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My Vidio Card....


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#1 MatreX

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 11:28 AM

Ok i currently have a very sucky intell grasfixs card integrated that intell doesnt even support no more... i was wondering if i could buy a nvidia 6500 and somehow use it even tho this one is integrated??
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#2 legoman786

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 11:30 AM

You can, given that you have the slot for it. Then you have go into your system bios and disable the onboard video.

Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning.
- Rick Cook


#3 MatreX

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 11:32 AM

were would the slot be and what would it look like?
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#4 MatreX

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 11:36 AM

i have 2 slots on the bottom back of my computer, does it slip into one of them?... on the inside
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#5 Herk

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 11:54 AM

Where is your current graphics card? Is it built onto the motherboard? The NVidia you referred to is a PCI Express card - you have to have a PCI Express slot for it. This is not likely to be at the bottom of your motherboard, though anything's possible. Do you know what your motherboard brand and model are? That would help us to figure out what you could use.

#6 Klinkaroo

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 04:34 PM

AGP is another type of graphics card slot it is normally brown... and I was told that PCI-E slots are Green but looking at motherboards I am no lounger sure.

Do you have any other expansion cards installed in your computer and those 2 slots you were talking about are they white. If so these are normally PCI cards (note no -E at the end).

I am pretty sure you can get PCI video cards but they will run slower and are harder to find if you can find any.

BTW If you're computer is Brand Named (Dell, HP, Gateway) what is the model number so that we can look it up.

#7 MatreX

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 05:05 PM

Dell Dimension 2350
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#8 Enthusiast

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 09:32 PM

In addition to having a PCI Express or AGP slot you would have to make sure your power supply was sufficient to handle the power the graphics card would need.

I don't see either in the diagrams for the Dimension 2350 at Dell support.
http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/syst...hov.htm#1101565
Dell usually uses minimally sized power supplies, IE, the Dimension 2350 has only a 200W power supply.

Your next upgrade needs to be to build your own system.

Edited by Enthusiast, 04 April 2006 - 09:34 PM.


#9 legoman786

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 09:44 PM

My Dimension 4550 had only a 250w PSU and I am running a 2.53ghz P4 Northwood (that specific core is known to draw alot of power). I upped it to 550w, now I can play DOOM3 like nothing. Also, I have an AGP slot and upped my card too.

Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning.
- Rick Cook


#10 MatreX

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 03:25 PM

god damnit.... what ever....

is building a computer yourself cheaper then going to a company like alienware and costomizing it?
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#11 Klinkaroo

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 08:07 PM

Yeah alot less expensive... especially alienware they make awsome computers I must say but you have to sheel out the dough for it.

The gaming rig I am building myself next year is about 1800$ with 2 LCD 17 inch monitors.

When you build it yourself you also have the bragging rights that come with it :thumbsup:

#12 megalo

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Posted 11 April 2006 - 02:49 PM

Yeah It is a lot less expensive, but you have to do everything on your own which makes it a big learning experience. I would recommend picking up the PC Modding FOR DUMMIES book. I pretty much used that entire book to build my own pc. But it was made in 2004 and is now relatively outdated and it leaves you to "fill in blanks" in some areas, yet I still recommend it because it still helps you make your own decisions about what type of products you want to buy and informs you on a lot of hardware specific information.

So if you want to try building your own computer, Go for it.
The only person stopping you is yourself, I remember this because I was really nervous when I had 1200 dollars worth of hardware equipment sitting in front of me when I started to build my own computer.
Just take things slow and try to make the most well thought out decisions on the type of hardware you choose.

#13 Rabbuk

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 07:22 PM

i used www.pcmech.com then computer builder guide to build mine. 36 step process. Dont use the parts they suggest they are outdated but other then that its a really easy process to follow.
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[size=7]GO BEARS!

#14 Klinkaroo

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 08:05 PM

I bought the PC Building Bible. It was a special edition magasine published by PC Gamer had a nice 79 step process... all updated parts including SLI, SATA.

It was very informative. In the magasine it also has alot of information on mobos, ram (what to choose), cpus and everything else...

#15 legoman786

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Posted 12 April 2006 - 08:20 PM

Haha you bought the PC BUILDING BIBLE of 2006?? Cost me $10.75 but it was worth it!!

Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning.
- Rick Cook





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