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Computer boots, but no display.


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#1 Ultra-Violet7

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 01:25 PM

Recently, I was encoding in Premiere Pro when I started to hear a high-pitched noise coming from my PC, quiet but still audible; within a few seconds my PC shut off. When I turned it back on, it turned on fine but there was no display on my monitor,  just blank. I checked the VGA Cable, all was fine, I tried taking it out and putting it back in again, still no display. Here's some other things I've tried:

 

- Switching the PCIe slot that my GPU was in.

- Changing GPU. (tried the above with the 5450 at first then the X1600)

- Hooking it up with a different monitor. (a TV)

- Resetting the CMOS.

- Trying HDMI instead of VGA.

- Taking RAM out to listen out for "beeps". (in which I heard none)

 

Still, no display. An interesting thing is when I press the open button on my CD Drive, it opens, and then it closes straight away, automatically. Another interesting thing is that there are no lights on my mouse and keyboard when I turn it on. Usually when I turn my PC on, the red light underneath my mouse and the yellow lights on my keyboard come on to show it is being powered and working.

 

PC Specs (if they may be useful):

 

AMD 8120 CPU (3.1Ghz OC to 4GHz)

Gigabyte GA-DS3-970A Motherboard

AMD Radeon HD 5450 1GB

8GB of DDR3 RAM (GeIL 1333 MHz)

Corsair 650W Power Supply

Seagate Barracuda 360GB HDD

Samsung DVD-RW Drive

Zalman Z9 Midi ATX Case

 

Apart from getting no display and the cd drive acting weird, everything else appears to function fine. The LED lights come on on the fans and RAM (as normal), all the connected fans spin as usual as well as the optional light for my PSU. The LCD temperature display on my case (which connects to pins on the MoBo) works fine as well as the Fan Controller on my case, which is also linked up.

 

Anyway, no idea what's going on here. I'd be more than happy if someone could help me with this. :)



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#2 IAmNotABot

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 04:26 AM

Based on you saying that you have internal lights, but no external ones leads me think either CPU, video card, memory, or PSU.

 

The easiest way to test the memory would be if you have 2x4GB would be to try only one stick at a time.  Even if it works with one, restart the computer and try the other one.  When testing one stick of memory remember to always put it in slot 0.  In the event that you have 1x8GB, getting another stick to eliminate this one would be a good idea.  Worse case, when it is running again, you could start it off with 16GB :)

 

Since you mentioned that you do not have any display with either video card, we need to eliminate this one a little later in the steps.

 

I noticed that your CPU is overclocked.  Do you have a way to see inside your case while it is on?  If so, look directly at the CPU when it comes on.  That fan should stay on all of the time, but I have seen situations that it turns off, even though sensors show otherwise.  In the event that you do not have a fan on top of it, I would consider lowering the overclock, if possible.

 

Unless you know what you are doing, I can not recommend on how to test a PSU other then you would have to google for it. 650w should be plenty for your video card, but difficult to tell how much more you may need if you have exotic cooling inside.  If you have another PSU that you can try, I would go that route.

 

How long have you had this computer and have you added anything recently?



#3 Uncle Rim

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 04:54 AM

If removing the RAM doesn't cause the computer to kick up a fuss, then you have a failure very early in the boot process. This suggests to me that you do not hear the single beep to indicate POST (power on self test) has passed.

 

The high pitched noise you heard was probably a circuit not coping with the load. Most commonly this comes from the power supply, but not always.

 

I personally think that 30+% overclocking is a little aggressive. The first thing you should try is to reset this by removing the CMOS battery with the power cable to the PC disconnected. Leave the battery out for a minute or so before reinstalling it. If you are lucky and have not damaged anything, you will hear two beeps when POST finishes. Then you will have to reset the date and time in BIOS.



#4 Ultra-Violet7

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 02:52 PM

Based on you saying that you have internal lights, but no external ones leads me think either CPU, video card, memory, or PSU.

 

The easiest way to test the memory would be if you have 2x4GB would be to try only one stick at a time.  Even if it works with one, restart the computer and try the other one.  When testing one stick of memory remember to always put it in slot 0.  In the event that you have 1x8GB, getting another stick to eliminate this one would be a good idea.  Worse case, when it is running again, you could start it off with 16GB :)

 

Since you mentioned that you do not have any display with either video card, we need to eliminate this one a little later in the steps.

 

I noticed that your CPU is overclocked.  Do you have a way to see inside your case while it is on?  If so, look directly at the CPU when it comes on.  That fan should stay on all of the time, but I have seen situations that it turns off, even though sensors show otherwise.  In the event that you do not have a fan on top of it, I would consider lowering the overclock, if possible.

 

Unless you know what you are doing, I can not recommend on how to test a PSU other then you would have to google for it. 650w should be plenty for your video card, but difficult to tell how much more you may need if you have exotic cooling inside.  If you have another PSU that you can try, I would go that route.

