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Test Bench


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#1 Darc56

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 06:59 AM

Hi all.

I've been looking for a test bench for our lab, but have been unable to find anything usefull. From all the ones I have been able to find none have a working default setup so you can test all parts.

If that made no sense this is pretty much what I would find ideal.

 

2 mounting points for MOB's, PSU, DVD and HDD. So you can have a default working setup consisting of PSU, MOB/cpu, DVD and HDD that all run, in this set up you could test things such as memory PCI'e slots, moniotors, USB ports, etc.

 

Alternativly you could have a second slot for MOB, PSU, DVD and HDD.

 

Hopefuly that makes sense

cheers Graeme



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#2 dpunisher

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 09:20 AM

Good luck on that.

 

I have been doing this for close to 20 years now and i have not had or seen any test bench enclosure like you mention.  Some have tried, but it essentialy takes too long to throw components/swap components in any type of test enclosure.  I had a test enclosure setup ~2000, and the motherboard just layed on standoffs with studs to keep the mobo in place.  Still, back then you had soooo many different motherboards.  AMD, INTEL slots and sockets, socket 7, P4, P3, etc.  It just became a hassle dealing with any type of enclosure at all. 

 

I resorted to (and it has been the best solution so far) an ATX sized piece of plywood 5/8" thick, PSUs, assorted PATA/SATA HD and optical drives, cables, and a monitor, all laid out on a section of my bench.  I have motherboards from many vintages going back to '94, Intel and AMD sockets (slots) galore.  If I need to test something, it takes literally a couple minutes (or less) to throw something together to test whatever components need to be tested.  I was an old school auto tech, and time is money, and I hate to waste either.


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#3 rotor123

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 12:35 PM

I totally Agree with dpunisher

 

Where I worked for 16 + Years we had custom built test benches. They had a drawer on the right hand side to hold things. A Thick Plywood top 4 foot wide by 4 foot deep. Then there was the top shelf that was 1 foot above the top of the bench to hold the 19" monitor and four port KVM that also switched speakers. Stereo Speakers hooked up to the KVM. 16 AC power outlets mounted at the back of the bench. That bench could handle up to 4 desktop/ laptop computers at one time. Also 4 Ethernet cables connected to a Gigabit router for internet and a file server access. Pull Out keyboard with a Mouse pad attached to it.

 

Then behind it shelves holding Assorted Power supplies for testing purposes. and assorted Motherboards for Intel and AMD CPUs. Desktop and Laptop Memory for testing. Spare PCI, PCI Express and VGA video cards, Regular and low profile. Floppy, IDE,  SCSI and SATA hard dries and Optical drives for testing.

 

I kept one P4 computer with 2Gig memory that had free SATA and IDE ports for data recovery and transfers on one bench. I Kept a IBM IntelliStation running XP off of SCSI 10K drives with a DVD burner for downloading drivers, Etc. Under one bench

 

Two more benches in the back room for replacing Bad capacitors and Laptop DC-In Jacks and the occasional USB Port.

 

Those benches were what the chain I worked for provided to all their Locations.

 

Good Luck

Roger


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