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Unmountable Boot Volume - Now "No Partition Table" Error


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#1 afili8ter

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 12:23 AM

Hello,

 

OS: Windows XP Pro (Version 2002) (Service Pack 3)

Hard Drive: Seagate Barracuda 7200.0 (160 Gbytes)

 

 

A few days ago, my computer suddenly froze up on me. When I went to reboot it, I got the Blue Screen of Death with the error:

 

UNMOUNTABLE_BOOT_VOLUME

0X000000ED (0x8ADADE30, 0xC000007F, 0x00000000, 0x00000000)

 

After reding the steps to recover from Microsoft's websites and trying the CHKDSK /R command AND THE FIXBOOT command, the os will not load.

 

To make matters worse, now when I turn on the computer, the hard drive isn't listed any more and then I get an error that I have No Partition Table during the bootup process.

 

At this point, I'm not sure if the hard drive will ever load back up. I usually back up my data, but I've lacked on that for a few months now and I have too much data on it to just let it go and trash the hard drive.

 

Question: Is it possible for me to buy the same exact hard drive, then take the platter out of my old hard drive and put it in the new hard drive casing to be able to retrieve my data?

 

Any help appreciated.

 

afili8ter

 

 

 



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#2 James Litten

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 12:47 AM

Hi

 

That kind of repair needs to be done in a clean room with specialized precision tools. If the data is very important, you can send it to a professional data recovery service but it can be expensive. Seagate offers that service as well as many other reputable companies.

 

Do you still see the drive listed in the BIOS?

 

James



#3 afili8ter

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 01:14 AM

Hi

 

That kind of repair needs to be done in a clean room with specialized precision tools. If the data is very important, you can send it to a professional data recovery service but it can be expensive. Seagate offers that service as well as many other reputable companies.

 

Do you still see the drive listed in the BIOS?

 

James

It's not showing in the BIOS any more. It did before I started using the CHKDSK /R command and the FIXBOOT command. Even when it did show before, I used it as a slave on the same computer, being as though I had a backup os, it still didn't show any hard drive space or capacity once I was logged into Windows.

 

Besides sending it to anyone to fix, can it be done by a home computer tech?



#4 James Litten

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 11:48 AM

Unfortunately, if you can't see it with the BIOS then you need to send it to a professional data recovery service.

 

Wish I had better news.

James



#5 afili8ter

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 01:25 PM

Unfortunately, if you can't see it with the BIOS then you need to send it to a professional data recovery service.

 

Wish I had better news.

James

Are you sayingthat even if I bought the same exact hard drive, I couldn't swap out the platter, put it in the new hard drive and recover my data?



#6 James Litten

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 03:46 PM

Hi

 

You can only do that if you have a 'clean room' and the proper tools for removing the platters. Then you would need the software required to properly calibrate the drive since all platters are slightly different in shape (tracks are not actually perfect circles) and the way data is arranged on the platters is often slightly different from drive to drive (even the same model/lot). That's just the tip of the iceberg smile.png

 

You can't really buy "the same exact hard drive" since the scale of the data on them is so small each drive is individually calibrated so no two are exactly alike.

 

In most cases other things would be repaired or replaced before removing the platters. Like the heads or in your case they would probably start with electrical and firmware testing and replace or repair those if problems were found there. It used to be that you could replace the PCboard on drives with one from the same model but even that stopped working after drives got over oh, about 40GB since they are calibrated at the manufacturer and each drive is slightly different.

 

If you open the hard drive's case in a normal environment, it will likely be destroyed within minutes of putting it back together and powering it on. Even if you did nothing but look at it.

 

James






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