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General PC Knowledge


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#1 panthersfan25

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 02:16 PM

Hello All,

 

 i am fairly new to the world of computing and was wondering exactly what is meant by the % signs in the following description; %system%

 

Why are the % signs used?

 

Also why is the $ sign used in the following manner $C:\

 

I have seen both of these a few times and wondered what they mean.


Thanks!!



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#2 zzz7

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:46 PM

http://www.intrepid.com.au/what-does-systemroot-mean/ here you go. :)

#3 Orange Blossom

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 12:03 AM

That simply answers the question of what "%system%" means, not what the % symbol and $ symbol mean in the situations he/she has given.

 

Orange Blossom :cherry:


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#4 Andrew

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 01:21 PM

Text enclosed within percent signs indicates to Windows that the text corresponds to a system-wide environment variable. A number of variables are defined by default and are mostly used to refer to specific folders without needing to know in advance where the folder is located.

For example, on most Windows systems the main Windows directory is located at C:\Windows, however there's no rule that says it must be at that location or even that it must be named "Windows". By specifying %systemroot% instead of an actual file path, a user/administrator/developer can ask Windows to fill in the actual location of the Windows directory automatically. Other default variables include %userprofile%, %temp%, and %username% which refer to the user's profile directory, the temporary files directory, and the currently logged-on user's name, respectively.

 

I don't know why they chose to use %VARIABLENAME% as the format, but that's what they chose.

 

The dollar sign is a valid file-name character. The only special uses for it involve network shares, specifically hidden/administrative shares.


Edited by Andrew, 12 March 2013 - 01:24 PM.


#5 panthersfan25

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 03:37 PM

Thanks for the info guys that's a big help!!






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