com/article/235088/everything_you_need_to_know_about_3TB_hard_drives.html


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#6 Platypus

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 06:12 PM

Incidentally for typical workstation use, you'd be unlikely to notice much difference between a 10000 RPM drive and a decent 7200. The main advantages, reduced latency and faster seek time (shorter stroke due to smaller platter diameter), mostly benefit server applications, especially in maximizing the performance of RAID.


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