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Windows 8 installation hesitation


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#1 mrsbeautiful05

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:07 PM

I've been preparing my computer for an upgrade to 8, but i'm hesitant now seeing the posts about infected computers. I'm just on the other side of an infected PC. So i'm nervous about installing. Any advice? I have purchased the license, and can download it from the net, or wait for my CD to arrive. Is there a 'best' way to do it?


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#2 charlesDean

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:44 AM

Hi Friend,

 

You don't need to hesitant or become nervous about installing Windows 8.You can get free license for 3 months. It gives an amazing user interface to user you can enjoy with this metro style user interface.Also performance it excellent.So use it frankly.smile.png



#3 James Litten

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 09:12 PM

What happens after the 3 months if you don't like it? LOL!

 

Anyway, Windows 8 is just as safe as Windows 7 (even safer if using secure boot) when it comes to viruses. So if that is your only concern then it shouldn't be a problem.

 

Either install technique is fine. Be sure and make a good backup of your important data first.

 

James



#4 mrsbeautiful05

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 02:03 PM

Hello to those who replied:

 

I still haven't installed it yet, but I'm ready to now. I have Win7 Home Ed, right now, and I'm going to upgrade. I installed Win7, and had several probs with it, so i'm nervous about doing this one. When I ran the Win8 Compatibility report, it told me that Secure Boot isn't compatible with my PC. I think it is with Win7 on my PC now... not sure. But that makes me nervous. Also, there are a few components that require updates. Would I need to update them before i install or after? They are mostly from my HP printer all in one software. iTunes, Skype, and Microsoft Web Platform installer needs updating.

 

Can anyone help with this? Also, my laptop is non-touch, so I hope the 'classic shell' works on my PC.


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#5 mrsbeautiful05

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 02:43 PM

Not really sure why no one replied to my topic above... but i'm still at the same point. I haven't yet installed 8. I need to do a recent backup of data, and then begin the process. Only i have no experience with 'dumping' an OS. I'd like to do a clean install, as to have no problems, but I know that i can upgrade as well. So just not sure how to go about this. Any more suggestions out there? I'd need someone who will 'talk' to me on my tech level. I'm not a beginner, per se, but i'm not a novice either.


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#6 Kikero

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 12:05 AM

Hi, Windows 8's secure boot feature doesn't work on a lot of older hardware. It depends on UEFI, and not all motherboards come standard with that. Other than that Windows 8 has several other security improvements which work to help prevent malware. Just for the upgrade, as then Windows will back up all your content for you in a folder named Windows.old in the root of your main drive. Also, don't worry about when you upgrade if Windows 8 notified you of software incompatibility, as the wording is very misleading; most software works on Windows 8 if it works on Windows 7. I advise you to proceed with the update, as I am sure you will enjoy Windows 8, even without the touch screen abilities. 



#7 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 02:25 AM

Hi

 

Instead of upgrading the installed Win 7 to 8, i recommend doing a clean install. You can backup all the data from C to another partition. After install finishes, you can download and install the latest versions of the softwraes you are using.



#8 Kikero

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 03:20 AM

Hi

 

Instead of upgrading the installed Win 7 to 8, i recommend doing a clean install. You can backup all the data from C to another partition. After install finishes, you can download and install the latest versions of the softwraes you are using.

 

 

With due respect I would disagree with the choice to do a clean install. It isn't needed, and even if he backs up his data to another drive it becomes a hassle to restore data, as compared the Windows.old folder where there are tools to restore the data. Specifically this: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-ZA/windows-8/restore-files-upgrade-windows-old

 

 

As compared to having it in another partition where the data may be harder to access, and also easier to misinterpret at a later time. Plus, if you decide to clear the old data, clearing the Windows.old folder is much easier for a user. 



#9 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:23 AM

Hi

 

I always prefer to keep data in separate partition. A single partition with all data and OS is a bad idea. I will describe the benefits of multiple partitions in short words.

 

1 ) Protection from file system corruption.

 

File system corruption can be happen due to either sudden power failure or an improper shutdown. In most case it is the C drive which gets corrupted. If you keep the data in D drive , you have a better chance of survival from an unexpected shutdown.

 

2 ) Protection from OS corruption. 

 

Virus attack can be happen to any Windows PC at any time. Due to the increasing number of zero day vulnerabilities, using a top rated AV can't guarantee you absolute safety. If your Windows become unbootable due to malware attack, you can easily reformat the OS without worrying about losing data. On the other hand if you prefer to keep all the data on C drive, you need to use a live CD and copy all the data to an external medium before re-installing the OS.

 

Just visit the Malware logs section to understand the seriousness of this.

 

3 ) Protection from bad sectors.

 

Other than malware, the second reason for Windows corruption and NTFS corruption is bad sectors in the HDD surface. About 80 % of HDD develops bad sectors in the first portion which includes the C. As you know OS registry and page files are resides in the C drive. Windows need to read and write to the page file frequently during the system up time. This high read \write activity makes C drive portion more prone to bad sectors than any other volume. In my line of work, i rarely saw bad sectors in the middle or last portions. 

 

 All the above opinions are from my practical experience in the IT support field. Whether partition or not is up to you but i strongly recommend creating at least 2 volumes. A 50 GB C drive and the rest to a D drive for data. 


Edited by Anshad Edavana, 31 May 2013 - 08:59 AM.


#10 Winterland

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 08:58 AM

Good morning mrsbeautiful05. I'd like to +1 Anshad Edavana's suggestion to do a clean install, esp. in light of your recent infection.

