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win 7 startup repair loop


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#1 petebskee

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 08:33 PM

Hey looking for some help and think this could be the right section. I am running windows 7 on a Asus k50in laptop but on going to start it up today windows would not load up, I had to force a restart at which point it ran a system scan and rebooted at which point I ran a system repair which advised it had completed a repair but restarted and kicked in again, it again tried a repair then restarted. At this point it advised it could not repair automatically, and on each restart I do it just kicks straight in to system repair. The details it gives for the problem even are as follows: event name -startuprepairoffline, signature 01 -6.1.7600.16385, signature 02 - 6.1.7600.16385, signature 03 - unknown, signature 04 -21200980, signature 05 - autofailover, signature 06 - 10, signature 07 -corruptregistry, os version 6.1.7600.2.0.0.256.1, locale is - 1033. Any instructions greatly appreciated. Thank you!

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 09:39 AM

Worth reading, IMO:  http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-system/corrupt-registry-root-cause-in-startup-repair/f77d5355-b8be-41d6-af24-cae994e1768f .

 

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#3 9696andrew

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:34 PM

Hey looking for some help and think this could be the right section. I am running windows 7 on a Asus k50in laptop but on going to start it up today windows would not load up, I had to force a restart at which point it ran a system scan and rebooted at which point I ran a system repair which advised it had completed a repair but restarted and kicked in again, it again tried a repair then restarted. At this point it advised it could not repair automatically, and on each restart I do it just kicks straight in to system repair. The details it gives for the problem even are as follows: event name -startuprepairoffline, signature 01 -6.1.7600.16385, signature 02 - 6.1.7600.16385, signature 03 - unknown, signature 04 -21200980, signature 05 - autofailover, signature 06 - 10, signature 07 -corruptregistry, os version 6.1.7600.2.0.0.256.1, locale is - 1033. Any instructions greatly appreciated. Thank you!

use your startup repair disks (that you created when you first got your laptop) or do a full system restore by booting to the recovery partition.  googling your specific make/model and geting the manual should provide you with full directions on how do to this. 

 

if you need to backup files first, download the manual, remove the hard drive, and connect it to another working machine with an external hard drive connection kit.



#4 petebskee

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:53 PM

Can't seem to find much online in regards to manuals, the one I could view made no reference to booting to recovery partition, altho only being able to search on my mobile is making things a lot more difficult. Any suggestions on where to start in doing that? I would search out the back up discs but I know they are miles away. Thanks again

#5 petebskee

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 04:44 PM

I have found an option via f9 at startup, windows setup ems enabled, which then takes me thrioigh to Asus preload wizard, before I run this I wanted to check whether doing so will clear the data from my d drive or just c drive, if so how would i back up both drives? Or can i only do so manually. Thanks again

#6 Noviciate

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 05:55 PM

Good evening. smile.png

If you have access to another computer you can create a Linux boot disk and recover files via a flashdrive:

Step 1 - creating a boot disk with an alternative operating system on it.

Download lupu-525.iso from here and save it to your Desktop. It's a 128 Mb file, so it will take some minutes to download.

You then need to burn the .iso file to disk. My personal choice is InfraRecorder, available here, which is a free, GPL version 3, solution.
 

  • Run the program and select the Write Image option in the main window.
  • Navigate to the .iso file that you downloaded and double click it.
  • Insert a blank disc into the correct CD drive.
  • Click OK and sit back and relax.
  • The disc will be ejected when the task is complete so, unless you uncheck this option, mind the drawer!

Step 2 - change the boot order, if you need to, so that the PC boots from the new OS rather than Windows.
 

  • There's a handy pictorial guide here.
  • If you have any questions about this step, ask before you proceed. If you enter the BIOS and are unsure if you have carried out the step correctly, there should be an option to exit without keeping changes, so you won't do any harm.

When you boot the PC, the boot order is the order in which the various possibilities of finding an operating system are checked by your system. Normally the hard drive is first in line as it is usually where the OS resides. By checking this one first the PC will boot in the quickest time possible.
By changing the order the PC will check the CD drive first, and if it finds a disk with an OS on, it will boot from it. If it doesn't find one, it then looks at the second device on the list, which should be the hard drive and it will boot from that.

I change the boot order on all my machines so that if ever I need to boot from a disk I can do so without needing to access the BIOS then and there - there's usually a problem that i'm trying to deal with and adding a second or two to the normal boot time is a price worth paying to be able to instantly boot from a disk rather than have to get into the BIOS when i'm already stressed by a sick PC.

Step 3 - boot from disk and recover files.
 

  • Insert the newly burned disk and reboot the machine.
  • Wait for Puppy to get it's little tail wagging and the Desktop to appear.
  • Once it's up and running, you'll have the opportunity to customise the keyboad and language settings, which is never a bad idea.
  • Allow the restart of the Desktop to finalise any changes, if you've made any, and that part is done.
  • In the bottom left hand hand corner you should see all the partitions that Puppy has found on your hard drive, which on my system are labelled sda1, sda2, etc..., and sr0 which is the disk that you booted from.
  • Left click each of the sda icons and you should see a window open and a green disk appear over the icon to indicate that it is now accessible.
  • This is the equivalent of Windows Explorer or My Computer depending on how you navigate your PC's file system.
  • Insert your flashdrive and it should autodetect and you'll see an icon appear with the others  in the bottom left, mine's called sdb1.
  • Left click it, as with the other icons.
  • Now all you need to do is to find the files that you want to rescue and Copy and Paste them to your flashdrive just as you do within Windows.
  • Once done, click the "Puppy" icon in the bottom left hand corner of the Desktop and select Shutdown > Power-off Computer
  • When prompted to save the session, select <DO NOT SAVE> and the PC should shutdown.

 


So long, and thanks for all the fish.

 

 





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