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After failed graphics card and replacement, Windows 7 Pro 64bit seems trashed.


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#1 painterh52

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:32 PM

Hi all;

I have a 7 year old home built system with the following specs: Dual-boot w/Windows 7 Pro 64 bit and Ubuntu 12.04 64bit

     Case- CoolerMaster Centurian 5 mid tower

     MB-    Asus A8N-SLI Deluxe ( AMD 939 platform)

     Memory- 3 Gigabytes Corsair XMS EXtreme DDr (2 @ 1 GB, 2@ 512 MB)

     Current Graphics Card- PCI Express 2.0 PNY Geforce GT 620 (1024MB DDR3)

     Previous (failed graphics card)  PCI Express 2.0 Asus Geforce 7600GS silent w/256MB DDR

     CPU- AMD dual core Opteron 170 w/Thermaltake "Big Typhoon" cooler.

     2 Hard drives- both 7200 rpm SATA Seagate Barricudas @ 160GB

     Combination multi card reader/floppy drive (yes I said floppy drive).

     Have run this system overclocked from 2.0Gigahertz to 2.6 Gigahertz for over 5 years at stock voltage.

Here is my dilema:

     Just prior to previous graphics card failure, I started battling random blue screens, crashes, and errors.  Finally, the system would not boot into Windows or Ubuntu.  I gradually narrowed it down to the graphics card.  I bought and installed the new card and it boots up Ubuntu boots quickly and runs very well, however, Windows 7 does not boot.  I suspect some kind of driver corruption or the like.  Windows hangs while displaying the animated logo.  I have tried booting into safe mode (which it will do), but windows runs so slowly it is unusable.  It literally takes about 10 minutes to get completely booted into safe mode, then it is so slow I can't do anything.  I have tried the "repair my computer: option but I always reports that it could not be repaired.  The problem signature always contains the message "Bad Driver".  I have tried the repair from within Windows and from my repair disk, always with the same result.  I even tried running System File Checker and CHKDSK with no success.  System File Checker hangs during the verification stage at 7%.  I let it run for over 4 hours at 7% with no success.  I have also run Memtest overnight without errors. 

     Is there any way to do a repair install from my install disk without losing my data?  Obviously,I am unable to do a repair install from within windows.  I have also tried running the hardware using bios defaults with no difference.  Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.  I am posting this from within Ubuntu on said machine.

    If this the wrong forum for this, it could be moved to the Hardware section.


Edited by painterh52, 15 February 2013 - 12:35 PM.


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#2 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 06:14 PM

Yes.

Power up your computer, it doesn't need to boot to anything  all you want to do is get power on your optical drive so you can get the Windows install disc in. Then shut it down and re-boot it. Since you have a dual boot system you should either come to a screen which asks boot from Ubuntu or Cd, or you will be told 'Press any key to boot from Cd'. Press any key and let it boot. You will come to a screen which asks you to pick a default language, and having picked one, the next screen asks 'Install Windows' or 'Repair Windows'. Choose 'Repair' and let it run. This will do a repair install which will not overwrite your data.

 

It is possible that your Windows system has become too badly corrupted for this to work, in which case you will have to do a complete re-install, which will wipe out your data. A way to get round this problem is to take out the HDD that you Windows is on, plug it into someone else's computer as a second drive, and you should be able to copy the data off it either to the original hard drive in that computer or to an external hard drive. Then return your hard drive to your computer and carry out a complete re-install of Windows. This is a complete pain in the rear because you will then have to re-install everything that was on that partition.

 

Good luck,

 

Chris Cosgrove



#3 painterh52

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 11:27 AM

Yes.

Power up your computer, it doesn't need to boot to anything  all you want to do is get power on your optical drive so you can get the Windows install disc in. Then shut it down and re-boot it. Since you have a dual boot system you should either come to a screen which asks boot from Ubuntu or Cd, or you will be told 'Press any key to boot from Cd'. Press any key and let it boot. You will come to a screen which asks you to pick a default language, and having picked one, the next screen asks 'Install Windows' or 'Repair Windows'. Choose 'Repair' and let it run. This will do a repair install which will not overwrite your data.

 

It is possible that your Windows system has become too badly corrupted for this to work, in which case you will have to do a complete re-install, which will wipe out your data. A way to get round this problem is to take out the HDD that you Windows is on, plug it into someone else's computer as a second drive, and you should be able to copy the data off it either to the original hard drive in that computer or to an external hard drive. Then return your hard drive to your computer and carry out a complete re-install of Windows. This is a complete pain in the rear because you will then have to re-install everything that was on that partition.

 

Good luck,

 

Chris Cosgrove

Thanks for the response Chris.  I did try what you suggested with no joy.  All I get is "Windows was unable to repair this computer", so I have decided that (like you also mentioned), is to do a wipe and clean install.  I have begun the chore of locating all of my data and copying to a separate partition.  I know from much experience that it will run much better with a fresh install.  It is a still a major pain, though.

Thanx

Painterh52






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