 

Upgrading can lead to a number of issues where as a clean install is just that - clean. You won't have to worry about any registry issues and/or any traces of your recent infection.

 

Back up all the important data / files you need somewhere else and then drop that CD/DVD in and let her run.

 

I believe one of the first windows (no pun intended :lol: ) that you will see will be the option to Upgrade or Install (it might say Custom Install) and then from there it's all pretty straight forward, enter Activation Key, agree to the EULA, etc.

 

As for the couple of other issues that no one seems to have addressed: the classic shell - shouldn't be an issue. Personally, I'm holding onto Win7 as long as I can but if you find the layout in Win 8 confusing / awkward, rest assured you won't be alone and it is being addressed, as per this post here by Budapest.

 

And if you find you'd like the Start Menu, ReviverSoft made this post, which seems like a good idea.

 

As for updating any and all apps, I would strongly suggest that you do all of that after you perform the clean install.

 

Not sure if you're using it or not but Secunia 2.0 (not 3.0) is very helpful and a great app when making sure your machine is patched and up-to-date. If you need a link to find it, please let me know.

 

Hope that's enough information for you and if you need anything else that I can help you with please let me know.

 

onward,

 

Winterland

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#11 Winterland

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 09:10 AM

Oh, and in my quest to restate the obvious - and please note I am not talking down to you - just want to make sure that you know, or remember, that once the clean install in performed, any apps that you had previously installed (that did not come with Win7) will have to be reinstalled as will any apps (anti-virus, anti-malware, anti-spyware, anti-decaf coffee :lol: ) that you downloaded.

 

I suspect that you might have known this, but wanted to remind you.

 

Now would be a good time to check to see if those install disks for those apps are still around.

 

Winterland


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#12 Bezukhov

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 11:01 AM

Allow me to throw another questuion out there.

 

I ran the Upgrade Assistant and this message caught my attention:

 

Secure Boot isn't compatible with your PC
      Your PC's firmware doesn't support Secure Boot so you won't be able to use
      it in Windows 8.

 

 

Do you really need the Secure Boot to run Win 8? Would there be any issues if I installed it anyways?


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#13 Kikero

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Posted 31 May 2013 - 04:21 PM

1 ) Protection from file system corruption.
 
This is just as likely as having partitions corrupted. Therefor the point is really moot. 
 
2 ) Protection from OS corruption. 
 
In the modern era malware seems to be more focused on theft and monetary gain rather than the destruction of data. Also, if it is something very serious, such as a PFI, then it doesn't always matter where the data is stored. Also, recommending a re-install isn't something that should be done if it is not needed. With today's tools an unbootable machine is still fixable. Rather than lose data from the second installation, and go back to step 1. 
 
 
3 ) Protection from bad sectors.
 
People should have a regular upkeep with their computers, which can take care of things like this. Using people's incapability and bad thought process as governing logic isn't the best idea imho. 
 
 
 
Realistically, it doesn't matter which way the user goes. These are all hypothetical. Also, Winderland, when you upgrade none of the registry is kept from the previous installation. 
 
 
 
 

Allow me to throw another questuion out there.
 
I ran the Upgrade Assistant and this message caught my attention:
 

Secure Boot isn't compatible with your PC
      Your PC's firmware doesn't support Secure Boot so you won't be able to use
      it in Windows 8.


No, it is fine. You do not need this for Windows 8 to work properly. It is just an additional security feature. Good luck with installation!

#14 Anshad Edavana

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 12:56 AM

Hi Kikero

 

With all respect, i humbly disagree to you.

 

Do you know that today's malwares are packed with rootkit technology ?. When a malware removal helper founds a rootkit or backdoor infection, first advice they give to the user is to consider formatting the OS.  The reason behind this is, Rootkits are hard to detect and none of the today's AV programs are not able to detect even the known rootkits out there. BC malware helpers are really good and had a good success rate in removing rootkits like zero access .Today's malware including the ransomewares  are known to use Rootkits to hide their presence from AV programs.   If you can spend a little time to read the malware removal log section in this forum, you will see the increasing number of backdoor type infections. I am not saying to immediately re-install the OS in case of a malware attack but it is the only known way to make sure the remnants of the infection is clean.

 

 http://www.raymond.cc/blog/10-antirootkits-tested-to-detect-and-remove-a-hidden-rootkit/

 

To understand the benefits of separating OS and Data, you should be either a PC tech who repair hundreds of systems or a system administrator in a large company. I have seen hundreds of hard drives with corrupted file system in C Drive due to either bad sector or sudden power failure. Since we generally keep OS and data in separate partitions, most of the time we are able to rescue the data.

 

 Yes, in case of a catastrophic HDD failure , it doesn't matter whether there are multiple partition or not. But using multiple partitions will increase the chances of your survival.

Take your time to read the posts in XP, VISTA,7 and 8 sections. You can see several examples with users are struggling to copy their data to an external medium before re-installing Windows (when repair attempts failed ).

 

http://partition.radified.com/partitioning_2.htm


Edited by Anshad Edavana, 01 June 2013 - 03:41 AM.


#15 mrsbeautiful05

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:23 PM

Wow, all this is pretty confusing to me. To this date, i still haven't installed 8. I would like to in the future. Right now, I don't have any corruptions. I have no clue how to partition a drive, nor how to dump the old one for a clean install. I'd have to have someone do it for me. So i'm not really sure what to make of everyone's suggestions at this point.


Namaste!

Love & Light

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