 

How long have you had this computer and have you added anything recently?

 

Yes, I have 2x 4GB Sticks. Slot 0? My motherboard says DDR3_1, 2, 3 and 4, which one is Slot 0? What should happen if they are indeed working and aren't the problem? :)

 

Yes, I currently have the side of the case off. The fan attached to the heatsink (which is attached to the CPU), turns straight away when I power on. Weirdly enough though, all fans seem to be running at full speed.

 

I have quite a few fans in my system. (1 at the back, 1 on the side, 1 attached to CPU Heatsink, 1 on the top and 1 at the front. All have LEDs)

 

I've had this computer since late December 2012, I built it on Christmas Day and all has been working fine since. :)

 

If removing the RAM doesn't cause the computer to kick up a fuss, then you have a failure very early in the boot process. This suggests to me that you do not hear the single beep to indicate POST (power on self test) has passed.

 

The high pitched noise you heard was probably a circuit not coping with the load. Most commonly this comes from the power supply, but not always.

 

I personally think that 30+% overclocking is a little aggressive. The first thing you should try is to reset this by removing the CMOS battery with the power cable to the PC disconnected. Leave the battery out for a minute or so before reinstalling it. If you are lucky and have not damaged anything, you will hear two beeps when POST finishes. Then you will have to reset the date and time in BIOS.

 

Where should this "beep" be coming from? My actual PC or through my connected headphones/speakers?

 

Oh, that could be a possbility. With all the LED Fans running as well as an overclocked CPU which has a high TDP, I wouldn't be surprised if this is the result.

 

I removed the CMOS battery, waited a minute and reinstalled it, but still no difference and no beeps as far as I know. :(



#5 IAmNotABot

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 08:58 PM

Yes, I have 2x 4GB Sticks. Slot 0? My motherboard says DDR3_1, 2, 3 and
4, which one is Slot 0? What should happen if they are indeed working
and aren't the problem?

 

My mistake on slot 0.  This was an older naming convention.  Currently slot1 would be the first one.  I would like for you to try running the computer with only 1 stick and see if that helps any. 

 

Yes, I currently have the side of the case off. The fan attached to
the heatsink (which is attached to the CPU), turns straight away when I
power on. Weirdly enough though, all fans seem to be running at full
speed.

 

I've had this computer since late December 2012, I built it on Christmas Day and all has been working fine since.

 

This is sounding more and more like a heat issue.  Since the computer is less then 90 days old, there could be things that come up that you did not see before.  Think of it as the "break in" period. 

 

I have quite a few fans in my system. (1 at the back, 1 on the side, 1
attached to CPU Heatsink, 1 on the top and 1 at the front. All have
LEDs)

 

Lets say in worse case that all of the flow directions on the fans are backwards-in this event you would be pulling IN air, not pushing hot air OUT.  The easiest way to test for this would be to use a candle or lighter on the outside and it will be able to show you the flow.  There are many different ways that you could do this, but a typical set up would be side and front fans pull air in and back and top fans blow hot air out.

 

I removed the CMOS battery, waited a minute and reinstalled it, but still no difference and no beeps as far as I know.

 

The single beep that you should be hearing would be withen the first 5-15 seconds after you turn the computer on.  This will be coming from the motherboard and not your speakers.  It is possible with your fans running so high that you might not hear it.  I would turn off all surrounding noises, and if you have to put your ear as close to the case as possible when you turn it back on.

 

If you still do not get any beep, then the next step would be to remove everything from the motherboard, including CPU.  You will want to re-seat everything, including the power cables.  You would not have to remove items that are mounted to the case, such as hard drive, fan, ect., but certainly remove all of the cables on BOTH ends.

 

When you are ready to start back up again, only plug in the CPU fan, back fan, and video card(I would not normally recommend that you start with this, but researched your motherboard and it requires one to start).  Notice that I do not want you to plug in any memory, hard drive(s) or CD/DVD drives.  Plug only the bare necessity in the back-no usb devices or even a keyboard or mouse. Listen very carefully when you start it up for any beeps at all.  In this configuration, you will NOT hear a single beep, but a series of them.   Two different things will happen:

 

You will hear a series beeps-this is what we want.  If you could post what you hear, that would be helpful.  Once you hear it, often times it will repeat to confirm it.  Turn the computer off, wait a few minutes and turn it back on to see if you get the same code.

 

If you do not hear any beeps at all, then I would lean toward the motherboard or CPU.  Most of the time when the PSU goes out, it would not boot up in this basic configuration.

 

Any further troubleshooting would involve removing the motherboard from the case to verify the standoffs are in the correct position and would also give you the chance to see if there are any burn marks on the underside of it.

 

Out of curiousity, did someone else set up your overclock? 

 






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